a grayling, a cat, a love bug and The Animal

Markus Hoffman says it’s a caddis imitation. not being so sure as to what he’s referring to i did a little research for myself-

animal |ˈanəməl|
noun
a living organism that feeds on organic matter, typically having specialized sense organs and nervous system and able to respond rapidly to stimuli: animals such as unspecific flies adapt badly to a caged, boxed life |humans are the only animals who weep when they can’t decide on the right fly to use whereas flies think it’s funny when humans weep.
• any such living organism other than a human being: No other creature feels compelled to tie flies or fly fish.
• a mammal, as opposed to a bird, reptile, fish, or insect: the snowfall seemed to have chased all birds, animals, and fly tiers indoors to lay their eggs.
• a person whose behavior is regarded as devoid of human attributes or civilizing influences:  “those men have to be animals, they’re constantly pointing their thumbs towards the heavens”.
• [ with adj. or noun modifier ] a particular type of person or thing: a regular party animal | wha ?…

hmmm, i’m still very much clueless and will have to find a better dictionary… but it’s a lovely video that gets this cat’s thumbs-up approval. cat-thumbs-upyou might want to share this with your kids, enjoy !

Grey Flagging

hot off the vice and extra-yumm, this lovely caddis imitation is well, simply lovely.
if a fish doesn’t want this, it doesn’ deserve to be caught…  *

* – i’m not sure what that last part means but i’m sure you got the point. enjoy !

Streaking through Flames

or “The Streaking Caddis” by Andreas Lestander

making muddler-style heads on flies involves a few more things than just deer hair and one of them (ok, two of them) is patience and tolerance, something your house-mates/concubine/wife/husband/pets/ will also need because the messy trimmed hairs get everywhere (oh yes, everywhere… ). you’ll also need some kind of tool to trim the head to shape, usually scissors or a razor-blade.

there’s nothing wrong with those two tools but the first one generally gives an unsightly lumpy-bumpy result and the second can easily turn into a ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’-like scene (if you can find those old-school blades in the first place) and with either, there’s still the damn hairs (and quite possibly a lot of blood) everywhere. everywhere.

ahhh, but there’s a third option and this one includes the always-fun-to-play-with element:  fire
in today’s brilliant tying tutorial, Andreas not only shows us how to make a nice, smooth, easy and sexy head (hmmmm… ) but also how to turn one mess into a completely different one !
see, what happens is the singed hairs disappear (yay, nothing to clean up !) but ! this disappearance is only relative because the hairs have reincarnated themselves into the most absolutely horrido-horrible zombie-like smoke smell you can ever imagine. it’s a well known fact that fly tiers have no sense of smell (or any other non-fly tying sense for that matter when they’re in the groove) which is probably a good thing to get good results but in today’s case, this lack is pretty detrimental to the rest of society and the best place to do this might be at an isolated cabin on top of a mountain. in the northernmost part of Sweden.
anyway, making this fly will not only bring the supreme joy of catching a lot of trout but also one of fulfilling a very important need  in our over-crowded society:  some time alone. should you not be able to get others to leave you alone then use this technique to make them leave !

tips:
– as written on the video, be sure to varnish the whip-finish before burning away to be sure your thread doesn’t melt !
– go creative with the body/abdomen. stripped peacock quill, cat gut and a myriad other goodies make excellent substitutes.
– personally i find this kind of barbecue lighter a lot easier to work with than the standard pocket lighter.

bic lighter

after-note: there are theories by the aforementioned sense-numbed tiers that trimming deer hair with fire actually cauterizes the hair tips, sealing the air cells within the hairs, further enhancing the floatability of the fly. i can not prove or disprove this, it does sound pretty good but a gut feeling tells me it’s bunk. i’d give these a good dose of Aquel anyway, just to be sure… 😉

related articles

too cool caddis larva

woW… some really nice out-of-the-box thinking here yielding a fantabulous result.
it’s not every day we get to have so much fun with basically a bare hook, glue and flames,

hmg caddis larva 1

make a horrid mess,
hmg caddis larva 2

and turn an ugly duckling into a beautiful caddis larva.hmg caddis larva 3click on either pic to access Ivan Randjelović Mixmaster’s  brilliant tutorial on musicarenje.net
enjoy !

