Fly Fishing tips and tricks- Repairing fly line coatings

some super-nice advice from Phil Monahan and Ted Leeson via MidCurrent

“Leeson recommends using adhesive to bond the exposed ends of the coating together and to the (undamaged) core. This is ultimately a temporary fix because the adhesive will eventually buckle, crack, or fail because of the constant bending and stretching that a fly line undergoes. However, if you only have to perform this operation a few times a year, it might be worth it.”phil monahan linerepair midcurrent
“1- Wash and dry the damaged area thoroughly.
2- Gently fold the fly line, so that the cut in the line widens, exposing the core.
3- Using the tip of a toothpick, apply a small amount of adhesive to the gap between the coating ends. Make sure some adhesive gets on both ends, as well as on the core.
4- Straighten the line to close the gap.”
and the article goes on and on including really solid methods to repair not just cracks but also areas of a line where the coating is missing over a larger area by using heat-shrink tubes, the always amusing fire element and even lightbulbs !

as for my own contribution to this subject i’ll start with a cracked coating experience that happened several years ago.
just as in the pic above, one day i noticed a crack on the running line just behind the line’s head on one of my ‘land-only’ practice lines. figuring that since its a form of plastic a little glue to fill the gap definitely wouldn’t hurt to extend this line’s life, at least for a little while. since all coatings are flexible it seemed pretty daft to use something like standard super-glue that becomes hard and inflexible when dried so i did an initial test with UV resin, Loon’s somethingorother i believe. once cured this resin remained flexible.

that’s all pretty straightforward but here’s where this little story becomes a bit more interesting and actually counters the “This is ultimately a temporary fix because the adhesive will eventually buckle, crack, or fail because of the constant bending and stretching that a fly line undergoes” quote above.
at the time i lived in a cabin in the woods. although there was a bit of lawn, most of it was impractical for fly casting so the main practice venue was the driveway and this driveway was covered with sharp gravel, the kind of stuff that loves to eat and wear down fly lines. i expected the UV ‘patch’ to come off quite quickly but after two more years of just about daily practice the line itself of course wore out completely but the tiny glue bump was still there doing its job. i’m still amazed how this half a drop worked so well.

call me cheap, an anti-consumerism eco-freak or whatever you want but i really don’t like throwing things away unless they’re completely worn out or don’t perform their function, specially when a quick solution is so efficient. something to think about if or when this happens to you.

enough babble, click the image for the complete article. enjoy !

16 thoughts on “Fly Fishing tips and tricks- Repairing fly line coatings

  1. Polyurethane is incredibly resistant to wear. Quite the opposite to PVC. I know it first hand cause my late father made his living in the plastics industry and I myself worked on it several years.
    Mots lines are made of PVC, most repairing glues of Polyurethane.

    To my knowledge the only line manufacturer using PU is Airflo.

    • hey Aitor,
      for sure. the line i repaired was sold in France by JMC (therefore with another name) but it must have been an Airflo.
      what’s the PVC / Polyurethane glue correlation you mention ? or are you saying they’re not compatible ?

  2. I repaired one of mine last year with glue but it was right in the middle of the rod guides when I held line for my distance. The constant ticking through the guides was annoying and I wouldn’t think good for my rod guides. Tried heat shrink that was worse. Line is now free to good home.

leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s