Fly Tying Tip and Tricks- Threading a Bobbin Holder

by Martin Joergensen at The Global FlyFisher

we’ve had several great tips from Martin in the past and here’s another that just might alleviate a bit of frustration when at the tying bench. not all bobbin holders are created equal and threads will all have different properties making for a different threading process dependant of what we’re using.
getting to this seemingly simple result isn’t always as simple as it might seem… bobbin threading GFF

with several methods and just about everything one might need to know on this bobbin holder threading subject, here’s another most tiers don’t know yet that i can imagine becoming the norm in the future: dental floss threaders.
floss threader GFF

click either image to access the complete article. thanks again Martin !

Tuesday’s ShoutOut- the UKFlyDressing forum

UKFlyDressing or UKFD, has been since i signed up six years ago my favorite fly tying forum among the crowd.
always friendly, unpretentious and with a very rich assortment of fly patterns, step-by-steps, tying tips and you name it goodies to keep the fly tier of all levels learning, creative and more efficient.
the highly read here on TLC, Dennis Shaw’s fantabulous A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial is just one of the gems we’ll find on UKFD, i’ve included another lovely below this introduction.

the forum has been a little slow lately. apart from wanting to share a great source for my readers i’m also hoping that at least a few of you will like what you see and feel inclined to join up yourselves and share your ties and knowledge with the rest of the community and keep it alive and thriving for years to come. just in case: don’t be put off by the UK bit, its an international community making it rich and diversified. dig into the various sections deeply, you’ll find more than a few treasures.

you’ll find the main page HERE  but check out this great thread control/twist tutorial first. enjoy !


Don’t get in a Twist by Tango

The majority of threads have a clockwise twist. For a right handed tyer when you wrap the thread around the hook you put another full twist in for every turn taken around the shank. This tightens or cords the thread even more. You must learn to use this to your advantage i.e. when tying in materials/whip finishing/making a rib from thread.

No twist in thread
spin1

Wrapped to bend and a twist in there, not much but it affects the behaviour of the thread.
spin2
If you leave the twist in and try and take a soft turn over the materials the thread will want to lie to the right, this makes it difficult to get the thread where you want it.
spin3
Spin the bobbin anticlockwise and it takes the twist out, this make the thread lie straight and it goes where you want it to.
spin4
You can also spin the bobbin more to put an anticlockwise twist in the thread, this makes the thread lie to the left, you can use this to make the soft loop over your fingers and slide the thread down to the tie in point.
spin7

Why bother?
If you leave the twist in there and whip finish the thread bunches and knots, this usually results in the thread snapping and the whip finish coming undone.

It really does make it easier to tie in materials.

When to take the twist out?
Before tying in materials, whip finishing, splitting thread for dubbing and when you want the thread to lay flat – this reduces bulk.

Exceptions?
Pearsall’s silk has an anticlockwise twist, to split this thread you need to spin the bobbin clockwise. There may be more.

When to put twist in?
When you “post” upright wings it will take fewer wraps than untwisted thread.
When making a rib from thread, you won’t see a flat wrap.

For a left handed tyer it does the opposite, it takes the twist out of the thread, with some threads this can weaken it.

There is also two types of thread, BONDED and UNBONDED, bonded thread (i.e. Uni-Thread) will not lay flat but still suffers from the effects of twist. Also bonded thread will not split so you cannot use it for split thread dubbing technique, MP Magic tool techniques etc.

 

Fly Tying- Setting Hair Wings

by Roger Lowe via Brookings’ Anglers

unfortunately, this video suffers of poor image quality but the very clear, concise and extremely well explained and pleasantly twangy instructions on this technique more than make up for the constant blur.
the tutorial is based on the infamous Royal Wulff patern but the same winging technique will do the do for a whole host of other flies from the more traditional types such as the Catskill school to more contemporary floating patterns such as this little Honey that’s caught me so many fish. Honey has a synthetic wing but the tying process is basically the same.
explore, try out but mostly, enjoy !

Fly Tying- How to apply dubbing

clear, concise with all the finer details, Hans Stephenson‘s basic dubbing application tutorial is primarily geared towards the beginners in fly tying but a lot of ‘seasoned veterans’ might just pick up a thing or two as well.
although the dubbing material used in the vid seems to be of the ‘super-easy to apply’ type, note that this method will tame the more difficult materials such as adult seal fur, just to name a what-can-be toughy. enjoy !

for the most complete of all completest dubbing tutorials be sure to check out previously posted Fly Tying: A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial by Dennis Shaw whom i’d like to take the occasion to thank again for sharing such an amazing work with us.

How to properly crush hook barbs: Part Two

we’ve recently seen the how-to video and today, sent in by friend Alan Bithell is a detailed explanation why it’s way better to crush barbs with the pliers inline with the hook point rather than across. thanks Alan !

De Barbing

for more of Alan’s goodies previously contributed to TLC so far click here enjoy !

How to properly crush hook barbs

great stuff from ozarkflyflinger with very little to add. i can’t explain why but having the pliers inline with the hook point gives better results with fewer breaks of the barb and a smoother contact between the tip of the barb and the shank.
don’t forget the small pliers-small hook / big pliers-big hook ‘rule’ or you’ll either damage your pliers and/or get mediocre results. one last thing, be sure to apply smooth pressure and not some hard and quick squeeze.
personally, i only tie with factory barbless hooks because the hook design is almost always better at holding fish on than with ‘standard’ designed hooks with crushed barbs but this trick is always good to use when friends give me flies. enjoy !

Fly tying – One handed whip finish technique

A technique developed as part of a fly tying class at Walter Reed Army Medical Center delivered by volunteers from the Potomac-Patuxent Chapter of Trout Unlimited

kudos to the TU crew for finding a simple, easy and brilliant solution to help disabled tiers whip finish their flies. please share !

i just had to go try this and it works very well. after a half-dozen finishes the only semi-issue i had with this technique was that since i make tight wraps to have a secure knot with as few wraps as possible, sometimes the weight of the bobbin/forceps ensemble wasn’t heavy enough to pull through at the end but using a metal spring clip instead of the forceps did the trick.
clamp

as an alternative, instead of doing a regular whip finish another simple and very strong method is, once the fly completed, pull the bobbin holder down a bit and apply a drop or two of superglue evenly on the thread a few millimetres from the hook, wind a few turns and trim off the tying thread flush. simples !