Fly Tying- Everything you’ve always wanted to know about Organza

Get your Ojo working by Nick Thomas via Eat Sleep Fish

Ojo 1
the title basically says it all. Nick’s most excellent and comprehensive tutorial includes preparation of the organza strips, Ojo 2to mixing different coloured strips, to detailed sbs’s of three different patterns with plenty of tips and tricks along the way, to ideas on combining this material with others, to etc, etc, etc.
this is Ojo’d Organzan bliss.

click either image to access the complete article on Pete Tyjas’ Eat Sleep Fish, one the nicest, most unpretentious online fly fishing mags there is. enjoy !
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Davie’s Black Cricket

Davie McPhail’s been recently upgrading a lot of his youtube tying videos to HD and as we say here in the south of France:
‘zat’s f’n great’ !!!
so, to celebrate this high definition, on today’s menu we have a lovely and quite crunchy-munchy Black Cricket
Black Cricket

note that “It’s Bill Skilton’s Stretchy Foam that I used and not Thin Foam as I said in the video, sorry….” and as you’ll see in the video and even if it might not be the easiest thing to find, this particular foam is absolutely perfect for this type of patter. something worth hunting down.
otherwise here’s the recipe to make this too-cool bug.

Hook, size 10 dry fly
Thread, Uni 8/0 black
Tail, Dyed Black Turkey or Goose Biots
Body, Bill Skilton’s Stretchy Foam and Black Dubbing
Back, Bill Skilton’s Stretchy Foam
Legs, Dyed Black Turkey Biots and a Dyed Black Cock Hackle
Thorax Cover, Black Foam
Head, Black Dubbing
Horns, Dyed Black Pheasant Tail

and here’s the beast. enjoy !

on a personal note, the tier can certainly go and finish the fly just like Davie’s doing but apart from some long-stranded dubbing to tidy up the head at 8:40, i’d probably stop adding materials, whip finish and pull out the strands a bit to imitate the short front legs of the crunchy black beauty. either way its all good.

the Definitive Clouser

as just about every single tying video by Tim Flagler, today’s infamous Clouser Minnow tutorial is one to bookmark and keep as a reference.
extreeeemely well detailed with special focus points to help us construct a strong, effective and fish-attracting fly. this is a real gem, enjoy !

Fly Tying- Setting Hair Wings

by Roger Lowe via Brookings’ Anglers

unfortunately, this video suffers of poor image quality but the very clear, concise and extremely well explained and pleasantly twangy instructions on this technique more than make up for the constant blur.
the tutorial is based on the infamous Royal Wulff patern but the same winging technique will do the do for a whole host of other flies from the more traditional types such as the Catskill school to more contemporary floating patterns such as this little Honey that’s caught me so many fish. Honey has a synthetic wing but the tying process is basically the same.
explore, try out but mostly, enjoy !

Fly Tying- How to apply dubbing

clear, concise with all the finer details, Hans Stephenson‘s basic dubbing application tutorial is primarily geared towards the beginners in fly tying but a lot of ‘seasoned veterans’ might just pick up a thing or two as well.
although the dubbing material used in the vid seems to be of the ‘super-easy to apply’ type, note that this method will tame the more difficult materials such as adult seal fur, just to name a what-can-be toughy. enjoy !

for the most complete of all completest dubbing tutorials be sure to check out previously posted Fly Tying: A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial by Dennis Shaw whom i’d like to take the occasion to thank again for sharing such an amazing work with us.

How to properly crush hook barbs: Part Two

we’ve recently seen the how-to video and today, sent in by friend Alan Bithell is a detailed explanation why it’s way better to crush barbs with the pliers inline with the hook point rather than across. thanks Alan !

De Barbing

for more of Alan’s goodies previously contributed to TLC so far click here enjoy !

chironomid pupae detached

by Davie McPhail
there’s about fifteen gazillion midge/buzzer/chironomid patterns out there and just about all of them severely lack what’s probably in my opinion the most important trigger that might attract fish to an emerging midge: movement of the fly’s body itself.
as we easily see in this video midges continuously wiggle-squiggle in the same manner that squirmy spermies squiggle when they’re homing in !

even if most buzzer patterns are tied on a curve hook shank that shank is rigid. basically, they look like dead and stiff bugs. that in itself isn’t so bad because fish love to eat stillborn or spent bugs but it seems pretty obvious that anything moving is going to attract more attention than something being still.

so, as you’ve guessed, the micro-chenille extended body is what’s going to make this pattern more lively than others as this material gets all limp and wimpy when wet just as the marabou breathers will. Limp is good !!!
this limp goodness should be specially good when the fly is fished either static or with a very slow retrieve but then, the originals squirm no mater what kind of water they’re in.
i’m not sure how the coloured tag of Davie’s pattern fits in with the natural (it doesn’t) so, even though it may add yet another exciter-trigger its probably a good idea to skip this step on some flies and have a mix of both versions in the box ready to go.
note that as explained in the video, the junglecock gills can be replaced by biots, a strip of flash or whatever else that looks like a bump. enjoy !