fly box leash TLC 26-6-13

Of waterproof fly boxes

and of the interesting things said about them on fly fishing forums.

– ” Been thinking about ‘waterproof’ fly boxes. The only real advantage I reckon is that they should float.
Otherwise this waterproofing stuff is just a method on how to ensure that moisture cannot escape the fly box. How to get nice and rusty flies if you don’t open your boxes to dry after getting home… ” *

– ” I know from experience. They have two advantages they can make your hooks rust faster, and you can watch them drift off on the current, rather than see them sink out of site! If you paint them bright orange, so you can see them better, you can see them float away into the extreme distance. 
The worst of all worlds are ones that only float for a short while. They drift off to where you can’t reach them, then sink. There is an inverse square law with the probability of loosing a box being dependent on the cost of the box and the time effort and expense put into filling it.
Not that I’m cynical about it at all ;)  ” *

i’m eager to see if anyone comes up with any solutions to this dilemma that aren’t overly complicated…
fly box leash TLC 26-6-13

* (names withheld to protect the innocent)

TwoMouthed Mikey

TwoMouthed Mikey

TwoMouthed Mikey

no, you’re neither hallucinating nor seeing a fish who can actually simultaneously open and closed its mouth. this dark and beautiful highland-like, yet caught in somewhat southern Scotish brown trout’s strange powers come not from the trout itself but from the stacked-focus macro thingy the fishing camera can do. in geek talk…

it takes about eight images that all later blend in together but since they’re  shot in sequence, those eight images need a lot more time than a standard one image so, if the subject moves during the exposers, the camera will register all the combined images similar to the trippy double/multiple exposures that where common before the digital era and thats for my eyes, a pretty darn cool thing to see pop up, specially when it ‘just popped up’ instead of being planned.

I’m having a great-great trip in Scotland this year and Mikey was gorgeous. this image doesn’t do it justice, specially in the Highland-like description I tried to give him above but just take my word for it please.

stoned dead

which sort of describes how I feel at the moment but while I still have my shuck, this little guy’s a lot better looking than me.
here’s a first glimpse of my annual springtime Scottish tour that I hope you’ll enjoy.

Angler Safety- Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

its nasty, scary stuff that’s just around any angler’s corner: the possibility of drowning.

geared towards children but equally valid for water goers of all ages, Mario Vittone’s most excellent article gleaned from many years of experience gives us the hows, whys and clues to look for.
this is something every single one of us should study and always keep in the back of the mind when near the water.

“How did this captain know—from 50 feet away—what the father couldn’t recognize from just 10? Drowning is not the violent, splashing call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew know what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” she hadn’t made a sound… “

here’s what it looks like in real…

click HERE for the complete article and take care out there.

Big-bird-NEW

Fly Tying- a CDC Yellow May Dun

by Davie McPhail

Big-bird-NEW

the Yellow May or, Heptagenia sulphurea is the Big Bird of the aquatic insect world. not so much i guess in the big sense, but it has weird globular eyes, its yellow all over, can be seen from kilometres away, is undoubtedly the easiest ephemeroptera species to recognise and everyone loves it, specially hungry trouts !
here’s how to make a really nice one so you too can be in the Cool-Yellow crowd , enjoy !

“…then others just don’t fanny around…”

not a whole lot to learn or whoop and whap about but a 1:52 short little venture into Scottish river-side humour for your pleasure that’s bound to raise a few lip corners. the cheering ooohs and ahhhhs make it really special, enjoy !

crazy chiro m.fauvet-TLC 3-6-16

Mayflies have two Penises


“Aquatic entomologists place little emphasis on body color when attempting to identify a mayfly species. They collect virgin, male, mayfly spinners, and dissect them to clearly see their penes (mayflies have two). They then count the spines on the penes and compare them to photos in books to identify each species. There is no way to be sure of the species from a female spinner, and you may not be able to tell from a nonvirgin male. No kidding! I couldn’t make this stuff up.”
see ? as seemingly far-fetched, mind-boggling, thought-provoking and mostly giggly because it’s not like these two thingies are going to double their pleasure..,  as much as i like to make up shit i didn’t make up this post’s title either.

seeing how some aquatic bugs breathe through their butts and then all the others do all sorts of other weird things, that one little fact (ok, two) doesn’t help us all that much if we’re trying to match a hatch on the stream but it’s all good to know because well, knowing is better than not knowing, it’s cool and this kind of stuff is just a reminder that fiction usually isn’t so far-fetched after all. the weird and mostly wonderful is all around us and it’s real.

crazy chiro m.fauvet-TLC 3-6-16
sometimes it’s a little confusing. can you name these bugs ?

Paul Weamer’s excellent article, Understanding Mayflies on Fly Fisherman -via Erin Block’s super-duper Tippet section at MidCurrent- doesn’t give us all the answers either but goes a long way in getting to know our little friends a little better.

click either pick to access the complete article and please excuse the fact that the main character in the second image isn’t a mayfly but hey, it might turn into one if you stare at it long enough… enjoy !

Fly Tying- a DIY knotted Leg Tool

i haven’t tried this yet but this little home-made gizmo found on In The Riffle’s Fb page gets a doubleplusgood for creativity and ingenuity. how does it stack up to pre-existing leg-knotting options is anyone’s guess which i suppose will be more down to personal preference rather than all-out efficiency but variety they say, is the spice of life or, as Americans would have us believe the popular (yet completely unheard of in France) french term: Vive la Différence !

Fly Tying Tools- the Bend-A-Blade

we don’t see new fly tying tool concepts very often but this just-out razor blade holder should make more than one deer-hair aficionado very happy. not only is it a razor holder to not have to hold it whilst trimming hairs (the squeamish don’t need to worry as they’ll still have the possibility of slicing their fingers when placing or removing the blade) but there’s also an adjustable slider allowing the user to repeatably adjust the amount of bend in the blade. neato !

click here to order yours at Dally’s Ozark Fly Fisher and watch those fingers !

friday's face caddis pupae M.Fauvet:TLC 29-8-14

Fly Tying- the Chroma Caddis Cutie

yes, i think this thing’s cute but more importantly, fish do too.
friday's face caddis pupae M.Fauvet:TLC 29-8-14

some would say that HackleAndWing‘s version of the not-so-new latex bodied caddis pupaepattern is a little overly fussy and i’d mostly agree. however, tying hard-core bread and butter fish attractors tend to be a simplistic and sometimes monotonous endeavor so, sometimes its nice to add a little fuss just for the fun of adding fuss.

extremely well explained with tons of details worth paying special attention to, the final result has all the trigger points, proportions and profile the real pupae has and is well, yummy to say the least. i hope you’ll enjoy.

10 foot Spiders

in the UK the ‘traditional’ way to fish Spiders/North Country Wets/soft hackles is upstream or across stream and that’s how i like to fish them best. it doesn’t have anything to do with the tradition aspect because i couldn’t care less about tradition but because this manner presents the fly(s) in a dead drift/natural way just as one would with a typical dry fly. from that perspective, the two, wets and dries are fished exactly the same, the only difference is the unweighted wets are either drifting  just under the water’s surface film on faster water or just a little bit deeper on slower flows.

Luke Bannister‘s great just-out video shows us the up and across on pretty slow water to sighted fish holding under the surface and not rising to eat. true to form, Luke’s videos are always in gorgeous settings with gorgeous trout, all to the soundtrack courtesy of some lovely little winged musicians: a real treat.
watch it to relax, get excited or to learn, whichever way, it’s all good. enjoy !