brainwashem’ young- Oscar

just in from papa Campbell:
“Our season opened yesterday. I took Oscar out for a couple hours today as he had been asking me to go fishing. We stocked up on cookies (and left them in the car) and hit a small stream. (We had planned to go to the Clyde, but you need a passport photo for an annual license and we didn’t have one….)
The fish were obliging, we had two on dries and three on numphs. We had another fall off. I think the picture I have attached of Oscar sums it all up pretty nicely.”

brainwashem young- Oscar TLC 17-3-14

it sure does, congrats little buddy  !

for a lot more kid’s smiles and the complete brainwashem’ young series click here

Mémé

Mémé in french is an affectionate name for grandma. her real name was Catherine but that name was for others. outside of always telling goofy jokes and stories and being a fervent and fantastic cookie baker, one of the things i remember most about Mémé was she used to like to come fishing with me.
although the photo shows her with a fishing rod, she rarely actually fished, i remember taking the image to record the occurrence. what she mostly did was sit there and knit and point out what a pretty cloud that one was, how to hold the fish without poking it’s eyes out and look up with her quirky smile and announce, “Oh darn, we forgot the cookies” ! but i knew they where safely hidden in the yarn bag.
i remember bringing this photo to school as part of the ‘What did you do during your summer vacation ?’ report we always had to do each year.

that year my family had rented a cabin on some lake in Wisconsin. the highlight of the trip, my mom being bit on the butt by a pike my dad had caught and thrown in the boat while she was sun bathing. as most fish do in this situation, it started flip-flopping unhappily about and i can only guess that the bite impulse came alive when it saw this soft pink thing in front of it’s mouth. i can’t blame it as i probably would have done the same.

Oliver Edwards demonstrates the Snap Roll Cast

part one of what’s going to be an ongoing series on the Roll Cast, it’s uses, what, how, why, when, debunking myths and etc and etc and etc, here’s Oliver Edwards demonstrating the Roll Cast pick-up or Snap as he calls it for fishing small streams and rivers. we’ll see later how this exact same method can be used just about anywhere.

most often described as a way to cast when there is little or no backcast space, i’ll be explaining the many other uses of the Roll Cast and if i manage to get some of those ideas across while suggesting how it’s a marvelous tool for just about any fishing situation from the high altitude to open sea, we’ll see that the idea of it being just for no-backcast room situations is really reductionist and that we might be missing out on something really useful yet very easy to do.

tying the Perfection Loop

this loop is ‘perfect’ for loop-to-loop line-to-leader or leader-to-leader connections for anything but the biggest of fish. super easy to tie, the loop stays in line with the standing end of the monofilament and not ‘kinked’ to the side as with a Double or Triple Surgeon’s Knot. to be honest, i’m not sure it really makes any difference in leader/fly presentation to the fish but it does because i believe it does. offset kinks look messy !

i really like this video by Jim Thielemann. rarely found on any step-by-steps or diagrams is the trick we find here of passing the line around the thumb to create the second loop. this keeps the whole knot visible with the loops separated as opposed to pinching the ensemble together and then trying to pull the second loop through the first to finalize/tighten the knot. this also makes for a better control of the size of the final loop.

turn around !

“You can’t feel, hear, smell or taste the quality of your back cast but you can see what happens.”

today’s quote by Bernd Ziesche

an old saying in casting instruction is “The quality of the front cast is conditioned by the quality of the back cast”. the back cast is 50% of a full casting cycle which means it’s just as important as the front cast. the back cast is also something that as far as i can find out, and i’ve been searching for several years, is the only activity where we throw something behind us. our physiology and activities are based on what’s in front of us and we do that very well. however, since we’re not used to throwing behind, this is an area we want to work on using what we have. luckily, that what is probably our strongest sense, the sense we rely on the most, vision.
so, as Bernd so perfectly explains, if we want to improve our casting we need to know what’s going on behind us and the solution is as simple as learning to turn the head around to watch what’s going on but maybe more importantly, to confirm or not what we think is going on and thereon we can adjust what needs to be adjusted.

in case you’re thinking, “wait a minute, am I supposed to turn around all the time ? when i’m casting just a few meters ?” the answer is: obviously not.
just as when we start off fly casting and learn to do a straight line cast (and learn to no more do straight line casts just as soon as we learned how to do them !) this is a foundation exercise and these exercises are meant to build up our capabilities and senses and here’s the paradox: we want to develop the exact same senses Bernd said we couldn’t use !  this new learning and exercise needs a little time and regular practice. don’t practice it while fishing as it’s almost always counter-productive to practice and do the activity at the same time as we do neither well.

as for the pic, yup it’s me and yup it says FF&W, Jason Borger’s site Fish, Flies & Water but more on that later !