ANNA

i’ve often been told that i like to think of dumb things but you know, thoughts that pop up are thoughts that pop up and while they can be pushed away sometimes (often) its fun to just let them run through and see what comes out if there’s anything to come out. one of those that leads nowhere is right there on that first tree trunk:

assuming its the name and not an acronym, who was she and what did she do to deserve this ?
did she like to fish the little mountain trout pond i like so much that’s just off-camera to the right ?
did she carve that herself or was her admirer/suitor a dwarf or of average height or even a giant that got on all fours to write those four letters ?
has she ever come back to reflect on whatever happened here years ago ?
might the roots be her grave and this lovely ash her tomb ?

i’ve no idea and don’t really want to know more but even if finding carvings on trees usually pisses me off, i’m grateful. grateful in the sense that those four little capitalized letters singled out this particular tree from the billions that surround it, made me stop and think, pull out the camera and, and, and… oh i don’t know, this is all pretty dumb but at least i like the pic and hope you will too. ANNA or no ANNAs, it’s a special place.

ANNA m.fauvet-TLC 8-5-16

Salmon ears, Sound and vibration in water, Fish Communication and Noisy noises

and a whole bunch of other really cool/interesting/thought-provoking/andjustplaingoodreading fishy-science facts from MCX Fisher via buddy Pete Tyjas’ always great Eat Sleep Fish ezine.

even if the only image in the article appears to be a cod,

codsalmon
based on Atlantic salmon research, MCX goes a stretch further on explaining and going into great detail (and be sure to follow the adjoing links !*) on, eh, there’s no way i can add any more info on this subject so here’s a few excerpts:
“The underwater sound environment is entirely different to that in which we live in air. Accordingly, when thinking about the underwater world we have to dump our experience and preconceptions. Simply, salmon don’t ‘hear’ like us, because they don’t have ears”

“The key features of sound in water are that it:
– Is about 800 times more intense than in air, because the water is incompressible and therefore a much more efficient transmitter. In addition the surface layer reflects sound back into the water.
-Travels far further than in air: relatively minor events are detectable at ranges measured in kilometres, but the level of background noise is relatively very high because it is drawn from a much wider area.
-Goes about 4.4 times faster.
-Is influenced by the composition of the water.”

So much, so interesting, but what is its relevance to the angler?
If certain frequencies can stimulate a salmon to attack oceanic prey, can we exploit this in fresh water? In thinking about this it helps to grasp what 300 Hz sounds like in air : for comparison Middle C is 261 Hz. It is certainly much higher than the dull thrum of commonplace line vibration in fast water, which is in the range 10-30 Hz.”

and lastly,
“The moment you step into a pool the salmon’s formidable sensors will detect your activity, even if you have felt soles and a light step. However, they don’t know it’s you or what you’re doing, because in evolutionary terms humans haven’t been angling long enough to achieve any genetic impact on salmon. Unlike the calls of whales, seals and other fish, salmon anglers’ noises aren’t in the salmon signal library. Certainly they wouldn’t be able to connect the crunch of your studs on the gravel and the clink of your wading staff on the rocks with the drama of being caught, except perhaps if they’d been caught shortly before by another heavy-footed fisherman.”

but there’s a gazillion more fascinating things to read on this noisy subject and to do so simply click the cod ! enjoy !


* and one of those happens to be a really geeky but eversocool Beeps, Chirps and Noise channel on youtube where i found this little brown noise treat ! (yeah, that’s sounds a little idon’tknowwhat but don’t be afraid, you won’t have to go clean up after listening to it… )

“Brown noise is noise with a power spectral density inversely proportional to the frequency squared. It decreases in power by 6 dB per octave or 20 dB per decade. The sound of brown noise mimics a waterfall or heavy rainfall.”

“Let the river take you, wherever that may be… “

sounds cliché but how cool is this ?

Sound recordist and Montana local, ‘Fishman’ Mike Kasic, has an unmatched obsession for the underwater wilderness of the Yellowstone River. In this 10 minute essay film, Mike swims the Yellowstone like a human-fish through swift river canyons, watching trout in fast currents filled with frothing water tornadoes, stopping only to body surf river waves.

