Wednesday’s Worm

if you like yours bent, this one’s for you !

with it’s quirky name and rubbery twisty-turny shape here’s yet another yummy tidbit sure to attract a variety of species from Curtis Fry at Fly Fish Food, the Re-Vladi Worm. (don’t ask) (but do try these, no fish in it’s right mind could refuse them) (ok, if like me you live/fish an area where the fishes aren’t particularly turned on by fluorescent colors, wrap them up with more natural colored rubber or skin) (unless of course if you fish for slimy, horrid, stinking grayling. in that case stick to orange) (i’ll be using an old patch of chamois skin i’ve been saving for just the right fly and this is it !) (enjoy !) (and get bent !)

one for the Stoners (creating foam extended bodies)

by Curtis Fry at Fly Fish Food

pteronarcys

“These big bugs, AKA Pteronarcys Californica, are the largest of the stonefly order (plecoptera — which literally means “braided wings”) and incite large migrations of fly fishers from around the world as hopeful hatch-matchers descend on the Western rivers that host these giant bugs and their legendary emergences.”

ok, not all of us are able to swarm out west (or east) to go see these massive critters…stone-fly-tattoo

however, just about all of us are lucky enough to have smaller cousins of the stonefly family in our local waters so this video is just the ticket for making our own sure-floating, easy to cast/fish, lively (and pretty-darn cute) imitation to suit our waters.
in what is rather a complex or rather, labor-intensive tying tutorial, here’s a mountain of great advice, tips and tricks on creating extended foam bodies. surely the best i’ve ever seen and one that’s sure to inspire. of course this specific pattern is very interesting but what i’m mostly seeing here are several techniques that can be transposed to many other imitations including floating nymphs and streamers just to name a few.
as i’m sure most of us couldn’t validate the expense of buying full sets of wing and body cutters don’t be put off if you don’t have them. the bodies and wing can simply be cut with scissors or an exacto-type blade, the resultant rough edges are easily made smooth and sexy with a lighter as Curtis shows us when ‘prettying up’ the tail section (but be sure to practice this on a waste piece first !), and you can use a big sewing needle for the extended body pin.
a super-nice trick is how the rubber legs are sandwiched and glued in place instead of the usual tying in. i just had one of those “D’Oh ! why didn’t i think of that?! “ moments…

“This fly has guts”

the Gutbomb Bloodworm, a chironomid larva pattern by Curtis Fry at Fly Fish Food

a lot of high quality tying step-by-steps and videos have been coming out in the recent weeks and to start off a selection of the best, today’s little gem certainly has the required qualities we’d expect from a midge larvae: the curvy shape, size, slim profile and what maybe most tiers neglect and to me what really makes or breaks the effectiveness of these imitations: translucency, meaning that not only we and the fish can see what’s inside the bug but that light is seen coming through the bug by the fish looking up at it through the water column on their squigly-wiggly way to the surface.

“In my way of thinking, the chironomid larva is the hotdog of the stillwater trout world. Plump, juicy, full of tasty goodness and they’re all over the place.”

gutbomb bloodworm flyfishfood

personally, i can’t get excited about hotdogs but i like his point. it’s a well known fact that fish love them and that’s more than enough reason to have a nice selection of these ‘dogs in the box !

as a bonus, during the video we’ll notice an interesting comment about fish having “x-ray and UV eyes and they “shoot UV rays out”. now, i’m not about to go into commenting on that… 😆 except for it added a special touch to what is already a great tying tutorial and fly.
i hope you’ll enjoy this as much as i did.

be sure to check other great videos and articles at Fly Fish Food while you’re there. good stuff indeed.