Fly Fishing tips and tricks- Repairing fly line coatings

some super-nice advice from Phil Monahan and Ted Leeson via MidCurrent

“Leeson recommends using adhesive to bond the exposed ends of the coating together and to the (undamaged) core. This is ultimately a temporary fix because the adhesive will eventually buckle, crack, or fail because of the constant bending and stretching that a fly line undergoes. However, if you only have to perform this operation a few times a year, it might be worth it.”phil monahan linerepair midcurrent
“1- Wash and dry the damaged area thoroughly.
2- Gently fold the fly line, so that the cut in the line widens, exposing the core.
3- Using the tip of a toothpick, apply a small amount of adhesive to the gap between the coating ends. Make sure some adhesive gets on both ends, as well as on the core.
4- Straighten the line to close the gap.”
and the article goes on and on including really solid methods to repair not just cracks but also areas of a line where the coating is missing over a larger area by using heat-shrink tubes, the always amusing fire element and even lightbulbs !

as for my own contribution to this subject i’ll start with a cracked coating experience that happened several years.
just as in the pic above, one day i noticed a crack on the running line just behind the line’s head on one of my ‘land-only’ practice lines. figuring that since its a form of plastic a little glue to fill the gap definitely wouldn’t hurt to extend this line’s life, at least for a little while. since all coatings are flexible it seemed pretty daft to use something like standard super-glue that becomes hard and inflexible when dried so i did an initial test with UV resin, Loon’s somethingorother i believe. once cured this resin remained flexible.

that’s all pretty straightforward but here’s where this little story becomes a bit more interesting and actually counters the “This is ultimately a temporary fix because the adhesive will eventually buckle, crack, or fail because of the constant bending and stretching that a fly line undergoes” quote above.
at the time i lived in a cabin in the woods. although there was a bit of lawn, most of it was impractical for fly casting so the main practice venue was the driveway and this driveway was covered with sharp gravel, the kind of stuff that loves to eat and wear down fly lines. i expected the UV ‘patch’ to come off quite quickly but after two more years of just about daily practice the line itself of course wore out completely but the tiny glue bump was still there doing its job. i’m still amazed how this half a drop worked so well.

call me cheap, an anti-consumerism eco-freak or whatever you want but i really don’t like throwing things away unless they’re completely worn out or don’t perform their function, specially when a quick solution is so efficient. something to think about if or when this happens to you.

enough babble, click the image for the complete article. enjoy !

Barrio Micro Nymph Fly Lines

something new, something very different, something exciting  !

by the description below we’ll see that this is indeed a specialty line not only because of its super-thin diameter but also that it is a parallel line with no taper. (that last part isn’t mentioned)
at first this might raise a few eyebrows but consider that when tight-line nymphing*, because of its heavier weight, any standard fly line outside of the rod tip is going to pull the leader butt down even just a little and this non-straight line between the rod tip and the flies means less control of the flies and less sensitivity to takes.
you’ll also notice that it doesn’t have an AFTMA rating because it wouldn’t make any sense because of this line’s specialty-specific design.
as with the competitors, if you’re looking for that special little edge to your nymphing and want to up your performance, this is the way to go.

* although probably not exactly new, i came upon the tight-line nymphing term recently, adopted it immediately and really love it as it englobes all the ‘Euro-Nymphing’ styles perfectly without having to go into the specificities of country, region or particular style; things that are all more than confusing even for Europeans, let alone the rest of the world…
Barrio Micro Nymph

The Barrio Micro Nymph: an ultra thin, lightweight fly line specifically designed for Tight Line Nymphing techniques.

The Barrio Micro Nymph line has been designed for Tight Line Nymphing techniques like Czech, Polish, French, Spanish, Euro-style nymphing, where longer rods and extra long leaders are used and the fly line is frequently barely out of the rod tip. It is not a fly line for conventional casting techniques.

Our stealthy semi opaque, pale olive coloured Micro Nymph line has a level profile of 0.55 diameter, which conforms to current international competition rules. We have developed new micro diameter line technology for this application that is unique to the Barrio brand. Finding the balance between a stiffer line that helps to avoid sagging between rod rings and from the rod tip to the water, yet supple enough to minimise memory, has not been easy at this diameter. It required lengthy research and development.

We experimented with high visibility tips to the line, but feedback from anglers was that they preferred the simple stealthy colour and to build indicators into their leader set-up at a point which suits them and the conditions of the day.

click the image to order yours.
sold for 27£ and as all Barrio products, the prices include free worldwide shipping. be sure to check Mike’s other fly lines for more ‘conventional’ fishing and casting competition specific lines, Barrio reels, super-fine wooden fly boxes and other yummy goodies HERE.

Speycasting in Slow Motion

at about a year old this video by Eoin Fairgrieve isn’t exactly new, but ! what fly fisher could tire of seeing such great spey casting filmed so well ? not this guy.

be sure to watch it in full screen, enjoy!

