Cartoon fish

two short informative animated films for both young and older kids i hope you’ll enjoy and share with those around you.
first up, a concise description of the life cycle of Atlantic salmon. this one’s specifically about Scottish salmon but the principle is the same for any of our sea-going migratory fish around the world.

and secondly, a little reminder of just how precious a comidity water is. its not something we should take for granted and this, for kids of all ages.

previously posted articles on Conservation/Environment and Fish/Ichtyology

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“Surrealism in painting amounted to little more than

the contents of a meagrely stocked dream world: a few witty fantasies, mostly wet dreams and agoraphobic nightmares.” ~Susan Sontag

maybe she meant something like this ? i have no idea as something within just tells me to pull out the camera and use it. after that the image is out of the hands that never really held it.
when it comes to artsy stuff, and i know very well we all have the knee-jerk reaction of trying to associate whatever artsy stuff we’re experiencing to something within us, our experiences, emotions, whatnots and what we’ve learned from others through time but that tends to lead to the stereotypical visions Susan describes in her quote.
a more challenging yet much more interesting and enriching approach is to try to wipe the mind’s eye slate clean before any artsy encounter and maybe stab it with a spoon if it won’t listen.
if we can manage to do this, we may still like or dislike or feel ambivalent about whatever it is but at least that opinion will be as close to our own as can be. anyhow, this empty lake made me think of a witty wet dream…

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Mystery Casting Pond X

this little farm pond has had many names in the past. it started as Mystery Pond X but that’s so common it was regularly confused with all the other Mystery Pond Xs around the globe so i had to get a little creative.
it used to have stocked rainbow trout in it so Lake Trouto seemed to make sense, at least in a non-confusing yet highly mindless and tacky way. the owner, a very kind, gentle and very old man whose nose is the same colour and size as a basketball stopped stocking trout a while back and the ones that where left-over eventually turned into food for furred, winged and slimy two-legged creatures but there had always been grass and common carp in there so Trouto turned into Carpo.

Lake Carpo sounds cool but after ten or so, yes, ten or so years… i’ve yet been able to properly hook one of these scaled giants. i did foul hook a grass carp whilst targeting trout years ago but it broke off the tippet in about as much time as it takes to say Lake Carpo three times really quickly. the carpers out there will scoff at my lack of success but that’s something i can live with. i’ve caught plenty of carp but just never in this little ghost carp pond-hell and that’s ok too because maybe that’s what will make Carpo so memorable.

next up was the small yet always fun and forever beautiful perch that seemed to thrive in there. i’d had several 50+ perch landing days with a personal best of 76 but they seem to have teleported themselves wherever it is that perch teleport themselves. i almost forgot, at that stage the pond of course took on the Lake Percho nomenclature. normal.

i’m probably wrong but for the moment i consider this pond to now be fishless to the point where i still go regularly to practice my casting but don’t even bring any flies to not be distracted if some fish happened to magically appear.
you got it, things go full circle so in a fit of total lack of renaming creativity, this little cutie has a new name:
Casting Pond X.

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this is the back view at CPX. funny, i’d never noticed how beautiful it could be…

Fly Tying- the Chammy Worm

” Some like it and some don’t ! “

too bad for the ‘don’t’ crowd because for the ‘do’ers’, this simplest among simplest to tie flies is also one of most catchiest there is because almost every fish you’d care to catch on a fly rod happily eats worms: ’nuff said.

notice how the beadhead/chamois skin combo is positioned towards the rear 2/3rds of the hook shank, this helps (a little) in preventing the chammy skin from wrapping around the hook whilst casting. what really helps most in that regard is to keep casts short and mostly to use Oval/Elliptic/Belgian two-plane casts for thes bugs just as one would when casting flies that have limp materials extending behind the hook gape.

fishing-wise, real worms get regularly washed into river systems during storms or heavy rains so the obvious time to use their imitations is after a spate but we all know that worms catch fish anytime and anywhere so…

apart from the hook and thread there’s only two materials, a beadhead (optional) and the most important element to get the all-important wormy goodness; real chamois skin or more correctly, chamois leather.
substitute synthetic ‘skins’ may seem ok when they’re dry but the wormy goodness of the real skin really gets its effect when wet. it’s even slimy to the touch ! (if that doesn’t get your fishing fingers twitching you might as well take up golf. or curling).
i somewhat regulary see these skins in the auto parts section in stores (these skins are par to none in getting a spotless finish on a vehicle after its been washed) but they can also be found on Amazon, Ebay, etc.
they’re not the cheapest of tying materials but a portion will easily make hundreds or more flies, maybe an expense to share with mates.

once again, ’nuff said. enjoy !

Reflect,

“is the classic experience that most anglers have when they get out on the water alone, with fly rod and fish and nature in its solitude. A magic window of time and space opens up for pure reflection.”

can’t disagree with that. subtitled ‘Women in Fly Fishing’, all i see is a fisher having a really nice day, not someone who’s trying to look like they’re having a really nice day, and that’s really nice.

a Griffith’s Gnat variant

here’s a seriously interesting emerger offshoot of the infamous G-Gnat.
created by Blue Ribbon Flies and demonstrated by Tim Flagler at MidCurrent, this little bug should do the do and do it well anywhere there’s teeny-tiny midges coming off and dancing about the surface. this one’s in size 20 but the basic idea in various tones and sizes to match your local bugs are sure to raise some trouty interest.
maybe its just me as it took me a little while to figure out the G-Gnat component in this pattern but fly names are fly names and its always good to respectfully attach a variant to its original, and said component happens to be: a very volume-reduced few turns of grizzly hackle over a short peacock herl thorax. those few turns are good enough for me and i’m positive, more than enough for a hungry fish. enjoy !