about the colours of beauty

be warned, this is amazingly beautiful. one of those natural wonders that keep us wondering. as for the colours, just let them seep in. enjoy !

be sure to visit myLapse‘s page for more filming excellence

Sticky, stretchy, waterproof, the stuff that holds it all together.

cased caddis housings are simply fascinating. used for protecting their fragile abdomens, to conceal themselves among all the stream bed debris and as ballast, these seemingly simple-minded creatures are pretty ingenious to say the least. the documentary footage is excellent, explanations simple. interesting for fishers and nature lovers of all ages, be sure to share this with your little ones, specially if they’re into creepy-crawly bugs, enjoy !

Real Gems

this is probably the most beautiful fish film i’ve ever seen.
no more words are necessary nor could they do it justice… enjoy !

remember the last time you where swimming in the sea at night,

the inevitable ‘duh-DUHHHHHH’ playing over and over in your head getting louder and louder further increasing the super-creepy yet i love it and i don’t care, that only happens to others feeling ?
well, you couldn’t see it but this is what was going on beneath you.

How trout take subsurface flies

this film is really interesting and not something we get to see very often.
the purists will moan and groan that this study was done on stocked fish using stocked fish flies but even if its ultimately possible, its also highly improbable that someone is going to go through all the effort and time to get the same footage on wild stock, besides, i don’t think it would make for a big difference. also, wild fish of the same size don’t tend to congregate so much, further decreasing the competitive agressivness seen in this video so, let’s just take from this what we can.
firstly, seeing fish attack flies is well, exciting. its one of the major reasons we do what we do. also, from a practicle aspect, this vid says a lot about how fast they’ll spit that fly back out; something we tend to not like as much !

i didn’t bother counting but what seems more than obvious was how fast the deer hair muddler-headed fly (the first in the series) was spit out. after viewing this several times there even seemed to be a panicked expression (i know, i know. that’s dangerous ground but please bare with me on this one, here’s my point)-
take a muddler head fly and hold it between your fingers; its prickly and stiffish and doesn’t feel like any ‘normal’ fish food and that leads me to this, at least for the moment, conclusion.
its not to say that muddlers aren’t great flies because they are but the spit-out rate and how fast its spit out ratio seems higher than with non-prickly adorned flies and this from what the purists are calling ‘dumb fish’…

fly no. 2 and 4, generic non body-hackled wooly bugger type lures (for lack of a better name) are kept in the mouth longer. had the hook point been there these would have produced more hook-ups because the angler would have had more time to react to the takes.

enough rambling, whether we come to any practicle conclusion regarding fly designs or not, its still something i’m sure you’ll enjoy watching.

stream pricks

they’re so cute, enjoy  !

“The brook lamprey is a fish that like blind larva lives in the stream bottom for most of his life, and see themselves only late in the spawning season. From the month of August a metamorphosis of the oldest lamprey larvae, which develop the animal eyes and genitals. From that moment, waiting for the first sunny spring days that do heat up the water. In spring everything is in the sign of reproduction, which only lasts a few weeks at the brook lamprey. If the stream prick ready to spawn, they die.” *

* yet another lovely achievement from the genius robotic mind of Google Translate.

be sure to check out blikonderwater‘s page for more super-nice underwater footage.