note- i’ve never seen or heard of black hot melt glue and a quick net search doesn’t reveal much. maybe permanent markers will do the trick for the thorax region and legs.

related articles

Grannomses II

i was going to simply share Davie McPhail’s new tying tutorial of his Emerging Grannom Caddis but thought a little more background wouldn’t hurt. basically a reprint of the post with the same name and since i’m very busy preparing a special ‘Welcome the Snake’ party… here’s nevertheless a recap on this early season bug and it’s representative flies that should to be in every trout angler’s box.

Grannoms- Brachycentrus Caddis fly
often neglected in favor of the various ‘mythic‘ mayfly species, the Grannom is an early season and widely distributed caddis who’s imitation in different sizes and colors is well worth having in your fly box. Grannom hatches can be massive and will usually have the fish in a debilitating frenzy, excluding every other bug that might be around. i’ve been in the middle of one of these hatches on a Scottish river and was literally covered from head to water level and had to quickly pull up my buff to be able to breathe without eating at the same time…

“This prolific genus includes the popular eastern US early-season Apple Caddis and Grannom hatches. Their life cycles are ideal for the fly angler, and every stage is frequent trout prey. This species changes color dramatically after it emerges, and imitations of egg-laying adults should be a different color from imitations of emergers. Emergers have pale blonde, almost off-white wings and bright green bodies, while the egg-laying adults have light brownish gray wings and medium green bodies.”

these two aren’t grannomses, they’re Mark and Terry.
Mark is a super friend, Terry is some guy Mark and i found in the parking lot while we where gearing up for some fishing on a lovely little river in northern England. don’t get the wrong impression, Terry doesn’t just hang out in parking lots, he’s a passionate entomologist and charming man full of stories and a great enthusiasm for sharing his buggy knowledge.

when we all got to the water, Terry did a quick scan of the river-bed rocks, turned towards us and proudly announced:  “That one”.
he quickly waded in, picked up the “That one” rock and showed us a gelatinous mass stuck to it’s bottom. at first i thought it was just some yucky slime hidden under the rock by some alien with a nasty head cold but after further explanation it turned out to be a ‘nest’ of Grannom eggs. weird and geeky entomologists would probably have some way of counting them on a square cm average or something but my little mind quickly realized that i was looking at thousands and thousands of future caddis all under just this one rock. and there where countless rocks everywhere one looked…

every little dot on this out of focus image is an egg. (sorry for the out of focus image, this was an exciting moment)

an adult Grannom courtesy of Jim Williams.
judging by the size of the finger holding it we’ll notice that it’s very small, my guess between a size 16 and 18.
in the two videos below the flies are tied in 16 and 14 and a little research will tell you of the size to expect and tie for your area.

here are three grannom fly variations with a brand new one from Davie McPhail, the Emerging grannom with a nice twist, the laid -forward hackle post that looks nothing like the real bug but in my eyes is a million times better than the usual upright/phallic/‘wave you hands in the air’ wing post. enjoy !

– Emerging Grannom by Davie McPhail

– Egg-Laying Grannom tied by Matt Grovert

– CDC Bubble Grannom by Davie McPhail

the ‘Henryville Special’

previously showcased David Stenström outdoes himself once again both in tying virtuoso and in photography skills with this little caddisy beauty originally created by Hiram Brobst of the Pocono Mountains region of Eastern Pennsylvania.

the Henryvile Special - David Stenström

i don’t like the concept of perfection but if i did, this would be very close. woW…

a Juicy-Latexy Caddis Pupae

via Mikel Elexpuru at flymage

here’s a trout candy treat in the form of a caddis pupae. it’s an intricate tie and i’m having a hard time understanding why the messy fibers at the the head weren’t trimmed off or better yet, folded back before finishing the fly… but other than that it sure is a pretty and ‘realistic’ bug with tons of triggers.
not only do we get to brush up on our Spanish, it’s also a treat to see a great tutorial coming from a somewhat lesser known tier . enjoy !

the Elasticaddis !

from Barry Ord Clarke

ok, these are extremely well, ermmm,  funny looking flies… 😆 but !!!  hat’s off the mysterious inventor of this pattern and to Barry for showing us how to put it together. rubber bands and hooks. what better way to have fun ?


as noted in the SBS, using the bead as a ‘stacker’ is quite ingenious and this trick can be adapted to other patters.


go creative , the fish’ll never know what hit them !

click either pic for Barry’s step by step. enjoy !

