The Wariness Scale – part 1

by Carlos Azpilicueta

one of the more interesting fish-behaviour concepts i’ve ever come across, an ever-present approach i’ve adopted no matter what species or water-type fished.
this goes a lot further than the simplistic and typical “Pattern vs Presentation” that most authors have re-hashed over centuries. something the dedicated angler should most definitely consider to add to their ‘bag of tricks’.

”  Imagine the following situation: a brown trout feeding near the surface in front of you. Moreover, it’s large (this requires some imagination). You have the perfect imitation. You know that because, during previous hatches of this same species, this pattern worked consistently. With a careful, accurate cast, you make a perfect presentation. Drag-free, it drifts into the trout’s window at the right place at the right time. Everything is perfect. It couldn’t be better. But… (now you don’t have to imagine anything, just remember the many times you’ve experienced this) it doesn’t take your fly. So, what do you do now? You tie on a different fly, and then another and another. You lengthen your leader to see if it’s that darn micro-drag. You carefully move into a different position and cast at a different angle. Zilch.

During the two last seasons, I’ve verified that there is one more parameter that we generally don’t take into account or we simply don’t pay enough attention to. Consequently, we don’t deal with it as something separate from the other two. I’m referring to the trout’s degree of wariness in such a critical situation as feeding on the surface. Conditioned by a heap of circumstances, the trout passes through states in which its feeling of security or awareness of vulnerability vary constantly. These states enormously condition the trout’s willingness to take your fly, independently of the pattern or the presentation.”

click HERE for Carlos’ complete article.
Part 2 will follow shortly, enjoy !

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