proportion perfect

a delightful blast from the not-so-far past from Jeff Kennedy and the much missed Drawing Flies 52 project.
i’m not the nostalgic type but Jeff’s and Jason Borger‘s fly and fish art collaboration where very special. their art is still out there, easily viewable for anyone willing to do a little research. i guess its the “what’ll they come with next week ?” i miss most.

proportionally perfect - Jeff Kennedy

a Wind Knot in the making

by Takashi Kuwahara

always fun, inspiring yet somewhat whimsical at least at first viewing, Takashi’s drawings are also often food for thought.

outside of being a delightful drawing, today’s image shows us a caster that has multiple problems, the least being that he’ll most likely end up with knot(s) in his leader and a messy presentation because there’s slack from the line hand all the way to the fly but more importantly because this is a serious safety issue, his casting plane is still on his right shoulder even though there’s a hard wind blowing onto it. this is one of the best ways to wear a hook.
hopefully it’s a barbless hook and this guy will work on the Five Essentials of Fly Casting in the near future…

wind-knot in the making - Kuwahara

Caenis insights

or enlarged views of the ‘angler’s curse‘.
just that common name alone should get our attention even if it sounds a bit masochistic fishing-wise, even for those of us who love a challenge !

“When the important hatches of Tricorythodes were first discovered by anglers, Caenis was given the credit. We now know that the Caenis mayflies are a different group, smaller and less common in trout streams, and they hatch in the evening instead of the morning.

They very rarely elicit selective feeding, but when they do they’re very tough to match because they’re often much smaller than size 28. This difficulty has earned them the nickname “Angler’s Curse.”

simple enough to say, even if these early observers didn’t have a watch or map… what comes out in the end in practical terms for us fly anglers is these thingies are very-very small and their proportions are completely off from the larger mayfly species as they have stout bodies, specially the thorax and long tails and antennae and the wings tend to sit out on the sides ‘spent-like’ instead of the usual top: basically the trigger points we’ll want to recreate when tying these flies.

here’s some reference vintage plates of our beautiful little friends to use while we’re at the tying bench. enjoy !

caenis_luctuosa_by_guiguiblitz-d5zfqamcaenis 2caenis 3and just because its so cool to see details millions of times bigger than life size,
caenis parts

angler’s curse quote via TroutNut.com
vintage plates via Google Images

drying off

by Takashi Kuwahara

false casting drawingreminds me of something my fishing mentor repeated several hundred times when i was a kid:
“You may think you’re fishin’ but that fly aint fishin’ if it aint in the water”

which also leads to this tip: if you need to dry off a fly by false casting, do this away from the fish to keep the flying line, its reflections and shadows away from their view. off the shoulder, side casting, whatever it takes, there’s almost always space somewhere around you to do this. when you feel the job is done switch back to the original casting plane and present. bingo !

‘Somebody left this behind…

another lovely drawing from Takashi Kuwahara that brings a thought:

when returning a captured fish we give it the chance to grow, reproduce and then we all get to capture it and it’s offspring again and continue the cycle.
when we loose a fly to a tree we’re giving another angler the opportunity to try it out and hopefully find success with our dearly departed, continuing the fly’s life cycle…

'somebody left this behind

Takashi Kuwahara

nothing i could say could do justice to these wonderful drawings so i’ll stick to one word: enjoy !

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Takashi obviously knows a thing or two about fly casting. respect.

Takashi fly castingfor more of his gorgeous work click HERE

Jason’s catching up

as a lot of us casting geeks know, Jason Borger‘s been working on his  soon to be out (and looooong-awaited !) ‘Single-Handed Fly Casting – A Modular Approach’ book so we’ll half-pardon him for not keeping up with Jeff Kennedy and their Drawing Fish and Flies 52 weekly challenge but once again, the wait was worth it !
here’s a Popsicle splash
50dff52-popsicle-121512-large
and here a Royal Wulff 49dff52-rwulff-120812
one for every flavor, both gorgeous.
enjoy !

The little, inexpressive eye is the only opening through this crust.

by Fumitaka Kudo

” When fish fossils found on mountains were believed to be

evidence for the Biblical Flood, Leonardo da Vinci proposed that

they were actually remains of organisms that had lived before

mountains were raised. A theory very close to that of modern paleontology.

During the last three months at HSF, Fumitaka Kudo drew a series of small and large scale

works on paper with the painstakingly technique of Leonardo’s drawings.

But his studies are visualizing with scientific precision large, impossible creatures, which could have

only swum in the depths of Flood’s waters. The intricate web of signs that compose the fish’s epidermis

is the product of a repetitive gesture and constitute a diagram of manual fatigue.

The little, inexpressive eye is the only opening through this crust. “