Our full potential is when we flow as one

beautiful images with an even more beautiful message, drink them down and let them flow through.

hookless fly-fishing

here’s a little something different from Lee Spencer, way different.

i can relate to Lee’s story as i used to live right next to a wee stream in the french Pyrenees that apart from making lovely gurgling noises, had a very healthy population of gorgeous native brown trout. they weren’t of course, but these where ‘my’ trout if you see what i mean. i’d go look at them every day to see how they where doing, dream off into that dream place that being streamside takes one and of course learned a lot about how they lived, behaved and interacted socially, some of them even had names.

by wee i mean that at this level the stream was often no more than one metre wide. being completely wild and untouched by man and with lush vegetation abound, the stream itself was more often than not a green tunnel with a flow. once the obstacles of actually getting an imitation into their feeding spots where figured out, this being a Bow and Arrow cast nine.nine times out of ten because that was the only possible solution, getting these beauties to take a fly was relatively simple, they didn’t know anything about fishing pressure and in their world things that look like food generally are food but hooking up quickly became a problem, something the Bow and Arrow cast only tactic might have alluded to; there was no room to move the rod up, across or down to fight and land the fish. at this point i was already getting into the ‘it’s more about the strike than the fight and land‘ frame of mind so, the idea of cutting off the whole hook bend of a completed fly came to mind and was perfect for this particular situation.
i got my strike thrill, the little fishies i loved so much never really knew what was going on and remained where they’re supposed to be and i could do all this without breaking any more rod tips…

of course, i’m not expecting a lot of other anglers to go fishing without hooks but it’s a little something to think about. like mentioned earlier, it’s different, enjoy !


“Back in 1998 Lee Spencer did two things that changed his relationship with the big steelhead of the North Umpqua River.
He agreed to become the first full-time FishWatch guardian of the Big Bend Pool on Steamboat Creek, where as many as 400 large steelhead spend the summer in startlingly plain sight after swimming up the North Umpqua to spawn.
And he started cutting the points off the hooks on his flies… “

actually, just the points:

pointless-fly
“Everybody thought I was crazy, To me the whole peak of everything is the strike or the boil. Everything after that is downhill. Especially if you have to wait a long time to land the fish.
When you get a fish on, you get a run and a jump and at the jump it will throw the hook. That was satisfying enough for me.”

-click the image for the complete article on Deseret News-

Cartoon fish

two short informative animated films for both young and older kids i hope you’ll enjoy and share with those around you.
first up, a concise description of the life cycle of Atlantic salmon. this one’s specifically about Scottish salmon but the principle is the same for any of our sea-going migratory fish around the world.

and secondly, a little reminder of just how precious a comidity water is. its not something we should take for granted and this, for kids of all ages.

previously posted articles on Conservation/Environment and Fish/Ichtyology

Didymo- Some new views

“For years, Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) has been on many states’ high-priority aquatic invasive species list. Didymo, a freshwater diatom, has the potential to bloom, forming dense mats on stream and river bottoms making recreational activities difficult and giving affected waterways an unsightly appearance. Didymo blooms began in Canada in the late 1980s, and have since occurred around the globe in places like New Zealand, Chile, and across the northern hemisphere.”

from here it looks like the same ‘ole river snot we’ve unfortunately been seeing here and there around the globe but continued research seems to point to what makes this algea tick: waterway phosphorus levels and more precisely, low phosforous levels.

didymo

it seems like alerting anglers and other water users to aquatic invaders such as Didymo, New Zealand Mudsnails and the parasite that causes Whirling Disease has kind of gone secondary but organisations such as flow are thankfully there to share information, remind us of these threats and how to do the right thing.

click the image above to acces the complete article and adjoining links and please share this with your angling friends. it’s not very exciting from a fun point of view but this stuf’s important.

River Deltas and belly-button Innies and Outies

these two have a lot more in common than most of us might think.

river delta belly buttons
superb and simply explained, this short clip from MinuteEarth gives us a really nice introduction to river mouth formations. whether we chose to use this info to maybe determine the better spots to fish around estuaries or just because its fun to see belly buttons and rivers is up to the viewer but i’m pretty sure your kids will get a kick out of the latter. enjoy !