'between the branches m.fauvet-TLC 11-2-16

Fly Casting- the Vertical Hoop drill

a lot of fly casting practise involves using rings, a hoop or any other object placed on the ground. this teaches us target distance acquisition and of course, accuracy.
the next step up from there is placing that hoop or something similar vertically and casting through it. (in her fantastic book Fly Casting Techniques, Joan Wulff offered the idea of casting through a car window and later varying the opening of that window by making it go up or down) this vertically-oriented target, or rather ‘loop passage space’ adds loop size to the previous learned skills.

what’s the point ? apart from variety, fun and a nice game to play with other casting nerds, learning to control loop size is really important when casting into the wind because a small loop takes up a lot less physical space and is less influenced by wind. casting into the wind needs a higher line speed as well and we can just add the extra line speed drill to the ‘through the hoop’ exercise.

the other very obvious reason is when having to cast with obstacles either in front of us or behind. those obstacles will vary greatly but maybe the most common are trees and their branches as in the pic below.'between the branches m.fauvet-TLC 11-2-16
this was a while back in deepest-darkest Sweden and if memory’s correct, the only available back casting space i had was a little tunnel about 1 metre and a half wide. i put this pic here as a reminder of how important it is to do the hoop drill on the back cast as well as in front. it goes without saying that turning around and aiming for the empty space is the only way this is going to happen with success.

 

this great little clip from Chris Morris shows the hoop drill in both real and slomo. variances of the drill could be varying the casting distances, how much line is shot through the hoop, side casting with loops at various angles and when you get good at this, casting at an angle instead of straight on. (the hoop’s height remains the same but its width ‘ovals’, for lack of a better physics term) that one’s tricky !

practise never really makes perfect but it always makes gooder so here’s hoping this will inspire a few. enjoy !

codsalmon

Salmon ears, Sound and vibration in water, Fish Communication and Noisy noises

and a whole bunch of other really cool/interesting/thought-provoking/andjustplaingoodreading fishy-science facts from MCX Fisher via buddy Pete Tyjas’ always great Eat Sleep Fish ezine.

even if the only image in the article appears to be a cod,

codsalmon
based on Atlantic salmon research, MCX goes a stretch further on explaining and going into great detail (and be sure to follow the adjoing links !*) on, eh, there’s no way i can add any more info on this subject so here’s a few excerpts:
“The underwater sound environment is entirely different to that in which we live in air. Accordingly, when thinking about the underwater world we have to dump our experience and preconceptions. Simply, salmon don’t ‘hear’ like us, because they don’t have ears”

“The key features of sound in water are that it:
– Is about 800 times more intense than in air, because the water is incompressible and therefore a much more efficient transmitter. In addition the surface layer reflects sound back into the water.
-Travels far further than in air: relatively minor events are detectable at ranges measured in kilometres, but the level of background noise is relatively very high because it is drawn from a much wider area.
-Goes about 4.4 times faster.
-Is influenced by the composition of the water.”

So much, so interesting, but what is its relevance to the angler?
If certain frequencies can stimulate a salmon to attack oceanic prey, can we exploit this in fresh water? In thinking about this it helps to grasp what 300 Hz sounds like in air : for comparison Middle C is 261 Hz. It is certainly much higher than the dull thrum of commonplace line vibration in fast water, which is in the range 10-30 Hz.”

and lastly,
“The moment you step into a pool the salmon’s formidable sensors will detect your activity, even if you have felt soles and a light step. However, they don’t know it’s you or what you’re doing, because in evolutionary terms humans haven’t been angling long enough to achieve any genetic impact on salmon. Unlike the calls of whales, seals and other fish, salmon anglers’ noises aren’t in the salmon signal library. Certainly they wouldn’t be able to connect the crunch of your studs on the gravel and the clink of your wading staff on the rocks with the drama of being caught, except perhaps if they’d been caught shortly before by another heavy-footed fisherman.”

but there’s a gazillion more fascinating things to read on this noisy subject and to do so simply click the cod ! enjoy !


* and one of those happens to be a really geeky but eversocool Beeps, Chirps and Noise channel on youtube where i found this little brown noise treat ! (yeah, that’s sounds a little idon’tknowwhat but don’t be afraid, you won’t have to go clean up after listening to it… )

“Brown noise is noise with a power spectral density inversely proportional to the frequency squared. It decreases in power by 6 dB per octave or 20 dB per decade. The sound of brown noise mimics a waterfall or heavy rainfall.”

