Fly tying – One handed whip finish technique

A technique developed as part of a fly tying class at Walter Reed Army Medical Center delivered by volunteers from the Potomac-Patuxent Chapter of Trout Unlimited

kudos to the TU crew for finding a simple, easy and brilliant solution to help disabled tiers whip finish their flies. please share !

i just had to go try this and it works very well. after a half-dozen finishes the only semi-issue i had with this technique was that since i make tight wraps to have a secure knot with as few wraps as possible, sometimes the weight of the bobbin/forceps ensemble wasn’t heavy enough to pull through at the end but using a metal spring clip instead of the forceps did the trick.
clamp

as an alternative, instead of doing a regular whip finish another simple and very strong method is, once the fly completed, pull the bobbin holder down a bit and apply a drop or two of superglue evenly on the thread a few millimetres from the hook, wind a few turns and trim off the tying thread flush. simples !

Fly Tying Tips and Tricks- Staying organised

(or at least, a little more organised…)

i wish i could give credit to the originator of this great tip but it’s just one of the random gems that pop up now again on the net that i save as a reminder for my personal use that i thought i’d share here for all.

straightforward and as simple, cheap and efficient as it gets, the first tag end of the material wound is slipped near the metal spring to keep it from spinning around and the rest is self-explanatory.
i use this for yarns, chenille or other non-fly tying specific materials such as found in sewing or crafts shops. if needed, you can write the materials specifics on the clothespin’s handle.
i hope this will be of use, enjoy!

clothespin keep:spools

Scott’s Squidro

ok, he’s pushing sales but if we overlook that we’ll find lots of nice, interesting ideas on streamer design and construction in this video by Scott Howell via LeLandFly

“A cousin to the now-famous intruder fly, the Squidro features rubber legs instead of ostrich herl, a modification that accounts for its unrivaled durability and downright irresistible action in the water. With a slim profile, the Squidro sinks to swinging depth in a hurry, lengthening your swing to increase your chances of hooking up with deep-running fish.”

geared towards Steelhead, in different colour schemes and in different sizes i can’t imagine them not being equally effective on larger river browns and rainbows and even salmon. (and largemouth bass, and zanders, and pike and maybe salty fish and, and, and… )

here Scott ties a black and blue version. be warned, the video’s 28 minutes long. who knows, this might be fly fishing history’s longest-to-tie fishing fly ever !

and to push this fly to the ultimate Geekdome Fly-Hall of Fame, here’s ‘Anatomy of a Squidro‘ for the techies. enjoy (and get Squidy) !

Lady Compara

a low-in-the surface egg laying Adams Comparadun by Davie McPhail

some most excellent and inspiring craftsmanship in this just-out tying tutorial. i particularly liked the details of the wing and tail and going back through the wing fibres with the dubbing body to splay out the deer hair.
this one’s a real gem, enjoy !

Winged Wets- Two contrasted versions

both classics, both at the extremes of fly profile volume yet both equally effective.

to start off, a lovely paired waterhen winged Iron Blue Dun from Davie McPhail for when the fishes want something big(ish).

and a beautiful and very sparse Clyde-style Teal and Black from Peter McCallum via Magnus Angus / Fly Fishing and Fly Tying for when they’re into eating the smaller/thinner delicate morsels.

for more wet flies previously posted on TLC click here. enjoy !

tying a Catgut Caddis Pupae

remember these catgut lovelies ?
catgut nymph
catgut nymph Lucian Vasies close-up

well, today’s a fly tying double-celebration day !

firstly, it’s Lucian Vasies‘ first video tying tutorial (congrats mate !)
and secondly (well, it ties in with the first point so its not really a a firstly/secondly thing but it sounds good ?..) anyhow, here’s how to tie this oh-too-yummy-to-resist caddis pupa starring über-cool and realistic catgut/biothread that you can get directly from Lucian here.

tip: catgut needs to be soaked in water for 10 or so minutes before tying. since it dries up when stored, this makes it soft and flexible and very easy to wrap around the hook shank. plus, we get to see exactly how the fly will look when it’s wet and fishing: transluco bug-sexy !

btw, in case you’re wondering, this is what an aubergine looks like.
(some might call it an eggplant) Aubergine

Fly Tying- Working with Tinsels

 Is your body sexy ?

Does your body look like this?..

lumpy-bodyYes?

Would you like it to look like this?…
smooth-body-13

Yes?
Well the good news is you don’t have to go on a high protein diet or jog 10 miles every night! You don’t need special tools, skills or materials.

The bad news? Well there’s none. There are no secrets or special techniques required, it’s all down to common sense.

and common sense indeed is all it takes to get a nicer, stronger, better looking fly: starting off with a good foundation, using the right materials to keep it all in proportion and just taking the time to do it all well to be happy with the final result.
for more on how to easily achieve this with either metal or plastic tinsels but also with other materials such as Floss/Flexi-Floss, Herl, Biot and quill bodies click HERE for yet another fantastic tying tips tutorial on UKFlyDressing. enjoy !