J.P.’s Single Spey

J.P. asked me to help him out with his double-hand casting in preparation for a salmon trip to Russia. being the sporty type (rugby), he’s quite in tune with how his body works but for us casting instructors, we know that the brain-order/body-movement correlation can be a long process… and sometimes not.
here’s his upstream, non-dominant hand-up Single Spey after ten minutes of explanations and demonstrations of what is generally considered the most difficult of Spey casts. sure, there’s a few things to smooth out and work on but he’s ready to safely fish.
as my UK mates say, i’m properly chuffed and very much look forward to seeing the progress he’s made since. casting instruction days are always a treat and this one was one of the treatiest.

JP SingleSpey beginnings

 

a Wind Knot in the making

by Takashi Kuwahara

always fun, inspiring yet somewhat whimsical at least at first viewing, Takashi’s drawings are also often food for thought.

outside of being a delightful drawing, today’s image shows us a caster that has multiple problems, the least being that he’ll most likely end up with knot(s) in his leader and a messy presentation because there’s slack from the line hand all the way to the fly but more importantly because this is a serious safety issue, his casting plane is still on his right shoulder even though there’s a hard wind blowing onto it. this is one of the best ways to wear a hook.
hopefully it’s a barbless hook and this guy will work on the Five Essentials of Fly Casting in the near future…

wind-knot in the making - Kuwahara

brainwashem’ young- Robyn

from grandpa Stuart Longhurst

“Next champion coming on… 3 year old Robyn showing her mum and dad what a distance cast is.”

too cute !

Robyn 5wt (1)mamma Silja had just taken both gold medals in the 15 and 16 foot Spey categories in the recent Swedish Championships and with dad Lasse Karlsson being several times Danish champion and all-around über-caster, its pretty safe to say her future looks more than bright.
Super-Silja !

Perfecting your English, fly fishing-casting-tying course with Carlos Azpilicueta and Marc Fauvet in northern Spain

i’m very happy to announce the first in a series of collaborations with Carlos Azpilicueta and this one has a nice twist: perfecting your English over a four day course fully immersed in a fly fishing environment.
Carlos’ text being Spanish, the rough translation below should give you a pretty good idea what this course is about but don’t worry if you’re not Spanish because we’ll be speaking English exclusively anyhow… :wink:
you’ll find Carlos’ email address at the bottom of the page for more info and reservations. hope to see you there !


carlos fly boxA really new and unique in concept with a limited number of participants where I’ll combine my two passions both related to teaching: English and Fly Fishing.
Having already spent thirty years teaching English, the last 10 have been devoted to working with professionals to help them develop their capabilities and skills applied to the business world.

What exactly is this course?
It is a unique experience of four days living together in a great setting while performing various activities in English while engaged in mountain fishing, fly casting and fly tying.
Ingles-4
Who else will teach you?
Participating throughout the course I’ll have the help of an expert in two areas: English and fly fishing. Marc Fauvet, US born fly casting, fishing and fly tying instructor and grandísmo guy. me

Where does it take place?
In Piedrafita of Jaca – Pyrenees Mountain, Spain. A truly luxurious stay in an absolutely stunning setting.

And will I improve my English?
Definitely. English will be the only communication tool (as well as gestural) as we all live together throughout the course.
We’ll have all kinds of activities depending on the level and needs of the participant. Simulations, roleplaying, analysis of information and a lot of conversation.

What level of English must i have to participate?Ingles
From beginner to advanced. The level determines the type of activities that will take place in English but does not alter the intensity or effectiveness of the experience.

What kind of fishing activities
take place?
Guided fishing for trout and salvelinus in low fishing pressure high-mountain environments. General fly casting practice and other preparations first thing in the morning for the day’s fishing as well as everything related to fly tying, equipment and entomology according to taste and level of fishing participants defined in advance.

Will there be time for everything?
Summer days are long. Four days give a lot of possibilities if they are well organized and the objectives have been clearly established.

Ingles-3

For more information and reservations contact Carlos Azpilicueta at carazpi@gmail.com
if you need translation help with the text boxes above let me know in the comments section.

Fly Lines- Cleaning and Maintenance

by Tim Flagler via Rio

” Hmm, feels nice, is it a new line ? “
” sort of, its about three years old… “

a direct quote from a course i gave last week and one that seems to repeat itself very regularly.

constantly amazed at how few fly anglers actually clean and treat they’re lines, hopefully a little encouragement followed by two detailed and well explained how-to videos will help reverse this habit and here’s why you should.

let’s start with the bad:
– casting with dirty lines just simply sucks. they make scratchy sounds as they go through rod guides. those scratchy sounds we hear are friction.
friction hinders sliding through the guides and increases friction when the line slides against the blank in-between the guides. this friction makes for jerky over-powered casting instead of the silky smooth casting which should always be our goal.
all this friction gets compounded when hauling and if the lines are sticky enough, it makes the return on a haul next to impossible and this means we introduced slack in the system when we where trying to get rid of it.
as you’ll have also guessed, all this friction greatly hinders line shooting and all this grit and gunk wears down rod guides and of course the lines themselves at remarkable rates.
see ? i told you it sucks. big time.

- dirty floating lines don’t float well, sit lower on the water surface or can actually sink, specially towards the thinner tip. this really sucks too.
the gunk that accumulated on the line prevents the surface tension thing from happening and it slowly goes under.
in the case of nymphing where we watch the line tip we don’t see it anymore and when fishing a floating fly, when we get a strike the extra ‘stick’ caused by the line tip and leader butt being underwater really helps in missed hookups because of instead of the line being instantly pulled up in a straight line from fly to rod tip, the rod end of the fly line goes upwards towards the rod and there’s a level, more or less horizontal portion (the stick) and then another downward angle between line stick and the turning fish.

multiple suck ! not only we had a harder time presenting the fly properly but also put the odds against us when its time to hook up, all ending in the inevitable dork/angst expression typically seen on anglers when this situation occurs !

ok, now for the good:
clean and treated fly lines cast wonderfully. in fact they cast better than straight-out-of-the-box lines because they aren’t treated at the factory…
take all of the negatives written above and reverse them. it’s as simple as that.
a line that’s in good shape, clean and treated flatters your casting and allows the angler to focus on the main goal: fly presentation and hook up.

Tim’s video is as always great. note all the detailed explanations and you can’t go wrong.
tip- if you have a double kitchen sink, then its even better and easier than buckets !
there’ll be a few more tips at the bottom of the post but for now here’s the vids. enjoy !

- house-hold use micro-fibre cloths work better than those little pads regardless who makes them. i always have this one on my chest pack and among a bunch of it’s other possible uses, when i’m finished fishing i retrieve all the line that’s been used through the cloth and this removes any gunk before it has time to dry on the line. it takes like five extra seconds to do this and delays trips to the sink/buckets maybe tenfold.
line rag- the hardest part is finding the right recipient but when you do, a little pad soaked in line dressing stuffed away in the chest-pack gets a gunky or slowly-sinking line tip and leader butt back in shape in a minute when on the water. just pull the line in and run it through the pads. done.
line treatment swab- and lastly, Scientific Angler’s line treatment gel is the best i’ve found and used so far regardless of fly line brand its applied to. it stays on longer and doesn’t need to be dried or wiped down again before using the line again. i’m sure Rio will forgive me…