“flakes of dust”, a dead caddis imitation.

the Dead Caddis by Davie McPhail

now, as far as i know (little), imitating dead caddis is a rather uncommon practice and that’s what makes this pattern quite interesting.
i’ve seen trout rising to the dead naturals and have fished them successfully with a standard sedge imitation but i’ll admit i didn’t seriously examine the dead naturals to see if the’d changes appearences from the live ones.
of course there will be a total lack of movement and i’m reasonably sure that there isn’t a body/wing posture change so i’m thinking it might be a slight change of color that really sets these apart.
for whatever the reasons, this big bushy, well floating thing is worth having in the box for an occasion where the fish might key in on the dead ones drifting by. enjoy !

the Elk Hair Caddis

personally, i wouldn’t touch one with a stick !
it wreaks of bad mojo, is a messy little number and the only thing it inspires to is trouble…

created a million years ago by Al Troth, some old chap that was born old.
it’s a simple fly for simple fish.

some consider it the ‘go-to’ for a caddis hatch. i think they look nice in trees.

Grannomses !

Grannoms- Brachycentrus Caddis fly
often neglected in favor of the various ‘mythic‘ mayfly species, the Grannom is an early season and widely distributed caddis who’s imitation in different sizes and colors is well worth having in your fly box. Grannom hatches can be massive and will usually have the fish in a debilitating frenzy, excluding every other bug that might be around. i’ve been in the middle of one of these hatches on a Scottish river and was literally covered from head to water level and had to quickly pull up my buff to be able to breathe without eating at the same time…

“This prolific genus includes the popular eastern US early-season Apple Caddis and Grannom hatches. Their life cycles are ideal for the fly angler, and every stage is frequent trout prey. This species changes color dramatically after it emerges, and imitations of egg-laying adults should be a different color from imitations of emergers. Emergers have pale blonde, almost off-white wings and bright green bodies, while the egg-laying adults have light brownish gray wings and medium green bodies.”

these two aren’t grannomses, they’re Mark and Terry.
Mark is a super friend, Terry is some guy Mark and i found in the parking lot while we where gearing up for some fishing on a lovely little river in northern England. don’t get the wrong impression, Terry doesn’t just hang out in parking lots, he’s a passionate entomologist and charming man full of stories and a great enthusiasm for sharing his buggy knowledge.

when we all got to the water, Terry did a quick scan of the river-bed rocks, turned towards us and proudly announced:  “That one”.
he quickly waded in, picked up the “That one” rock and showed us a gelatinous mass stuck to it’s bottom. at first i thought it was just some yucky slime hidden under the rock by some alien with a nasty head cold but after further explanation it turned out to be a ‘nest’ of Grannom eggs. weird and geeky entomologists would probably have some way of counting them on a square cm average or something but my little mind quickly realized that i was looking at thousands and thousands of future caddis all under just this one rock. and there where countless rocks everywhere one looked…

every little dot on this out of focus image is an egg. (sorry for the out of focus image, this was an exciting moment)

here’s an adult Grannom courtesy of Jim Williams.
judging by the size of the finger holding it we’ll notice that it’s very small, my guess between a size 16 and 18.
in the two videos below the flies are tied in 16 and 14 and a little research will tell you of the size to expect and tie for your area.

 

 

here are two fly variations of the same egg-laying female. as noted in Matt ‘s video, for the male version, tie the same fly but without the eggs !
by their construction and materials they both seem to be great floaters but my experience tells me Matt’s will probably be the better choice in slower waters and Davie’s in faster.

– Egg-Laying Grannom tied by Matt Grovert

– CDC Bubble Grannom by Davie McPhail