a Griffith’s Gnat variant

here’s a seriously interesting emerger offshoot of the infamous G-Gnat.
created by Blue Ribbon Flies and demonstrated by Tim Flagler at MidCurrent, this little bug should do the do and do it well anywhere there’s teeny-tiny midges coming off and dancing about the surface. this one’s in size 20 but the basic idea in various tones and sizes to match your local bugs are sure to raise some trouty interest.
maybe its just me as it took me a little while to figure out the G-Gnat component in this pattern but fly names are fly names and its always good to respectfully attach a variant to its original, and said component happens to be: a very volume-reduced few turns of grizzly hackle over a short peacock herl thorax. those few turns are good enough for me and i’m positive, more than enough for a hungry fish. enjoy !

’round and round with Davie

in a wonderful example that a fly tier can have ADHD (or be drunk and confused) and still manage to make a wonderful fly, Davie’s two-versioned tutorial of the same generalised imitation where wings and thorax get interchanged shows us some fine, yet-so-easy fly tuning that simple rearrangements can produce. more than just a groovy example of mixing and matching, this fly thing  seems to be just the ticket as a really good searching pattern or when there’s several types of bugs on the water. mayflies, caddis, hawthorn, crickets and you name it. it looks buggy as bug and’ll leave a lot for the fish to see below, in the surface film and above the water. that’s a lot of good points for a fly to have.  enjoy !

Once and Away

once_and_awayFly: Hans van Klinken, Photograph: Hans Weilenmann

” After a few attempts I decided on a tying a fly that I thought might be successful. It was with considerable interest that I tried it out. My confidence in it was established within the first few casts. In the same time as it had taken me to catch fish on the previous day I caught many more. I called the fly the “Once and Away”, since I had a great deal of difficulty in getting the pattern to float again after it had been dragged down by a fish. When I came home. I change the dressing to a better-looking and more durable pattern. To find a reasonable solution was not at all easy and drove me almost crazy. Finely after three months it was the thoughts behind the Rugged Caddis and Culard, which give me the answer. It is still funny to say and confess that just a simple cutting operation on the fly design cost me months to find out. Again I developed a pattern were CDC has been used against all rules. “

just goes to show that some rules are better bent…
here we have the origin of the ShuttleCock style of emergers from it’s creator, Hans Van Klinken of ‘KlinkHammer’ fame (and many more). featured along with the complete step-by-step of the original pattern is the story behind this most excellent fly and its design. great inspiring stuff indeed ! (and a reminder that duck roadkill should never be ignored)

click the pic for the full tutorial on Hans Weilenmann’s excellent site Flytier’s Page, enjoy !

a floating spider

greatly inspired by Lucian Vasies’ yummy ‘the Italian Job’, here’s a first (for me) combination of a somewhat traditional North Country style Spider  generic emerger pattern with a cdc floating wing puff to keep the main part of the fly stuck in the surface film. the puff also serves to keep an eye on the fly to detect the very gentle takes that often happen when fishing these types of flies in very calm waters or lakes. the scrufy-fluffy body combined with the hen hackle give a strong impression of life and in this case, of an insect struggling to break through the surface film.

floating spider

made with:
love
hook- Partridge vintage Captain Hamilton barbless #18
thread- Veevus 14/0 brown
abdomen- a cdc mix of fiery red and brown in a dubbing loop
hackle- Whiting Brahma hen, natural brown wound behind and in front of the cdc wing
wing puff- cdc natural

you’ll find most materials used and a lot more at Lucian’s online shop TroutLine

the Italian job.

by Lucian Vasies

what a quirky name for such a cool fly ! :mrgreen:

italian-job 1
devised for inciting winter grayling in the crystal-clear waters of Eastern Europe, this simple yet ingenious generic pattern is bound to be a real success anywhere, particularly on calmer waters, tricky flat sections of rivers and lakes.

i love the one-turn hen hackle legs and antennae and the thin, silk-only body reminiscent of North Country Spiders while being a floating fly. you got it, just the CDC wing will be above the water and the rest will be stuck in the surface film: an emerger stuck in and out, a particularly vulnerable moment in an aquatic bug’s (ex) life…  irresistible !   italian job 2

click either pic for Lucian’s step by step and materials list, enjoy !

breaking out the Break Out Emerger

by Hans Weilenmann

scruffy, shucky, drabby, emergingly great !
Han’s once again demonstrates his impeccable craft with this just-below-the surface general emerger pattern originally created by Loren Williams*. as always, be sure to check out all the little tying details that make Hans’ flies the great flies that they are.
vary size and colors to match your local bugs. enjoy !

* not to be confused with Lauren Williams.

the Polish Puffs

simple and sweet, here’s a little breakfast puffs emerger !

since there’s no tying explanations you can find the materials list and backup photo step-by-step here.

and speaking of puffs…

M-Fly part III

i’ve been getting a lot of mails asking about the tying details and Lucian was kind enough to share the step by step of this lovely fly so here it is for all.

what i realize now and explains why i wasn’t happy with the wing on my first tie is-
i was using the feather tip with the stem like on an F-fly.
a much easier, better and neater result  is achieved by pulling off the appropriate amount of fibers and tying them in, one color after the other. this also means less feather waste and the ability to chose exactly the fibers we want on just about any feather as opposed to searching for ‘the perfect tip’.
neater as well because nipping off the fiber tips with the thumb nail to get the right shape and length is a lot nicer looking without the feather stem.
yet another advantage is, without the stem the wing collapses completely while casting which prevents dreaded/sucky fly/leader twist. (it springs back to it’s initial shape after the energy of the cast has dissipated)

back to the bench for me, thanks again Lucian !

access the sbs by clicking the pic. enjoy !