Eat Sleep Fish, Happy Birthday and How to Lose your Flies in Trees

quite a special day today,

is three years old ! and a really nice three years its been.

Pete Tyjas, founder of ESF always pushing on to give us monthly fly fishing accounts from around the world from anglers of all levels in Pete’s For free and not for profit manner, something that’s really close to my heart. just as the link says in its title, you’ll find no boring advertisements, sponsors or commercial anything on ESF, just good ‘ole tales on casting, travels, tying, thoughts on fly fishing and all the other lovelies that englobe our passion.

on a personal note, i’d already contributed to ESF a while back with a piece named Poetry, Grace, Fluidity and the S.R.B. and was delighted to be invited back for this special anniversary, this time a little something on the tricky mind games that can happen when we aim our back and front casts, target acquisition and conscious target disregard while still keeping the target in mind all the while upping our game at: How to lose your fly in trees

click the ESF logo to access this month’s edition and ‘the snagged one’ for my little contribution. enjoy !

Fly Casting- The lowdown on Tailing Loops

Mysterious Creature by Aitor Coteron

very well and simply explained, this is the best i’ve read on the subject.
more than worth the read (actually, studied), Aitor’s article includes explanations, the how and whys of Tailing Loops backed up with the help of gifs and video. this is a must for any fly fisher of any level.

“Tailing loops have the aura of a mysterious creature. Currently we know pretty well how they are generated but, at the same time, we can’t help to surprise ourselves when we get a tail now and then, no matter how experienced we are.
Aitor's Tailing Loop
I mean that when casting for perfect loop control in mind I will immediately detect any error in the stroke, my hand will easily feel any deviation of its intended straight line trajectory. The view of the fly leg getting out of plane in relation to the rod leg at the latest stages of the loop life does nothing but confirm what I already knew before stopping the rod: that I had messed up the stroke.” 

click the gif or HERE to access the complete article. enjoy !

Fly Casting Secrets

or, what maybe used to be secrets but aren’t any more.

in fact, a lot of those secrets are now more than questionable but thats why i find this old gem from Jim Green filmed in 1975 to be just that: a gem to look at and listen to and be analysed by not just casting instructors but casters of all levels as there’s a little something to learn for everyone.
since i brought up ‘questionables’ here’s two and i’ll leave the reader/viewer to find other inconsistencies or whatever if such is your calling. i obviously don’t mean any disrespect.

- the Drift by “opening up the wrist” is called Rotary Drift and its rotating/domed/convex movement automatically opens up the loop by pulling the rod leg down.
its alternative is the Parallel Drift where the rod tip is drifted straight towards the unrolling loop. this movement lengthens the casting stroke, prevents the caster from creeping forward and all the other goodies one can get from drifting without changing the line’s course. easy to see which one’s better. more on the Drift from the Tim and Steve Rajeff bros HERE.

– point two is a bit subjective but its one i can’t stray from when analysing fellow casting instructors and it doesn’t have anything to do with what is being explained but how an instructor conveys the message.
to be honest, i can’t remember most of my teachers but the ones i do remember all had one thing in common; enthusiasm and they made it a contagious enthusiasm that got us interested even in subjects that where typically more than boring to us kids. i’ve seen far worse than Jim’s performance and he’s not bad at all, its just that he reminds me of teachers that drone on monotonously and also feel the need to include “you must” and “you have to” to get their point across instead of finding a way to teach without giving orders. i don’t expect fly casting instructors to put on a show or appear fake but i guess i expect them to at least look like they’re enjoying themselves because when they do, they transmit that enthusiasm and learning then becomes a joy and not a chore. i hope this will be taken as constructive criticism, a little something to keep in mind for anyone who shares our passion of fly fishing to others and not just a random rant.

enough ! here’s some vintage casts. enjoy !

as a side note, almost the exact rod and reel Jim’s using hangs on my wall doing what it does best: sitting pretty and doing nothing because to be honest, apart from being a physical, concrete memory of a wonderful moment in my life as a fly fisher, its not really good at anything else.
fenwick
nevertheless, its my first ever fly rod, a 7′ 6″ 5wt and one that i won in a fishing contest from the Fenwick company itself when i was thirteen after having caught an eight pound largemouth bass with a popper on a borrowed rod. every few years or so i take it out for a cast or two and put it back where it belongs but the joy of having won it is still as strong as forty-one years ago.
who knows, since he worked there designing rods and such, it might have been Jim himself who decided to award me with this treasure. whomever it was i thank deeply because even if its not used, this rod and its history has kept me fly fishing ever since.

Rod Cam: a medley of Spey casts from the butt’s perspective

nifty to watch and quite informative if we’re interested in seeing how rod blanks behave when they’re at work.
with a variety of casts such as the Double Spey, Snap T and Snake Rolls, we’ll also get to relive the beautiful, angelic symphonyish sound of a loop-to-loop connection being pulled into the rod guides. its all good, enjoy !