Can you breathe through your butt ?

probably not and however much i try, i can’t either… but thanks to the inquisitive and coolnerdy group at Noticing we’ll find out how and why dragonfly nymphs do exactly that and other exciting things with their wiggly butts.
dragonfly-nymph-rocket
we’ll also get a pretty darn good explanation how mayfly and other nymphs manage to breathe whilst being underwater (something i’m already pretty sure none of you can do) and all sorts of nifty and fascinating things about our favourite bugs. mayfly-gills1wonderfully explained, this article is well worth sharing with your little ones as its yet another fantastic example of the marvelous, adaptive, fascinating capabilities of the animal world right there at our (wet) feet. they’ve found the perfect balance of easy-to-understand informative while keeping things light and humorous. the site is quite new yet they’re off to a fantastic start and i really-really wish them well.

to read more and see a video showing why dragonfly nymphs are next best thing after Alien and find out why all these grey beachballs are trying to prevent the red one from going out you’ll have to click on it to see. enjoy !
lonely-oxygen-400px

two baby birds and a billion droned Sockeyes.

here’s a five and a half minute hovering reminder of just how f’n amazingly beautiful and fascinating our world is.
breath it in deeply and don’t exhale. enjoy !

silence, real silence.

has become in my eyes (pun intended) the most precious commodity or perhaps put differently, the true meaning of luxury or even better yet: bliss.
by real i mean none, nothing, no sound whatsoever. no wind, no rippling water, no birds and even less man-made sounds: nothing.
i don’t get to experience total silence very often but when it happens its like being hit with a brick but this brick’s a nice brick. the kind that knocks back all distractions, increases awareness and the power of thought and as a side-bonus, it makes me all tingly.

the last time silence happened was a few months ago on a fishing trip to the Scottish Highlands. i was too busy doing the tingly thing at the time to even think of photographing silence besides, it’s not like it would show.
it didn’t happen in the scene below but for some reason this image reminds me of the moment but then, images can only be about the past and they rarely make sounds. maybe that’s why i like them so much.

silence m.fauvet-TLC 9-12-15

“frenetic bubble generation”

and

petrichor |ˈpeˌtrīkôr|
noun
a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather.
ORIGIN 1960s: blend of petro-‘relating to rocks’ (the smell is believed to be caused by a liquid mixture of organic compounds that collects in the ground) and ichor from Greek Mythology: the fluid that flows like blood in the veins of the gods…

frenetic bubbles and what’s one of the nicest smells there is. what’s not to like ?

“when raindrops land on certain porous surfaces, they can trap tiny air bubbles containing small particles, which then shoot upward, into the air. These aerosols are likely responsible for carrying aromatic elements, along with bacteria and viruses stored in the soil,”

for more on this phenomena and yet another aspect of the magic of water, take a deep breath and click HERE

there’s plenty of ugly

and plenty of beauty. here’s two examples of the latter to help balance out the first.

first up, Boreal Trouts‘ first film “A collection of underwater footage collected during the 2014 field season in Northeastern Minnesota” filled with babies, not-so babies and mature adult trout doing the rub-thing. yet another of these underwater river films giving us terrestrials an intimate vision of our little friends a million times better than any aquarium could.

and some magic from 3hund, this time not entirely natural but an awesome (yes, the term is justified for once) combination where man meets nature in a rare complementary form. maybe something we might see on the way to or from the river should we divert our eyes from the beaten path…

be sure to watch them in full screen and HD. enjoy !

River Pancakes

“The strange discovery was made by members of The River Dee Trust at a place called the Lummels Pool, at Birse, in Aberdeenshire. (Scotland)
River Dee Team biologist Jamie Urquhart said it was thought foam floating about on the water started to freeze and bump together, forming the discs.
The phenomenon can be found in rivers and in the open sea.
Mr Urquhart, who found and photographed the “pancakes”, said: “What we think happened is this – foam floating about on the water started to freeze, probably at night.
“Bits of frozen foam got pushed around in the eddy, and in the ensuing collisions became roughly circular.”
river pancakes BBC

yet another reason to always have a little bottle of maple syrup stowed away in your chest pack !

click the pic for more on this delicious phenomenon. bon appétit !

acorn pairs

acorn Island ftlow M.Fauvet:TLC 13-12-14
was out earlier today checking on water levels of some local streams, streams that are open year ’round and a more than welcome venue for when the trout rivers are closed. a series of heavy rainstorms have turned what are normally large rivulets maybe two meters wide at most into raging, brown, unfishable waters around five times their normal width and one metre higher but some of the effects of the bank overflows are quite interesting like this acorn gathering assembled by water that made me think of an aerial view of some exotic island.

the pairs part happened when i got back to the office and noticed this video. i like pairs.
http://vimeo.com/86362805?utm_source=email&utm_large=vimeo-digest-daily_digest-20140100&utm_campaign=9279&email_id=ZGFpbHlfZGlnZXN0fDkyYTlkOGVjNTNkMzkzNWY0Y2JhNTJjMTc5NDI0YjgyMzg4fDE4MDc3ODR8MTQxODM4NzI5MXw5Mjc5

Why do rivers curve ?

a lot of us learned this earlier on in our schools days but a little refresher course can’t hurt. apart from the cool factor and one of the explanations why our stream and river systems are so beautiful in their natural irregularity, anglers can use this great little film from MinuteEarth to help figure out fish holding areas, specially useful in times where they can’t be seen.
its all good, enjoy !