Garonne lecanoscopy:ftlow m.fauvet-TLC 8-2-16

so far yet so close

one of the most fascinating aspects i’ve discovered since starting the Lecanoscopy/For the Love of Water photo series is how virtually impossible it is to discern how far away the image was taken from the water’s surface.
some macro images appear to be aerial shots one might do from a helicopter and inversely, some far-away shots seem to be taken up close. yet another example of how this oh-so familiar element still has it’s own little secrets.

the image below is of the Garonne river taken from a bridge 25 or so metres above in Toulouse, France.
see what i mean ?

Garonne lecanoscopy:ftlow m.fauvet-TLC 8-2-16

How to Fish Emergers for Trout

the title says it all. filled with very excellent tips, this great fishing technique tutorial by Peter Charles warants no more additional comments on my part apart from the suggestion that this is an absolutely fantastic and very fun manner to fish traditional North Country Wets or Spiders or their contemprary counterparts and variants. continuing that thought, the very same fishing techniques will be just as effective with the use of other types of wet flies, unweighted nymphs or in a pinch if you don’t have any just-subsurface flies in your box that day, a ‘drowned’ dry. (just soak it by pinching it underwater till it doesn’t float anymore)

enjoy !

Cartoon fish

two short informative animated films for both young and older kids i hope you’ll enjoy and share with those around you.
first up, a concise description of the life cycle of Atlantic salmon. this one’s specifically about Scottish salmon but the principle is the same for any of our sea-going migratory fish around the world.

and secondly, a little reminder of just how precious a comidity water is. its not something we should take for granted and this, for kids of all ages.

previously posted articles on Conservation/Environment and Fish/Ichtyology

wet dreams m.fauvet-TLC 4-2-16

“Surrealism in painting amounted to little more than

the contents of a meagrely stocked dream world: a few witty fantasies, mostly wet dreams and agoraphobic nightmares.” ~Susan Sontag

maybe she meant something like this ? i have no idea as something within just tells me to pull out the camera and use it. after that the image is out of the hands that never really held it.
when it comes to artsy stuff, and i know very well we all have the knee-jerk reaction of trying to associate whatever artsy stuff we’re experiencing to something within us, our experiences, emotions, whatnots and what we’ve learned from others through time but that tends to lead to the stereotypical visions Susan describes in her quote.
a more challenging yet much more interesting and enriching approach is to try to wipe the mind’s eye slate clean before any artsy encounter and maybe stab it with a spoon if it won’t listen.
if we can manage to do this, we may still like or dislike or feel ambivalent about whatever it is but at least that opinion will be as close to our own as can be. anyhow, this empty lake made me think of a witty wet dream…

wet dreams m.fauvet-TLC 4-2-16

greenwave m.fauvet-TLC 3-2-16_edit_edit_edit_edit

Mystery Casting Pond X

this little farm pond has had many names in the past. it started as Mystery Pond X but that’s so common it was regularly confused with all the other Mystery Pond Xs around the globe so i had to get a little creative.
it used to have stocked rainbow trout in it so Lake Trouto seemed to make sense, at least in a non-confusing yet highly mindless and tacky way. the owner, a very kind, gentle and very old man whose nose is the same colour and size as a basketball stopped stocking trout a while back and the ones that where left-over eventually turned into food for furred, winged and slimy two-legged creatures but there had always been grass and common carp in there so Trouto turned into Carpo.

Lake Carpo sounds cool but after ten or so, yes, ten or so years… i’ve yet been able to properly hook one of these scaled giants. i did foul hook a grass carp whilst targeting trout years ago but it broke off the tippet in about as much time as it takes to say Lake Carpo three times really quickly. the carpers out there will scoff at my lack of success but that’s something i can live with. i’ve caught plenty of carp but just never in this little ghost carp pond-hell and that’s ok too because maybe that’s what will make Carpo so memorable.

next up was the small yet always fun and forever beautiful perch that seemed to thrive in there. i’d had several 50+ perch landing days with a personal best of 76 but they seem to have teleported themselves wherever it is that perch teleport themselves. i almost forgot, at that stage the pond of course took on the Lake Percho nomenclature. normal.

i’m probably wrong but for the moment i consider this pond to now be fishless to the point where i still go regularly to practice my casting but don’t even bring any flies to not be distracted if some fish happened to magically appear.
you got it, things go full circle so in a fit of total lack of renaming creativity, this little cutie has a new name:
Casting Pond X.

greenwave m.fauvet-TLC 3-2-16_edit_edit_edit_edit
this is the back view at CPX. funny, i’d never noticed how beautiful it could be…