the Perfection Loop knot- Again and again and again and again

the Perfection loop knot has been featured here on TLC more than once. we’ve seen the basic knot and two versions of how to use it as a free-swinging tippet-to-fly junction. one would think that that more-than-enough covers the subject but, Tim Flagler via MidCurrent once again found not only a better way to show us how to tie this standard every angler should know but what really caught my attention is the forth ‘again‘ of this posts’s title: the tippet-to-fly knot that starts at 3:56 in the clip below.

what sets this one apart are the clear and simple techniques used to finely adjust the loop’s size, it’s really a no-brainer that’s super-easy to get right every time and no-braining and getting things right every time allow us to think of more important things while out on the water. things such as chocolate, coffee and maybe even focusing more on why we went there in the first place, to (try to) catch fish. enjoy !

‘stuck between a rock and a soft place

yes, even if this was a small oil slick its still an oil slick and even if this happened in the canal by the house and not some pristine natural waterway its still pollution and we’re left with something that’s simultaneously extremely ugly yet still very beautiful…

ftlow petrol m.fauvet-TLC 14-9-15

for hundreds more (and mostly unpolluted) For the Love of Water images click the pic above.
as always, thanks for stopping by, i hope you have a fantabulous week !


kaleidoscope |kəˈlīdəˌskōp|
a toy consisting of a tube containing mirrors and pieces of coloured glass or paper, whose reflections produce changing fin patterns that are visible through an eyehole when the tube is rotated.
• a constantly changing pattern or sequence of objects or elements: the fish moved in a kaleidoscope of colour.
ORIGIN early 19th cent.: from Greek kalos ‘beautiful’ + eidos ‘form

one could (i would) argue that its a little strange, even unnatural to take one of nature’s most interesting components; asymmetry, and render it to a pretty base human concept; symmetric, but sometimes it works out ok as long as it doesn’t happen with any frequency. human concepts and trippy images or not, kudos to the Greeks for having created a beautiful word and for fish being just what they are, breathtaking.

kaleidofin fish portraits m.fauvet-TLC 9-9-15

for further and quite interesting thoughts on symmetry click HERE.

Steelheading and CutsieBear ethics

lovemilkshakethese little cutsie-things sure could use a Love Milkshake

and maybe check out some of the old tunes once in a while when the slurping’s over.

the Lady and her BUB

as in Louisa Runnalls’ Big Ugly Bug.

tied as-is in monotone fluoresciness makes it an all-out attractor pattern and even though it’s bound to catch buttloads of fish, this thing will nevertheless bring out a few urgggggs from the die-hard imitative-or-die freaks but i encourage the straight and narrow to read on.
now then, let’s take the exact same BUB pattern and shift the colour scheme to say, an assortment of browns or olives and we end up with something that looks like it was born on Earth; perhaps a drowned caterpillar that somehow grew two antenna/leg things on either end, somewhere between the brach where it fell off of and where the fish saw it in the water.
these unnecessary and unusual appendages combined with this fly’s perfect symmetry will without a doubt instil great curiosity and confusion in the fish’s micro-brains which in turn leads to the opened-mouth reflex we see amongst people at the supermarket when trying to decide between product A, B or Z,  which concludes this tirade and brings us to the old saying:
“if you can get a woman (or man) to laugh, he’s (she’s) halfway in bed”, if you can get a fish to open its mouth, you’re half way there…

 enjoy !

a Strung-Out and Wired Olive Spider

ok, there’s nothing strung-out about this spider pattern but i just like the way it sounds…

on to today’s nifty bug tutorial by Hans Weilenmann; a quick look at Mike Harding’s A Guide to North Country Flies and How to Fish Them (a reference book on this style of fly i highly recommend)  a guide to north country fliesreminds us that apart from a few style-deviant patterns, NCF’s are indeed wet flies but they’re generally unweighted and are designed to fish dead-drifted on, in or slightly below the surface but traditions are just like rules and rules and traditions are meant to be broken, bent, corrupted and distorted, at least in a fly-fishy sort of way so, just as Harding’s Brassie Boa, Brassie Midge, Woodcock and Red Brassie and Copper Wire Dun (that one’s really yummy) that also have a wired body instead of the traditional waxed or unwaxed thread bodies, Hans’ version takes the same route by adding a little tiny bit of weight to what’s normally a pretty weightless fly. this extra weight shouldn’t lead you to believe these variants will sink the flies to the riverbed because they don’t, specially if there’s anything more than a slow current. on the other hand, they will go just underneath the surface currents quite easily and also help to turn over a team of two or three flies when the wired spider is tied on as point fly. of maybe more importance, at least in my eyes, the wired bodies will automatically add a little bit of flashiness, something that will be of great use to us when the fish are in a flashy mood or when getting their attention when they’re in sleepy mode.

as always, Hans gives good tutorial and this one’s no exception and now its time for him to take over. enjoy !

