brainwashem’ young- Julian’s Wouf-Wouf salmon fly

today’s super-duper tying treat come to us from young Julian Furlaga and be sure to remember that name because i’m very certain we’ll be seeing a lot more from him in the future.
very well tied and explained * and pleasant to watch, Julian’s most excellent tutorial not only shows us how to tie a great salmon/migratory fish pattern but also that these patterns don’t require a rocket science or brain surgery degree to tie; a barrier a lot of adults seem to have a hard time climbing over…

this tutorial’s special and be sure to notice how the lad put on his special Sunday shirt to make the video, enjoy !

* in the fly tying world, ‘palmering‘ means winding a hackle around the hook shank, not pulling hackle fibres back before winding/palmering the hackle to the hook shank. i’m sure Julian will have sussed that out soon.

3 thoughts on “brainwashem’ young- Julian’s Wouf-Wouf salmon fly

  1. Hi Marc,
    Per “The Fly Fisher’s Illustrated Dictionary” authored by Darrel Martin…….PALMER
    A forward-spiraling hackle, a running hackle, with or without stem gaps; also called a ‘buzz hackle’; any fly tied with palmer hackle. The tying technique of spiraling a hackle laterally along the shank or body of a fly; the hackled, artificial fly resembling the Palmer worm, dated 1651; an artificial resembling a Palmer-worm, a hairy, wandering tineid moth larva. The term ‘palmer’ comes from the wandering pilgrim-beggar or palmer, “… the Palmer got its name from the pilgrims who walked …to the Holyland in fulfillment of a vow. When they came back home they wore pieces of palm leaves in their hats to signify they had made that long journey and were called palmers….Because a caterpillar , with all it’s legs, does a lot of walking, it likewise became a palmer” ( Harold Smedley, ‘Fly Patterns and Their Origins'[1950]. The medieval Palmer wore crossed palm leaves to indicate his travels.” The Palmer Worm is a small worm covered with hair, supposed to be so called because it wanders over all plants”( Charles Bowlker, ‘The Art of Angling’ [1839].

    Hope that satisfies.

    Regards, Phil

    Like

    • that’s excellent, Phil. thanks !
      i had previously briefly seen the religious and Palmer worm references in the dictionary when checking to see if the verb ‘palmering’ was used for other activities besides fly tying but this historical reference is rather special and i’ll include it in coming article.
      hoping you have a great day,
      marc

      Like

leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s