Stickman Rods

i’m very happy to announce the birth of a new fly rod company:
Stickman Rods

fly-rods

-from Akos Szmutni, founder and owner of Stickman Rods-

” Why would anyone establish a company in 2013 producing high-end fly rods when the market is flooded with great products? The truth is Sage, G-Loomis, Orvis, Winston, Thomas&Thomas, Scott and a lot of other companies build really nice rods we would happily fish any time.

That is a tough one to answer but with the help of our design team in Spain we are able to do things with graphite that only a few others on the planet can. Add the input, experience and craftsmanship of the manufacturing and the pro team members and we have the potential to build rods unique on the market. Research and development gave birth to prototypes that we thought were better than any other rods out there. So no matter how irrational it may have looked we had no choice:

We just had to… “ and i’m glad they did.

Alejandro Intern. Adelam meet
most fly anglers have never heard of Alejandro Viñuales as he’s the discreet ‘genius in the background’ type but he’s been working on designing and perfecting blanks for different rod companies for a long time. forever trying out different formulas, materials and how they all come together for the finished product is where this makes him shine. more than a craftsman, he’s also probably the most knowledgable person on the planet regarding fly casting, casting mechanics (even on a super-geek physics level) and one of the best casting instructors there is. put all that together and we’re left with some serious rods to play with. Akos wrote “are able to do things with graphite that only a handful of other individuals on the planet can” in the excerpt above but personally, i’d reduce that hand to two fingers and this is what really raised my interest.

even gladder yet, i was invited to be on Stickman pro staff. so far, my contribution has been an aesthetic one: designing the colour combination and general appearance of the Evil Black model and yes,  If Darth Vader had a fly rod this would be the one !!!”  to be honest, seeing them in photos doesn’t do them justice.

as i intend to write full reviews of these in the future, for the moment i’ll resume the overall casting qualities of these rods as the most pleasant and best i’ve ever used in these line classes. i wouldn’t agree to a relationship with the company if that weren’t the case.

rod components and build are all top-of-the-top notch. available for the moment in 5 and 8wt models in three different colour combinations for both sizes (and a 6wt in the making), personal colour and components variations can easily be arranged.
for more information on the various models, specs, CCS & MOI data, prices, warranty, fly line recommendations, etc, visit the Stickman site. If you are a guide, an instructor or an industry professional there is a Pro Program which gives you the opportunity to have them at a substantial discount.
contact Akos for more details at info@stickmanrods.com or send me an email through my contact form on TLC’s top bar. we’ll do our best to help you out.

Fly Fishing- The No Casters

By Aitor Coterón

follows is an article i’ve always found interesting. written a few years back,  Aitor’s opinions reflect the condition in Spain but we’ll find that it still applies just about anywhere.

” Charles Ritz defined time ago three basic types of fly anglers: conscious casters, non-conscious casters and non-interested casters. Had Mr. Ritz been still alive he could discover by himself that he had missed another kind: those that not only say that perfecting your fly casting is useless, but make every effort to discredit and insult those who believe and do just the opposite. The number of these individuals is really small -as small, by the way, as the number of anglers really interested in fly casting but they are determined to try to destroy what they don’t like. Their arguments are basically two:

Firstly, that good fly casting technique, including a good repertoire of presentation casts, is not only completely useless for getting good fishing results, more than that, the best casters are, without exception, very poor anglers -don’t worry Paul, I won’t tell anybody 🙂

More than 30 years ago, in Spain there were just a handful of anglers fishing with fly-rod and fly-line. At that time, fly fishing was synonymous of coq de Leon wet flies and a bubble float. And that was the kind of fishing that my grandpa and his fishing buddy taught to me. However I knew that there was another technique; I don’t remember when or where I had discovered it, probably on an old issue of “Field & Stream” that I inexplicably found (as my father wasn’t a fisherman) in my father’s library. That technique fascinated me, so I was talking to my grandpa about it day in day out. It was then that I discovered that he even had a fibreglass fly rod and a fly reel (some gift, I suppose), so I was delighted expecting that I was just about to discover a new world. But it turned out that the discovery should wait some more years yet: my grandfather did his best to dissuade me of trying to learn the “new” technique, and his discouragement and the lack of information ended up frustrating my expectations.

“Fly fishing is good for American rivers, it doesn’t work on our streams”, that was my grandfather’s version of the present motto “fly casting is unnecessary”. Traditionalism rejecting new ideas is no wonder though, of course, it doesn’t prevent that fly fishing was as universally effective as fly casting is one (not the only one) of the pillars of fishing with fly rod and line.

Secondly, the anti-casting crusade repeats (as an incontrovertible proof of his first point and assuming that those who win fishing championships are better anglers than everybody else) that competition fly fishers don’t give a damn about fly casting. It’s no wonder that when you are Czech nymphing, fly casting technique is no use -even fly fishing gear is a hindrance: there are more suitable kinds of tackle for fishing more effectively a nymph under the rod tip- but when using other fishing techniques fly casting is essential. Those competitors than don’t rely exclusively on Czech nymphing are aware of the fact that presentation and good casting are intimately related and, when fishing still waters from the bank, the ability to cast far can be a determining factor.

Last week a Spanish competitor, Jonathan Torralbo, won second place in the Fly Fishing World Championship held in Portugal (congratulations for him). Jonathan is a good distance caster and eager to improve, so recently he has been perfecting his technique with Alejandro, the master of Spanish distance casting.

So, competition fly fishers don’t give a damn about fly casting? It seems that -as the Spanish saying goes- some people are more papists than the Pope himself.
Of course, everybody is free of sustaining those arguments against the fly casting practice, but nobody is entitled to defend his points calumniating and twisting his opponent’s arguments. That attitude gets outside the field of fly fishing debate and gets into the area of psychology.

 

Fly Casting- Hand path dynamics with a double hand rod

a biomechanics study in this video from Alejandro Viñuales who has plotted and over-layed the hand movements of a long distance aerial overhead cast with a double hand rod.
another wonderful example demonstrating that what we might think we’re doing isn’t always what’s actually going on.