‘Headwaters

by Elizabeth and Charles Schwarz 1966
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” The upper reaches of streams are a wonderful part of this world. But they are delicate and vulnerable environments, often assaulted unknowingly by human use of the land. The film introduces the “citizens” of this unique world, featuring the smallmouth bass, and shows how these creatures live and die in a small community. “

filmed almost fifty years ago here’s a lovely refreshing treat, specially if your summer heat is as nasty as it is here. primarily focussed on the smallmouth bass, this lovely time-piece is a reminder that each element in a system is just as important as another.

of course, one can wonder why they’d go all through all the effort of showing us what a special and vulnerable environment it is and end it all by showing fishers stringing up these fish for the sake of ‘sport’, but i guess that just like pollution, watershed management, forestry work and all the other elements that are detrimental to waterways, this  film reminds us that a lot of things don’t change.
ok, i had to include that last part because i can’t help it… but ! to not end on a negative note, the viewer can rejoice because even though death in various forms is normal and present throughout the film, there’s a whole lot of fish sex as well. the film is 30 minutes long so, if you can’t watch it now be sure to save it for later. enjoy !

click on the Schwartz’s pick for more info on this most productive nature filming couple.

deep thoughts

Apex Predators, Lack of Teeth and Renormalized Rationality

 and deep throat. yikes  !
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“Humans like to believe that we are top tier predators. For most, it is true even without the use of weapons. For others, fearsome spiders and snakes reduce the ability to be any kind of predator at all.  It is just a part of the human condition. Take away all we have and it wont be long before animals find out that we are delicious and slow bags of meat… “

that’s just the intro to one of the more interesting reads on thoughts about fishing, fish, humans, predators, huckleberries, how it all relates, and who knows what else i’ve had the pleasure to read. it’s not like i necessarily agree with it all but it’s the thought process, manner and style i find particularly interesting. this isn’t your average “Went out and nailed the suckers !” blog post. lots of highly recommended food for thought.
click the pic for the full article, enjoy !

fly design- Seeing Red

by Alan Bithell via Rodtrip

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“The lochs in my part of the (Scottish) Highlands are acidic; this is from the peat that blankets this part of the world.
Aquatic insects find it difficult to extract oxygen from the water if it is acidic. To counter this their haemoglobin has to be more efficient. As it becomes more efficient it also becomes redder.”
“This explained the choices which of flies we use. Tradition has us using lots of flies with red in them. My approach to the traditional flies has been to ask “What is it that makes this pattern successful?” then to look into how modern materials enable me to tie flies with more of what makes them work.”

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brilliant info indeed. after a loooong time and a lot of experimenting, i had finally been able to somewhat ‘break the color code’ on the similar dark-dark waters in Sweden but had no clue why red somewhere on the fly seemed to do the trick better than other tones. thanks Alan !

as a side note when talking about fly colors, it’s a well-accepted fact that red is the first color to ‘disappear’ in the water column (loose it’s distinctive hue and turn to a shade of grey) the deeper it goes down and conversely, blue will retain it’s hue deepest. true, most Loch-Style flies are designed to be fished pretty close to the surface but i can’t help but wonder how this red vs blue phenomenon is affected by peat-stained water ?

click either pic for the complete article. enjoy !