how Salmon find their way home.

via National Geographic, photo courtesy of Todd Mintz.

“To find their way back home across thousands of kilometers of ocean, salmon imprint on [i.e. learn and remember] the magnetic field that exists where they first enter the sea as juveniles”

sockey spawning

“So Putman and colleagues hypothesized that salmon were using variations in the Earth’s magnetic field to figure out where “home” was. If this was true, then the researchers could see if a salmon’s ability to navigate changed over time with small, naturally occurring variations in the global magnetic field.
Putman and colleagues used 56 years of fisheries data to study a group of sockeye salmon that spawned in the Fraser River in British Columbia and spent much of their adult lives in and around Alaska‘s Aleutian Islands. The researchers studied the likely routes the salmon took in transit between these two locations and compared it to data on the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field at the time.”


fascinating stuff and something i’ve always wondered about. for more of this groovy-magnetely delicious-fishy study click the pic above and to find out how these fish sound and know all about their food preferences click below. enjoy !

Casting a Voice

from Barbless Fly Media filmed by Dimitri Gammer

i could sit here for hours and attempt to explain why you, me, we, anybody should get involved in this or any other conservation project around the world but that doesn’t work, the call has to come from within and not from some guy on the other side of the planet. here’s hoping this video might wake up that call.

“Casting a Voice” is a fly fishing conservation film, using the perspective of anglers to examine the risks facing one of British Columbia’s most precious resources – wild fish. The proposed Northern Gateway pipeline project would run through some of the most abundant wild salmon and steelhead waters left on the planet. The Skeena River and its tributaries remain a rare stronghold for healthy populations of anadromous fish, while wild fish stocks have declined elsewhere.

for the love of water- Sacred Headwaters

via Patagoniavideo

“In northern British Columbia, three of the province’s greatest salmon-bearing rivers are formed in the subalpine basin known as the Sacred Headwaters. The land has one of the largest intact predator-prey systems in North America and is the traditional territory of the In northern British Columbia, three of the province’s greatest salmon-bearing rivers are formed in the subalpine basin known as the Sacred Headwaters. The land has one of the largest intact predator-prey systems in North America and is the traditional territory of the Tahltan First Nation.
The Headwaters is at the centre of a dispute between the Tahltan, resource industries, government and environmental groups. Competing interests concerning land use, mining and hunting have created divides and put the future health of the Sacred Headwaters at risk.”

since it seems we’ll be around for a little longer, maybe it’s a sign telling us we might want to help  preserve what we have left and it’s not just about fishing.
here’s a nice place to start.