fly tying step-by-steps: the Failed/Emerging Buzzer

failed buzzer1

by Alan Bithell

“This isn’t a pattern of my own invention. Many years ago Alan Roe arrived home from work late. On looking in the refrigerator for something to eat he saw a box containing 4 packs of Birds Eye Cod in Parsley Sauce. Grabbing it he put two in the microwave for dinner. Between the packs he found a sheet of thin foam packing material. After his dinner he sat for a couple of hours thinking that there must be a fly tying application for this foam sheet. This pattern is what he came up with.”

thank goodness for supermarket food !
in what has to be a sure-fire, hard-core fish-slurping fly, what makes this one stand out is the wing material. standard, thin sheeted transparent foam sure looks the deal at the vice but a) doesn’t float for long and b) gets torn to shreds after just a few fish, usually one. Tyvek on the other hand, has a strengthening backing, keeps its transparency and alleviates all the problems mentioned above. the creative tier will find all sorts of uses for this: wing cases, streamer bodies, shucks and indicators just to name a few.

nice way to tie it on !

failed buzzer2to start your own wrapping click either image for the complete step-by-step, materials list and source. enjoy !

one fish, two fish, three fish, eight !

a Reversed-Parachute Midge Emerger
the other day we had an article, step-by-step and tutorial video on Roy Christie’s fantabulous Reverse-Parachute emerger and while viewing it again the idea of incorporating Roy’s hackle and thorax design to an emerging midge abdomen lit up and this is what came out of it.

this is a size 16 copy of the original, the first one having been selfishly brought home by some overly-excited slimy brute, Mister Nine.

the title of this post kinda says it all but it was rather a special moment so here goes again. it’s pretty rare that a fly gets so much attention on it’s first try , specially without additional tweaking.
so, first cast with the new pattern = first fish. second cast = second fish, third cast, ditto. in the excitement i lost count but one of the trout jumped out of the water to take the fly on the way back down, making an enormous big splash, instant and automatic hook-up while having me WooP-WooooP for all to hear.
now, i  rarely WooP-WooooP but this kind of fishy action is as good as it gets !  i’m pretty sure the only ones who heard it where a local gang of crows but i’m also sure that just like me they’ll never forget. Mister Nine kept it for his own collection and the special half hour moment ended.

another one size 18 with it’s little dropper nymph size 20 to hang just below the emerger-

made with:
love
hook- Maruto C47 BL #14 – 20
thread/abdomen- Veevus 8/0 black. tied in ‘ messylumpy’ because ‘messylumpy’ is well, sexy…
rib & hackle loop- Maxima nylon tippet 4 lbs brown
dubbing/thorax- Mad Rabbit natural & black with a few drops of peacock Hends Specta
hackle- genetic saddle ginger

for the hackling method click the link at the top of the page and don’t be intimidated if you’re trying this out for the first time. it’s a lot easier than it may first appear, enjoy !

Tying The Chironomid Emerger

by Gareth Lewis in Southern Wales
“Like most of the patterns I tie, I can’t claim any creative-rights, however, I have tweaked this pattern a lot over the years, and it’s a simply fantastic pattern for both trout and grayling; during the warmest and coldest months. A simple pattern with only a handful of materials, it’s a great imitation of the emerging chironomid (non-biting midge) as it sits in the surface film, attempting to break free. All the triggers are there – with an emerging ‘mess’ of legs, a little flash to imitate the chemical-like bursts of bio-matter, and a nice, simple, CDC wing. I never EVER go on a fishing trip without this pattern.”

sounds pretty darn good and the fly looks even gooder ! click the pic for the step-by-step video on Gareth’s web page Fly Fishing in South Wales.