chironomid pupae detached

by Davie McPhail
there’s about fifteen gazillion midge/buzzer/chironomid patterns out there and just about all of them severely lack what’s probably in my opinion the most important trigger that might attract fish to an emerging midge: movement of the fly’s body itself.
as we easily see in this video midges continuously wiggle-squiggle in the same manner that squirmy spermies squiggle when they’re homing in !

even if most buzzer patterns are tied on a curve hook shank that shank is rigid. basically, they look like dead and stiff bugs. that in itself isn’t so bad because fish love to eat stillborn or spent bugs but it seems pretty obvious that anything moving is going to attract more attention than something being still.

so, as you’ve guessed, the micro-chenille extended body is what’s going to make this pattern more lively than others as this material gets all limp and wimpy when wet just as the marabou breathers will. Limp is good !!!
this limp goodness should be specially good when the fly is fished either static or with a very slow retrieve but then, the originals squirm no mater what kind of water they’re in.
i’m not sure how the coloured tag of Davie’s pattern fits in with the natural (it doesn’t) so, even though it may add yet another exciter-trigger its probably a good idea to skip this step on some flies and have a mix of both versions in the box ready to go.
note that as explained in the video, the junglecock gills can be replaced by biots, a strip of flash or whatever else that looks like a bump. enjoy !

White Trash and a Puss

two great new vids from the guys at Gink&Gasoline

first up and another fine example of “one of those bread and butter, no real need to stray from the basic design fly/streamers”, Garner Reid’s White Trash has everything a baitfish imitation should have.
proportions, profile, a combined mix of opaque and translucency and of course the necessary (imo) sexy-seductive action of the bunny fur strip to make it come alive even when not retrieved or affected by current. as a bonus the dumbbell eyes also gives it an up and down jigging action. a fine variant leading to a different swimming action would be to not add the dumbbell and glue on plastic eyes instead.

tie them in different sizes and colours to match your local baitfish and you can’t go wrong. simples.

and now for a trippy puss. enjoy !

be sure to regularly check out the G&G blog. it’s one of the best out there.

the CDC Bubble Sedge

cdc bubble sedge d. mcphail
here’s a fine example of a must-have trout fly. just like Frank Sawyer’s Pheasant Tail Nymph, in the sense that the basic design is just about the only style of nymph one would ever need, the CDC Bubble Sedge has everything an adult caddis imitation should have: shape, colour, proportions, a sense of transparency, buoyant and lively materials and simple to tie.
just like the PTN, tie these in different sizes and eventually in different colour tones and maybe a touch of green or orange to imitate the female’s egg sack to match the local bugs and you can’t go wrong. enjoy !

Fly tying – One handed whip finish technique

A technique developed as part of a fly tying class at Walter Reed Army Medical Center delivered by volunteers from the Potomac-Patuxent Chapter of Trout Unlimited

kudos to the TU crew for finding a simple, easy and brilliant solution to help disabled tiers whip finish their flies. please share !

i just had to go try this and it works very well. after a half-dozen finishes the only semi-issue i had with this technique was that since i make tight wraps to have a secure knot with as few wraps as possible, sometimes the weight of the bobbin/forceps ensemble wasn’t heavy enough to pull through at the end but using a metal spring clip instead of the forceps did the trick.
clamp

as an alternative, instead of doing a regular whip finish another simple and very strong method is, once the fly completed, pull the bobbin holder down a bit and apply a drop or two of superglue evenly on the thread a few millimetres from the hook, wind a few turns and trim off the tying thread flush. simples !

Fly Tying Tips and Tricks- Staying organised

(or at least, a little more organised…)

i wish i could give credit to the originator of this great tip but it’s just one of the random gems that pop up now again on the net that i save as a reminder for my personal use that i thought i’d share here for all.

straightforward and as simple, cheap and efficient as it gets, the first tag end of the material wound is slipped near the metal spring to keep it from spinning around and the rest is self-explanatory.
i use this for yarns, chenille or other non-fly tying specific materials such as found in sewing or crafts shops. if needed, you can write the materials specifics on the clothespin’s handle.
i hope this will be of use, enjoy!

clothespin keep:spools

Scott’s Squidro

ok, he’s pushing sales but if we overlook that we’ll find lots of nice, interesting ideas on streamer design and construction in this video by Scott Howell via LeLandFly

“A cousin to the now-famous intruder fly, the Squidro features rubber legs instead of ostrich herl, a modification that accounts for its unrivaled durability and downright irresistible action in the water. With a slim profile, the Squidro sinks to swinging depth in a hurry, lengthening your swing to increase your chances of hooking up with deep-running fish.”

geared towards Steelhead, in different colour schemes and in different sizes i can’t imagine them not being equally effective on larger river browns and rainbows and even salmon. (and largemouth bass, and zanders, and pike and maybe salty fish and, and, and… )

here Scott ties a black and blue version. be warned, the video’s 28 minutes long. who knows, this might be fly fishing history’s longest-to-tie fishing fly ever !

and to push this fly to the ultimate Geekdome Fly-Hall of Fame, here’s ‘Anatomy of a Squidro‘ for the techies. enjoy (and get Squidy) !

Lady Compara

a low-in-the surface egg laying Adams Comparadun by Davie McPhail

some most excellent and inspiring craftsmanship in this just-out tying tutorial. i particularly liked the details of the wing and tail and going back through the wing fibres with the dubbing body to splay out the deer hair.
this one’s a real gem, enjoy !