Fly Casting- the Vertical Hoop drill

a lot of fly casting practise involves using rings, a hoop or any other object placed on the ground. this teaches us target distance acquisition and of course, accuracy.

the next step up from there is placing that hoop or something similar vertically and casting through it. (in her fantastic book Fly Casting Techniques, Joan Wulff offered the idea of casting through a car window and later varying the opening of that window by making it go up or down) this vertically-oriented target, or rather ‘loop passage space’ adds loop size to the previous learned skills.

what’s the point ? apart from variety, fun and a nice game to play with other casting nerds, learning to control loop size is really important when casting into the wind because a small loop takes up a lot less physical space and is less influenced by wind. casting into the wind needs a higher line speed as well and we can just add the extra line speed drill to the ‘through the hoop’ exercise.

the other very obvious reason is when having to cast with obstacles either in front of us or behind. those obstacles will vary greatly but maybe the most common are trees and their branches as in the pic below.'between the branches m.fauvet-TLC 11-2-16

this was a while back in deepest-darkest Sweden and if memory’s correct, the only available back casting space i had was a little tunnel about 1 metre and a half wide. i put this pic here as a reminder of how important it is to do the hoop drill on the back cast as well as in front. it goes without saying that turning around and aiming for the empty space is the only way this is going to happen with success.

this great little clip from Chris Morris shows the hoop drill in both real time and slomo. variances of the drill could be varying the casting distances, how much line is shot through the hoop, side casting with loops at various angles and when you get good at this, casting at an angle instead of straight on. (the hoop’s height remains the same but its width ‘ovals’ and narrows, for lack of a better physics term) that one’s tricky !

practise never really makes perfect but it always makes gooder so here’s hoping this will inspire a few to do just that. enjoy !

Presentation Casts- DownStream Dry Fly

here’s another great presentation casting tip from Aitor Coteron.

along the lines of Jason Borger‘s downstream presentation ‘Undercut Drop’ (see diagram) and similar in concept as Jim William’s upstream ‘Pull-back-Slack‘, Aitor’s videos show us a super-easy way to get better drag-less drifts.
the common denominator casting-wise is these casts are all based on the same principles and casters of all levels can rejoice because there’s no need to learn and practice any fancy twists, curves, unreliable and wind-dependant tricky piles or wiggles either during-or-after-the-cast movements.
the bonus here is these casts are real, effective fishing casts of great value to any fisher: bread and butter stuff we can consistently rely on and not some iffy maybe-may or maybe-not presentation. in other words, the simpler the better.
everyone who knows me knows how much i love fiddly, curvy casts. outside of the fun factor, i firmly believe it make us better casters because we need to get creative and try to deal with several exterior elements like wind or body movement inconsistencies or whatever else you’d care to add but as more time goes by i try to get the same results in simpler, more easily repeatable manners and today’s videos are super-fine examples of just that kind of practical/effective reductionism.

Jason Borger ffw-undercutdrop

with either one we’ll want to:
– cast directly in line with the current. this is the key to making these casts work and means the angler needs to position themselves in the seam or just to the side of the lane to be fished prior to presenting.
in river fishing we’ll almost always have micro currents to deal with but the big nasty drag issues happen when we have to cast across conflicting currents and the most difficult part of dealing with drag is eliminated, or at least greatly reduced when the fly line and current seam are the same. it just makes sense.
– as previously mentioned, cast straight to the target and the best part about that is just about any fly angler already has that skill down pat. the only thing to keep in mind and as in any other slack line cast, we’ll need to plan the use of more line than when presenting ‘straight to the rise’.
– last somewhat denominator (but i’ll still put them in the same cast family because all rod tip mend movements are basically vertical) is all three casts require either keeping the rod tip high, where it stopped at the ‘stop’, (Jason’s Drop), or drop the rod tip (Jim’s Drop and Pull-Back) or Zeljko’s ‘Drag-Back’ after the ‘stop’ and before line touch-down.

“Very conflicting currents, like those shown here, are a killer for fishing the dry fly with an upstream presentation. Using a downstream approach (when conditions allow it) leads to incredibly long drag-free drifts. Master fly fisher Zeljko Prpic shows how to do it right.” and he sure does… enjoy !

 

and a variant with the very same ‘in-the-seam’ presentation as above but using a reach mend, rather handy when getting into the seam is difficult to wade to or off of the bank.
one last thing, the video says dry fly but this’ll work just as well with whatever fly you have tied on, wet, nymph or dry.

 
ps- Jason’s blog Fish, Flies and Water is currently under reconstruction but be sure to check it out regularly if you don’t want to miss out on the good stuff and, if you’re not familiar with Aitor’s blog One More Last Cast, you should be…