Brandlin’

Alan Bithell has already contributed several treats on TLC and on today’s wormy menu we have another yummy:

brandling |ˈbrandliNG|
noun
a red earthworm that has rings of a brighter color, often found in manure, and used as bait by anglers and in composting kitchen waste.
[Eisenia fetida, family Lumbricidae.]
ORIGIN mid 17th cent.: from brand + -ling.

Odor
When roughly handled, an Eisenia fetida exudes a pungent liquid, thus the specific name foetida meaning foul-smelling. This is presumably an antipredator adaptation.

and here’s the beast but the best news is this one catches a lot of fish because just about every fish loves to eat worms and maybe more importantly, this one doesn’t exude anything, not even stink…

Brandlin' 1

lead foil being optional, apart from the hook and thread, there’s only two ingredients:

Brandlin' 2rubber stretch skin and a protective finishing coat of your preference.

as noted in the text, the only challenge here is getting the stretch skin’s tension right. play around with this a little and it’ll be spot on in no time. besides, if it doesn’t look right, simply unwind and try again.
click either image for the complete article on Alan’s site Crackaig Flies, enjoy !

Fly Tying- Everything you’ve always wanted to know about Organza

Get your Ojo working by Nick Thomas via Eat Sleep Fish

Ojo 1
the title basically says it all. Nick’s most excellent and comprehensive tutorial includes preparation of the organza strips, Ojo 2to mixing different coloured strips, to detailed sbs’s of three different patterns with plenty of tips and tricks along the way, to ideas on combining this material with others, to etc, etc, etc.
this is Ojo’d Organzan bliss.

click either image to access the complete article on Pete Tyjas’ Eat Sleep Fish, one the nicest, most unpretentious online fly fishing mags there is. enjoy !
austin-powers-cocktail-glass-4900072

Black Beaver and Cock

‘A fly no angler should be without is a small black midge. Summer or winter you will always find them on the water, and so will Mr. Trout.
The beauty of midge patterns is that they don’t need to be complicated, a bit of dubbing and a hackle is all that’s needed.
Stick one on anytime you can’t see what the fish are taking, chances are it’ll work.’

black beaver & cock

and i couldn’t agree more with Dennis Shaw. these sweet little simple to tie and unpretentious things do good and do good really good.
at first it might seem like a spider but it isn’t. the cock hackle keeps this pattern in the surface film with the body/hook-bend hanging down and the whole thing’s appearance when fished looks similar to an open umbrella in the same manner as emerging midges do when trying to break through the water’s surface tension.

the bug above is on a straight shank size 20 hook but on bigger patterns i’ve found great success using light wire grub style hooks. when sitting in the film, real midges are are twisting and turning so i guess the curved hook reproduces this profile a little more realistically. with teeny-tiny hooks my thought is the hook bend itself reproduces this curved body but then, once again, that’s just a guess.

a very sweet and just as effective just-under-the-surface variant to Denis’s Black Midge would be to replace the cock hackle by just a turn and a half of hen hackle and fish this spider on a degreased dropper attached to the bend of the hook of the dry. a double treat !

click the image above for the materials list and complete sbs on UKFlyDressing and be sure to check out their homepage for hundreds of other groovy flies. enjoy !

as a reminder, Dennis Shaw is the author of the seminal A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial. if you haven’t seen this yet you’re in for a real and unique treat.

Roy’s Flat Spent Mayfly Spinner

yet another lovely-lovely bug and step-by-step by Roy Christie

flatspentspinner R. Christie

“This is another cabin-fever fly, the result of sitting down with a notepad, drawing what we want the trout to see; then building it in a useable form.
This and many of my other working flies come from this process.
Concept flies may eventually become working reality.
This fly will always land gently, right side up and can be easily presented on a sunk tippet.
Build it from materials chosen to match your local fall of spinners.
The fly is built on a curved hook of your choosing, which is cranked about twenty degrees toward the tyer, a quarter way back from the eye. It is dressed round the bend to get the tails to support the weight of the hook shank over the greatest possible area, so it can be dressed sparsely.”
very astute thoughts there showing us what creative and effective fly design is all about: studying the naturals, the prey, how the imitation should ‘behave’ upon presentation and do its job of enticing that prey.
a fly designed to catch fish, not inspired by what other tiers have done but one inspired by trout.

to access the step-by-step and learn how to tie this little cutie click the image.
for more of Roy’s flies previously posted on the Cobra click here. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Setting Hair Wings

by Roger Lowe via Brookings’ Anglers

unfortunately, this video suffers of poor image quality but the very clear, concise and extremely well explained and pleasantly twangy instructions on this technique more than make up for the constant blur.
the tutorial is based on the infamous Royal Wulff patern but the same winging technique will do the do for a whole host of other flies from the more traditional types such as the Catskill school to more contemporary floating patterns such as this little Honey that’s caught me so many fish. Honey has a synthetic wing but the tying process is basically the same.
explore, try out but mostly, enjoy !

Fly Tying- How to apply dubbing

clear, concise with all the finer details, Hans Stephenson‘s basic dubbing application tutorial is primarily geared towards the beginners in fly tying but a lot of ‘seasoned veterans’ might just pick up a thing or two as well.
although the dubbing material used in the vid seems to be of the ‘super-easy to apply’ type, note that this method will tame the more difficult materials such as adult seal fur, just to name a what-can-be toughy. enjoy !

for the most complete of all completest dubbing tutorials be sure to check out previously posted Fly Tying: A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial by Dennis Shaw whom i’d like to take the occasion to thank again for sharing such an amazing work with us.

Trout Fly Design: The Avon Special step by step

you may remember this little Avon Special beauty from a while back: one of Roy Christie’s signature upside-down, reversed mayfly emerger patterns.
avonspecialat the time we where treated to a lovely article based on this fly’s particular design and even though i still have a few that Roy had personally tied and offered me, what was sorely missing was a step-by-step but it turns out that there is one so, here goes my friends.
note that this emerger pattern sits on the surface film by only the hackle, the wing is used as a sighter for the fisher while the rest of the body is submerged, hook shank and eye angled down at a 45° angle. as such, apply floatant only to the hackle and wing and wet the abdomen to help it go subsurface on the first presentation. don’t forget to degrease the tippet !

avon14click either image for the complete sbs on FlyAnglers Online. enjoy !
avon22