Caeneus

“A young nymph loved by Poseidon. One day the god said he would give Caenis anything she wanted in token of his affection. She asked to be changed into a man, and an invulnerable fighter at that. Although this was the last thing Poseidon had expected or wished to hear, he obliged, and Caenis became Caeneus.

Under her – or rather his – new name, Caeneus became a great warrior and got so carried away with his prowess that he walked into the middle of town one day and propped up his spear in the marketplace.

“From now on, everybody,” said Caeneus, “you will worship my spear as a god.”

who would have thunk such a lovely creature would get its name from a soap-opera…

oh, boy ! there’s no way that’s going to turn out well for the pompous, spear-weilding, newly-named Caeneus trans.

click here for the rest on Mythweb.com, enjoy !

November Caenis (or, doing three things at the same time)

multitasking is a stupid concept. i want to do several things at the same time knowing very well that neither one will be done properly as if it had been done separately but the unfocussed mind persists, considers it a challenge or whatever it is that confused minds like to find as an excuse so, i dumbly persist until i’m just about to completely delete the two product reviews i’m working on at the moment (super-good most-excellent stuff !) when this little guy stops by, raises it’s palm traffic-cop style and starts singing “STOP ! In the name of Love !…”  ummmm, doesn’t raise or say anything at all but sits there right purdy just long enough for me to grab the camera and take a quick pick before it takes off to resume its, ahhh… don’t know what to call it, pre-death fluttering-about ritual ?

’nuff said for today, i have a few things to do in a half-assed way, here’s the intruder. click the pic for more bugs and here for some completely inconsequential caenis info. enjoy !

window may m.fauvet-TLC 3-11-15

Caenis Ins and Outs

see-nis frombelow m.fauvet:TLC 7-6-15we already know this gorgeous little creature has several functions:

– firstly and most importantly, it gets us all excited when we see one. it makes us stop whatever it was we where doing (even if that something was fun), run over and grab a rod and do what’s natural for us fly fishers: have more fun than what normal people consider as fun.
– it also means that the environment where these wee things came from is in pretty good shape. as an example, the bug above was born right next to my house on the Canal du Midi, a green, warm and rather slimy-looking waterway that’s been enjoying a rather drastic decrease in pollutants of all kinds in recent years.
as well as the all-time standard chironomids one would expect to see in waters like this, there’s also been a great increase of caddis and damsels with all of them keeping the house martins, swifts and of course fish busy and happy and not to get all mushy, but that all makes me happy too.

but there’s a lot more to these bugs, here’s some maybe not-so-commonly known facts about our little friends. let’s start with the out’s, the kind of info that takes up unnecessary brain disk-space while remaining amusing.

caenis scrabble
(
no self-respecting fly fisher would be caught dead playing a word game that doesn’t accept real and important words so, this shouldn’t be a problem)

out of the 160 or so different types of caenidae, some of them have interesting monikers such as:
Caenis amica well known for being the friendliest of the species.
Caenis bella for having won a beauty contest when he was oversees.
Caenis catherinae because it’s the sweetest of the family thus named after my Mémé Catherine.
Caenis cornuta because she either has a horn or her boyfriend is cheating on her.
Caenis hilaris this one’s good at telling jokes.
Caenis latipennis your guess is as good as mine…
Caenis moe from the Three Stooges.
Caenis oculta named after Abby the Goth Girl.
and Caenis robusta for its insatiable desire for strong, bittery coffee.

to conclude the pointless part of this post here are caenis anagrams.
caenis anagrams
(those are really boring words. best to stick to the original as much as possible… )

and now for the in, a little something all fishers can really benefit from: how to pronounce what’s probably the most ill-pronounced bug on the planet !
caenis pronounced
and if that doesn’t make sense, it’s SeeNiss and not KayNiss !

a big thanks to buddy, all-round cool guy, fellow Barrio Fly Lines Pro-Team member and language stickler/Lineslinger Will Shaw for reminding me of my own pronunciation deficiencies. yes, i used to be a Kaynisser
for more pointless caenissy info click either text block. enjoy !

Caenis insights

or enlarged views of the ‘angler’s curse‘.
just that common name alone should get our attention even if it sounds a bit masochistic fishing-wise, even for those of us who love a challenge !

“When the important hatches of Tricorythodes were first discovered by anglers, Caenis was given the credit. We now know that the Caenis mayflies are a different group, smaller and less common in trout streams, and they hatch in the evening instead of the morning.

They very rarely elicit selective feeding, but when they do they’re very tough to match because they’re often much smaller than size 28. This difficulty has earned them the nickname “Angler’s Curse.”

simple enough to say, even if these early observers didn’t have a watch or map… what comes out in the end in practical terms for us fly anglers is these thingies are very-very small and their proportions are completely off from the larger mayfly species as they have stout bodies, specially the thorax and long tails and antennae and the wings tend to sit out on the sides ‘spent-like’ instead of the usual top: basically the trigger points we’ll want to recreate when tying these flies.

here’s some reference vintage plates of our beautiful little friends to use while we’re at the tying bench. enjoy !

caenis_luctuosa_by_guiguiblitz-d5zfqamcaenis 2caenis 3and just because its so cool to see details millions of times bigger than life size,
caenis parts

angler’s curse quote via TroutNut.com
vintage plates via Google Images