Brandlin’

Alan Bithell has already contributed several treats on TLC and on today’s wormy menu we have another yummy:

brandling |ˈbrandliNG|
noun
a red earthworm that has rings of a brighter color, often found in manure, and used as bait by anglers and in composting kitchen waste.
[Eisenia fetida, family Lumbricidae.]
ORIGIN mid 17th cent.: from brand + -ling.

Odor
When roughly handled, an Eisenia fetida exudes a pungent liquid, thus the specific name foetida meaning foul-smelling. This is presumably an antipredator adaptation.

and here’s the beast but the best news is this one catches a lot of fish because just about every fish loves to eat worms and maybe more importantly, this one doesn’t exude anything, not even stink…

Brandlin' 1

lead foil being optional, apart from the hook and thread, there’s only two ingredients:

Brandlin' 2rubber stretch skin and a protective finishing coat of your preference.

as noted in the text, the only challenge here is getting the stretch skin’s tension right. play around with this a little and it’ll be spot on in no time. besides, if it doesn’t look right, simply unwind and try again.
click either image for the complete article on Alan’s site Crackaig Flies, enjoy !

4 thoughts on “Brandlin’

  1. As brandlings are found in dung heaps and compost bins, not in the soil in general, what is the point in imitating them?

    • because fish love them… 😉
      besides, worms of all types and other assorted ‘ground insects’ get washed out in river systems in periods of heavy rains, floods, land shifts and whatnot. another perspective is to compare them to terrestrial insects that are considered ‘normal’ fly fishing imitations: ants, grasshoppers etc. they don’t come from the water but end up there in one way or another.
      either way, this all leads back to my first comment.
      cheers,
      marc

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