it is easy to preach fasting with a fully belly

adult chironomid – Languedoc Roussillon, France

 

How fish would see insects

if they had laser-scanning microscopic vision but perhaps luckily enough for us, they don’t, or otherwise they’d never be so easily fooled by our silly little flies… 😉

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midge pupae

“If you’ve ever wondered how a diving beetle swims through the water or manages to rest just on the surface, the answer is in part because its foot is infinitely more complicated than your own… The photos are made with a confocal laser-scanning microscope capable of “seeing” vast amounts of detail beyond what you might capture with a traditional lens-based microscope.”   trĂ©s groovy. for more absolutely amazing-mind-bending close-up bug imagery by Igor Siwanowicz click either pic above. enjoy !

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diving beetle a.k.a, our little friend the singing penis.

Sticky, stretchy, waterproof, the stuff that holds it all together.

cased caddis housings are simply fascinating. used for protecting their fragile abdomens, to conceal themselves among all the stream bed debris and as ballast, these seemingly simple-minded creatures are pretty ingenious to say the least. the documentary footage is excellent, explanations simple. interesting for fishers and nature lovers of all ages, be sure to share this with your little ones, specially if they’re into creepy-crawly bugs, enjoy !

Caeneus

“A young nymph loved by Poseidon. One day the god said he would give Caenis anything she wanted in token of his affection. She asked to be changed into a man, and an invulnerable fighter at that. Although this was the last thing Poseidon had expected or wished to hear, he obliged, and Caenis became Caeneus.

Under her – or rather his – new name, Caeneus became a great warrior and got so carried away with his prowess that he walked into the middle of town one day and propped up his spear in the marketplace.

“From now on, everybody,” said Caeneus, “you will worship my spear as a god.”

who would have thunk such a lovely creature would get its name from a soap-opera…

oh, boy ! there’s no way that’s going to turn out well for the pompous, spear-weilding, newly-named Caeneus trans.

click here for the rest on Mythweb.com, enjoy !

Isonychia-ing

Isonychia Emerger from Matt Grobert  via Tightline Productions

Isonychia… cool name.

torn somewhere between the desire to go fish these critters in their home waters and lavishly repeating that word in some lovely redhead’s ear, i guess for today we’ll (well, i’ll… ) have to just enjoy this creature and tying video from afar.

Primarily an East coast, Midwest (US) insect, this rather handsome emerging ‘Slate Drake’ pattern is simply awesome by it’s simplicity, sturdiness and general profile. in a sense, a mayfly is a mayfly is a mayfly and as such, by changing colors and sizes, the basic pattern will make an all-over all-around great emerger for any waters.

as always, the Mat Grobert/Tim Flagler team make an excellent tutorial displaying excellent technique and know-how well worth paying special attention to.

 ” Their nymphs are among of the fastest-swimming mayflies in the world. They can power their way through fast riffles with ease, and their imitations should be fished with fast twitches.

They are unique among mayflies in that they have extra tuft-shaped gills at the base of their fore legs, a structure normally found in stoneflies. ”

images and nymph quote from TroutNut.com. be sure to click either pic for more info on this sexy bug. enjoy !

stoned dead

which sort of describes how I feel at the moment but while I still have my shuck, this little guy’s a lot better looking than me.

here’s a first glimpse of my annual springtime Scottish tour that I hope you’ll enjoy.

“…then others just don’t fanny around…”

not a whole lot to learn or whoop and whap about but a 1:52 short little venture into Scottish river-side humour for your pleasure that’s bound to raise a few lip corners. the cheering ooohs and ahhhhs make it really special, enjoy !

Mayflies have two Penises

“Aquatic entomologists place little emphasis on body color when attempting to identify a mayfly species. They collect virgin, male, mayfly spinners, and dissect them to clearly see their penes (mayflies have two). They then count the spines on the penes and compare them to photos in books to identify each species. There is no way to be sure of the species from a female spinner, and you may not be able to tell from a nonvirgin male. No kidding! I couldn’t make this stuff up.”

see ? as seemingly far-fetched, mind-boggling, thought-provoking and mostly giggly because it’s not like these two thingies are going to double their pleasure..,  as much as i like to make up shit i didn’t make up this post’s title either.

seeing how some aquatic bugs breathe through their butts and then all the others do all sorts of other weird things, that one little fact (ok, two) doesn’t help us all that much if we’re trying to match a hatch on the stream but it’s all good to know because well, knowing is better than not knowing, it’s cool and this kind of stuff is just a reminder that fiction usually isn’t so far-fetched after all. the weird and mostly wonderful is all around us and it’s real.

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sometimes it’s a little confusing. can you name these bugs ?

Paul Weamer’s excellent article, Understanding Mayflies on Fly Fisherman -via Erin Block’s super-duper Tippet section at MidCurrent- doesn’t give us all the answers either but goes a long way in getting to know our little friends a little better.

click either pick to access the complete article and please excuse the fact that the main character in the second image isn’t a mayfly but hey, it might turn into one if you stare at it long enough… enjoy !

butter-belly Ben

is a funny little guy that stops by TLC headquarters once in a while. he doesn’t have much to say and I don’t understand his sign language and he doesn’t understand English or French or my own sign language.

we do however play ‘show me yours and I’ll show you mine’ so I pull up my t-shirt and show him my belly, Ben in turn does the same. I’m not sure what he gets out of our little exchange but I get to observe all his little details and not just groove on how cool looking my little friend is but also get to figure out what can make a great adult chironomid imitation and all that seen from below, the fish’s point of view. it’s a pretty good deal, I like this game.

