the beauty of not fishing

or rather, those moments when we’re not actually fishing; concentrating hard on a good presentation, drift, bug detection/fly selection, animation, current seam, rise or sometimes simply the annoying fly that’s caught in a branch because we got too excited by something fishy and forgot to take our bearings before reacting to that fishy thing.

in other words, the break where we put the fishy stuff temporarely aside and get to fully take in our surroundings.

these breaks are a welcome and in my opinion, necessary interlude to the play of the day. eyes, mind and body relax and that relaxed state helps to remind us that there’s so much more to what we do than just try to catch fish.

winterfield m.fauvet-TLC 20-2-16_edit

this image of an impending storm behind the stream isn’t anything special, in fact it was taken with my iPhone (which is quite an amazingly good camera for a phone) but landscape photography greatly benefits from higher lens resolution and tone separation: the little phone tries hard but can’t do the scene justice.

it’s a far cry from one of the grandiose images of wild places taken from renowned and respected photographers with fancy-ass equipment but it still managed to capture the mildly-dramatic moment and i still like it because it’s yet another example of how important it is to focus-shift regularly and take a break.

another view of France

no anger, no nationalism, no blood, no politics, no religion, no patriotism, no violence, no fear.
just fields.

stereotypes show us the Eiffel tower, baguettes, people with bad teeth, cheese and quite attractive women in mini-skirts and while all those can be rightly considered symbols of this nation, there’s of course a lot more to it than that. France, just like many other countries is primarily agricultural, take a flight over the country and almost all you’ll see are fields. real nature can be found here and there but man’s intervention dominates the landscape but that doesn’t necessarily mean that its unattractive. more than mere symbols of the need for food and commerce, they’re a strong reminder of the ones who created them.

this place is just around the corner but it could be anywhere. all these fields seem to convey the same feeling; one of peace and quiet, of serenity and timelessness and contemplation. these fields occasionally get washed out by storms, hail and even fire but they always grow back and so will those who made and loved and tended them for its their home and homes occasionally need to be rebuilt.

France m.fauvet-TLC 14-11-15

gotta start somewhere

way in the back there, yup, on top of the peaks. the white stuff; it’s snow, the first snow of the season and what might be the last snow to melt later on next spring.
for now its just an insignificant sprinkling but if there’s a lot more and our little friends are lucky this’ll all end up in their home and they’ll have a lot more space to do all the fishy things they do when they’re not confined to barren rivers.
gotta start somewhere…

first snow m.fauvet-TLC 6-11-15
 Pyrenees Mountains, Andorra

Bubble, bubble toil and trouble.

William Shakespeare
Macbeth

A dark Cave. In the middle, a Caldron boiling. Thunder.

Enter the three Witches.

1 WITCH. Thrice the brinded cat hath mew’d.
2 WITCH. Thrice and once, the hedge-pig whin’d.
3 WITCH. Harpier cries:—’tis time! ’tis time!
1 WITCH. Round about the caldron go;
In the poison’d entrails throw.—
Toad, that under cold stone,
Days and nights has thirty-one;
Swelter’d venom sleeping got,
Boil thou first i’ the charmed pot!

FTLOW M.Fauvet-TLC 23-7-14 - 2006-11-06 at 16-00-37

ALL. Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
2 WITCH. Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,—
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
ALL. Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
3 WITCH. Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf;
Witches’ mummy; maw and gulf
Of the ravin’d salt-sea shark;
Root of hemlock digg’d i the dark;
Liver of blaspheming Jew;
Gall of goat, and slips of yew
Sliver’d in the moon’s eclipse;
Nose of Turk, and Tartar’s lips;
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch-deliver’d by a drab,—
Make the gruel thick and slab:
Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron,
For the ingrediants of our caldron.
ALL. Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
2 WITCH. Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.