Salmon ears, Sound and vibration in water, Fish Communication and Noisy noises

and a whole bunch of other really cool/interesting/thought-provoking/andjustplaingoodreading fishy-science facts from MCX Fisher via buddy Pete Tyjas’ always great Eat Sleep Fish ezine.

even if the only image in the article appears to be a cod,

codsalmon

based on Atlantic salmon research, MCX goes a stretch further on explaining and going into great detail (and be sure to follow the adjoing links !*) on, eh, there’s no way i can add any more info on this subject so here’s a few excerpts:

“The underwater sound environment is entirely different to that in which we live in air. Accordingly, when thinking about the underwater world we have to dump our experience and preconceptions. Simply, salmon don’t ‘hear’ like us, because they don’t have ears”

“The key features of sound in water are that it:

– Is about 800 times more intense than in air, because the water is incompressible and therefore a much more efficient transmitter. In addition the surface layer reflects sound back into the water.

-Travels far further than in air: relatively minor events are detectable at ranges measured in kilometres, but the level of background noise is relatively very high because it is drawn from a much wider area.

-Goes about 4.4 times faster.

-Is influenced by the composition of the water.”

So much, so interesting, but what is its relevance to the angler?

If certain frequencies can stimulate a salmon to attack oceanic prey, can we exploit this in fresh water? In thinking about this it helps to grasp what 300 Hz sounds like in air : for comparison Middle C is 261 Hz. It is certainly much higher than the dull thrum of commonplace line vibration in fast water, which is in the range 10-30 Hz.”

and lastly,

“The moment you step into a pool the salmon’s formidable sensors will detect your activity, even if you have felt soles and a light step. However, they don’t know it’s you or what you’re doing, because in evolutionary terms humans haven’t been angling long enough to achieve any genetic impact on salmon. Unlike the calls of whales, seals and other fish, salmon anglers’ noises aren’t in the salmon signal library. Certainly they wouldn’t be able to connect the crunch of your studs on the gravel and the clink of your wading staff on the rocks with the drama of being caught, except perhaps if they’d been caught shortly before by another heavy-footed fisherman.”

but there’s a gazillion more fascinating things to read on this noisy subject and to do so simply click the cod ! enjoy !


* and one of those happens to be a really geeky but eversocool Beeps, Chirps and Noise channel on youtube where i found this little brown noise treat ! (yeah, that’s sounds a little idon’tknowwhat but don’t be afraid, you won’t have to go clean up after listening to it… )

“Brown noise is noise with a power spectral density inversely proportional to the frequency squared. It decreases in power by 6 dB per octave or 20 dB per decade. The sound of brown noise mimics a waterfall or heavy rainfall.”

When asked why she tied flies she replied, “Because they’re pretty”

“In a cottage in northern Scotland, Megan Boyd twirled bits of feather, fur, silver and gold into elaborate fishing flies – at once miniature works of art and absolutely lethal. Wherever men and women cast their lines for the mighty Atlantic salmon, her name is whispered in mythic reverence and stories about her surface and swirl like fairy tales.

With breathtaking cinematography and expressive, hand-painted animation, this film both adheres to and escapes from traditional documentary form, spinning the facts and fictions of one woman’s life into a stunning meditation on solitude, love, and its illusions.”

Kiss the Water, embrace the beauty. this one’s more than special.
reserve yourself an hour and be sure to watch it in full screen HD. enjoy !

EDIT– sorry folks, the video has been removed.
hopefully its replacement will be available soon. stay tuned !

If you’re going to release them, release them well.

here’s how to do it properly with a very minimal –if any– effect to its health and lifespan. 

fly fishing videos: Proper Catch and Release Methods

 ‘Live Release of Wild Atlantic Salmon’, a very nice effort put together by fqsawith top fishers Geneviève Fournier and Dave Adams.

the voice-over guy kinda sounds like a robot but the message is clear, concise and good. of special note is keeping the fish out of the water no longer than five seconds at a time, something too many anglers are prone to overlook in the ‘heat of the moment’ even if they mean well. if there’s a need or desire for more pics just put it back, let it breath and calm down and start over again, five seconds at a time.
geared towards the Atlantic salmon, the same methods apply to all species. enjoy !

and speaking of Québec and what might make your salmon-fishing trip there even more specialer, i’m not sure of the exact dates but a major My Little Pony convention is planned soon. an astounding fact is that pony Bronies (fans) are predominantly adult and male…

brainwashem’ young- My First Salmon, an interactive iPad/iTunes experience for kids

My_First_Salmon_Ibook_Final.225x225-75

created as a continuation of the paper editions of My First Trout and My First Salmon previously mentioned here in the ‘brainwashem’ young series, Eoin Fairgrieve takes one big step further with this new publication by providing it in digital form to share with our wee ones.

“Written by professional fly casting instructor, Eoin Fairgrieve, My First Salmon is an interactive children’s book about learning to fish for Atlantic salmon.  This book has been inspired by Eoin’s work teaching thousands of children to fish, and comprises of sixteen chapters covering all aspects of fly fishing for this prized species of fish. It includes motion graphics, interactive educational tools, and an image gallery. The book is written in an informative and engaging style, and children will learn about water safety, the salmon’s anatomy and lifecycle, and the importance of maintaining a healthy riverside environment.  Other chapters include information on the Atlantic salmon’s amazing ocean migration as well as essential tackle and fly casting techniques.  This publication is an ideal reading and reference guide for any child interested in learning to fish for salmon, and is particularly suitable for children between the ages of 9-16 years.”

a sample page from the book on salmon anatomy
'my first salmon' anatomy page EF

outside of bringing them to the water (and as a perfect addition to this), at $6.99 it’s one of the better gifts you give your kids or a friend’s or relative’s.
click either pic to access the iTunes store.

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