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Two flies for Friday

just sent in by buddy Trevor Hayman, a Large Dark Olive spinner – Baetis rhodani
“Quite a few of these around on the (Southern England) chalk streams right now.”

Trevor Haymen Large Dark Olive spinner

this kind of ultra-lovely bug image gets me going in a good way. i wish i was on those chalkstreams right now but that’ll have to wait till next month so, to get in the mood i immediately went to the local cafĂ©, ordered a double espresso and got to work on making a few somewhat dark olive imitations for the trip. i’m feeling really positive about this one !

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thanks again Trevor !

‘caders

cicadai was just a little boy, not sure what year but i definitley recall a certain and very strong alarm or rather, worysome anxiety all around me at school, with family and friends and even on the news:

The CICADAS are Coming !!!”

we’d made it through the Bay of Pigs and the Beatles, we where getting the three daily number reports from Vietnam- US soldier death and injuries, and enemy death tolls and people where freaking out over a few goggly-eyed bugs. come on…

they did indeed arrive and it wasn’t just a few. i clearly remember hearing these things approaching something like 24 hours before they finally got to my neighbourhood. the constant droning was an equal mix of spooky-as and fascination and something that had this little boy all excited. adults had told us they where completely inoffensive, they didn’t bite, scratch or sting but you know, kids are kids and the grapevine had them depicted as blood-sucking demons that could enter your ears and nibble on your brains. even if none of that super-cool-grodey-exciting stuff ever happened, it’s enough to say that we all wore our winter hats pulled down low.

whether at school or at home we all where on ‘look up patrol’ eagerly scrutinizing the sky awaiting their arrival. the idea was that the first to spot one would phone the others of the gang to warn them of the devil’s coming but cell phones where only to be found in science fictions novels at that time and most of us didn’t even have permission to use the home phone by ourselves.

regardless, the creepy ‘cader things came. it was like sheets of big bug rain, they’d stupidly fall down the back of your shirt, splatter on windows and windshields, would slap you in the face as they zig-zagged about and where basically not so interesting after all and annoying as hell. and loud.

you couldn’t take a step with smooshing several, i can still remember the sound. throwing them at both other boys and girls to hear them squeel got old quick:  “once you’ve seen a million cicadas you’ve seen them all” or so i’d thought, until i found this fantastic short by Samuel Orr that depicts a complete lifecycle of these strange and crunchy creatures.

now, this film isn’t about fly fishing but then of course it is. i haven’t had the luck/oportunity/chance to be in an area when they’ve accomplished their every 17 year come out since i’ve been a fisher but its really high up there on the wishlist and that little boy’s excitement is still there but this time it’s with a purpose; to catch big-big trout who love to eat big-big bugs.

as always when fishing i’ll have a hat of some sort on but at least i won’t have to worry so much about having my brains sucked dry. i hope you’ll enjoy Samuel’s film as much as i did.

edit- no matter what i do the video starts at 1:15… this is a first and don’t know what to do about it. please use the slider to get the beginning. sorry.

Can you breathe through your butt ?

probably not and however much i try, i can’t either… but thanks to the inquisitive and coolnerdy group at Noticing we’ll find out how and why dragonfly nymphs do exactly that and other exciting things with their wiggly butts.

dragonfly-nymph-rocket

we’ll also get a pretty darn good explanation how mayfly and other nymphs manage to breathe whilst being underwater (something i’m already pretty sure none of you can do) and all sorts of nifty and fascinating things about our favourite bugs. mayfly-gills1wonderfully explained, this article is well worth sharing with your little ones as its yet another fantastic example of the marvelous, adaptive, fascinating capabilities of the animal world right there at our (wet) feet. they’ve found the perfect balance of easy-to-understand informative while keeping things light and humorous. the site is quite new yet they’re off to a fantastic start and i really-really wish them well.

to read more and see a video showing why dragonfly nymphs are next best thing after Alien and find out why all these grey beachballs are trying to prevent the red one from going out you’ll have to click on it to see. enjoy !

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November Caenis (or, doing three things at the same time)

multitasking is a stupid concept. i want to do several things at the same time knowing very well that neither one will be done properly as if it had been done separately but the unfocussed mind persists, considers it a challenge or whatever it is that confused minds like to find as an excuse so, i dumbly persist until i’m just about to completely delete the two product reviews i’m working on at the moment (super-good most-excellent stuff !) when this little guy stops by, raises it’s palm traffic-cop style and starts singing “STOP ! In the name of Love !…”  ummmm, doesn’t raise or say anything at all but sits there right purdy just long enough for me to grab the camera and take a quick pick before it takes off to resume its, ahhh… don’t know what to call it, pre-death fluttering-about ritual ?

’nuff said for today, i have a few things to do in a half-assed way, here’s the intruder. click the pic for more bugs and here for some completely inconsequential caenis info. enjoy !

window may m.fauvet-TLC 3-11-15