Fly Fishing Tips and Tricks- Weight shift/Attitude adjustment

Davy Wotton needs no introduction. for me, he’s one of those few people that when he speaks and shares his wisdom, i’m all ears because those words are the fruit of many, many years of experience and always lead to not only learning something new but also a new mental approach to that particular subject and today’s ‘Attitude Adjustment’ does just that.
it’s not just a super-easy way to very quickly get our flies at the right depth but also gets us thinking about how flies move and how we can alter those moments during the drift or retrieve.

here’s just a few text tidbits to wet your appetite:

“There is no doubt that bead headed fly patterns have a place but not always. That said by a simple process the fly fisher can for the same fly pattern used have many options in so far as altering how that fly will fish and by what attitude or movement it can be presented be that dead drift or with animated movement such as fishing wet fly, soft hackles and streamers.”

Davy Wotton 'Attitude Adjustment'
“So here is the deal. l carry with me a box which contains tungsten beads of different sizes and colors, size of bead is of course related to the weight. Many of my fly patterns are not adorned with a bead head included on the hook shank.
l now have many options to change the fly by the addition of bead size and color, or number of beads used, more to the point by the addition of the bead to the tippet or leader above the hook eye it will cause the fly to fish hook up.”

click the pic to access Davy’s complete article. enjoy !
and HERE for previous articles on Davy’s wisdom posted here on TLC

ole’ MushMouth

this otherwise flopped-photo reminds me of a fantastic quote from one of my all-time favourite photographers and somewhat mentor as i had the fantastic opportunity of being one of his assistants years ago in Paris- Nick Knight.

” I think photography has been wrestling with a burden of telling the truth, which I don’t think it was ever particularly good at “

mushmouth trout m.fauvet-TLC 29-8-15
MushMouth was an eight pound plus bruiser with an appropriately nasty kyped jaw. circumstances decided differently, preferring to show us a different truth, one i find infinitely more interesting than the truth my eyes told me.

Palmering, Pilgrims, fly tying history, the Worm and the Plague

thanks to this great comment left by reader Phil Foster on yesterday’s brainwashem’ young- Julian’s Wouf-Wouf salmon fly in regards to my mentioning “in the fly tying world, ‘palmering‘ means winding a hackle around the hook shank, not pulling hackle fibres back before winding/palmering the hackle to the hook shank.”

palmerworm 3“Per “The Fly Fisher’s Illustrated Dictionary” authored by Darrel Martin…….PALMER
A forward-spiraling hackle, a running hackle, with or without stem gaps; also called a ‘buzz hackle’; any fly tied with palmer hackle. The tying technique of spiraling a hackle laterally along the shank or body of a fly; the hackled, artificial fly resembling the Palmer worm, dated 1651; an artificial resembling a Palmer-worm, a hairy, wandering tineid moth larva. The term ‘palmer’ comes from the wandering pilgrim-beggar or palmer, “… the Palmer got its name from the pilgrims who walked …to the Holyland in fulfillment of a vow. When they came back home they wore pieces of palm leaves in their hats to signify they had made that long journey and were called palmers….Because a caterpillar , with all it’s legs, does a lot of walking, it likewise became a palmer” ( Harold Smedley, ‘Fly Patterns and Their Origins'[1950]. The medieval Palmer wore crossed palm leaves to indicate his travels.” The Palmer Worm is a small worm covered with hair, supposed to be so called because it wanders over all plants”( Charles Bowlker, ‘The Art of Angling’ [1839]”

which got me to wondering about how the verb ‘Palmering’ originated (actually, i’ve been wondering about this for years but never took the time to do a little research…) and found some interesting if not mostly completely non-fly tying related results yet they’re all related to this very stylish and hairy bug. enjoy !


noun palm·er·worm \-ˌwərm\
Definition of PALMERWORM
: a caterpillar that suddenly appears in great numbers devouring herbagepalmer worm

“I have smitten you with blasting and mildew: when your gardens and your vineyards and your fig trees and your olive trees increased, the palmerworm devoured [them]: yet have ye not returned unto me, saith the LORD”

“Ancient Palmer Worm. THE Palmer-Worm, or Pilgrim-Worm, mentioned in Joel i. 4, and Amos iv. 9, was a voracious, hairy caterpillar, which was, with the locust, a scourge of the East. Even before it reaches the winged state it is very destructive, but after it attains that period, its ravages are terrible.”

“That which the palmer-worm hath left hath the locust eaten; and that which the locust hath left hath the canker-worm eaten; and that which the canker-worm hath left hath the caterpillar eaten.”

suffice to say, and for our fly tying purposes, even if it is somewhat amusing to see how our prickly friends where transformed into crawling, earth-sucking  Mothra-esque demons, we can completely ignore all this biblical stuff, safely continue our fly tying activities and sleep well at night knowing how the hackling technique got its name.
palmerworm 2 it’s a little sad to see such a lovely creature get so much bad press but in the end, we’re still around to admire its beauty and be thankful for inspiring early fly tiers to create what is one of the most basic tying techniques there is.