spin7

Fly Tying- More on Tying Thread Twist

good things come and go and the UKFDUKFlyDressing forum recently and very unfortunately did just that.
it’s hard to put a rating on fly tying forums but i always really appreciated this one, there was so much to learn from very talented tiers, excellent tips and tricks and step-by-steps and always a helping hand for anyone with a query.

along with Dennis Shaw’s amazing A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial and several other tying goodies previously posted here on TLC, today’s nicey is about thread twist.
this twisting is inevitable but we can control it, create more, reduce it and use either one to our advantage depending on what we want or need. knowing this an invaluable aid to any tier. in a sense it’s just as important as any other tying technique and one all tiers of all levels should be familiar with.
once again, thanks again to the whole UKFD crew for sharing such good stuff throughout the years and allowing me to keep some of it alive here.
on with the show, enjoy !


Don’t get in a Twist by Tango

The majority of threads have a clockwise twist. For a right handed tyer when you wrap the thread around the hook you put another full twist in for every turn taken around the shank. This tightens or cords the thread even more. You must learn to use this to your advantage i.e. when tying in materials/whip finishing/making a rib from thread.
No twist in thread
spin1

Wrapped to bend and a twist in there, not much but it affects the behaviour of the thread.
spin2
If you leave the twist in and try and take a soft turn over the materials the thread will want to lie to the right, this makes it difficult to get the thread where you want it.
spin3
Spin the bobbin anticlockwise and it takes the twist out, this make the thread lie straight and it goes where you want it to.
spin4
You can also spin the bobbin more to put an anticlockwise twist in the thread, this makes the thread lie to the left, you can use this to make the soft loop over your fingers and slide the thread down to the tie in point.
spin7

Why bother?
If you leave the twist in there and whip finish the thread bunches and knots, this usually results in the thread snapping and the whip finish coming undone.

It really does make it easier to tie in materials.

When to take the twist out?
Before tying in materials, whip finishing, splitting thread for dubbing and when you want the thread to lay flat – this reduces bulk.

Exceptions?
Pearsall’s silk has an anticlockwise twist, to split this thread you need to spin the bobbin clockwise. There may be more.

When to put twist in?
When you “post” upright wings it will take fewer wraps than untwisted thread.
When making a rib from thread, you won’t see a flat wrap.

For a left handed tyer it does the opposite, it takes the twist out of the thread, with some threads this can weaken it.

There is also two types of thread, BONDED and UNBONDED, bonded thread (i.e. Uni-Thread) will not lay flat but still suffers from the effects of twist. Also bonded thread will not split so you cannot use it for split thread dubbing technique, MP Magic tool techniques etc.

 

Fly Tying- a Perfect Embryo

here’s a super-nifty tying trick from Gilbert Rowley

i’m neither pro nor con when it comes to egg patterns. as far as today’s tutorial goes, i’ll even completely disassociate from the fact that its an egg imitation and focus in on the rather ingenious idea of covering up a bead or beads whilst creating a body shape.
eggs are pretty much round but one of the beauties of using UV resins is it can be built-up and shaped at will; more on one side, less on the other. UV resin can be cured in successive steps and doesn’t need to be applied in one go. with that in mind we can easily recreate shapes like these or any others we can think of while still adding a fair amount of weight to the fly.
tungsten body shapes

and that’s where Gilbert’s tutorial really shines, at least in my eyes: an inspiration on simple, inexpensive, modular, creative use of weight and fly shape. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Making an Easy flat Lead Tape substitute

“If you can’t find Lead Tape/Foil then why don’t you make your own using a Seam Roller….. ?”

Davie McPhail‘s question/suggestion says it all. first of all, flat lead tape, whether sticky-back or not isn’t always easy to find and it’s more expensive than it should be. on the other hand, round profiled lead wire is easily abundant and quite cheap, specially when bought in larger spools.
secondly, unless we’re going for a bulky build-up of the fly’s profile, flat lead has several advantages the round stuff can’t do. flattening round wire doesn’t change it’s weight which means that for the same amount/weight of wire we can get either get a slimmer profile and not end up with a small, short, squat obese nymph… or, add approximately twice the weight of round wire with subsequent layers of the flat stuff without getting a fatter profile than a single wrap of round. (i hope that makes sense…😆 )

finally, the flat stuff lets us be more creative and specific as to how much weight we add to the fly while easily controlling the profile that we want: its all good.

tip- although a seam roller works best and is worth the purchase in the long run, any burnishing-type tool, an old Bic pen or even a hammer will work great in a pinch. lead is soft and takes little pressure to deform.

Davie’s on a how-to/tying tips and tricks roll these days so, here’s a first for us to eat up, enjoy !

ps- don’t forget that lead is poisonous. don’t go picking your nose, scratching your eyes, eating fried chicken while having sex and licking your fingers after without washing your hands first, Ok ?

Fly Tying- a Blae and Black/Black Pennell two-in-one wet fly

blae
[bley, blee]
Origin
adjective, Scotland and North England
1. bluish-black; blue-gray.

“Ye must be fair starving, Paul,” quoth she softly with her hand on my arm, and I daresay my face was blae with cold and chagrin.
‘The Shoes of Fortune’, Neil Munroblae and black McPhail

now, what’s interesting in this fly’s name is that it doesn’t have any blue components.

ok, black materials almost always have either a blueish or reddish highlight reflection when/if the light hits it just right but it doesn’t matter a single bit because i’m rambling about something irrelevant instead of getting to the point which is: this a f’n awesome fish catching and beautiful fly.

as for the two-in-one and noted in the vid, this pattern is a Black Pennell with a wing. the Black Pennell wet designed by Mr H. Cholmondley (pronounced Chumley) Pennell is a classic that shouldn’t need any introduction to anyone born since 1870.

“Quoting from Fly Patterns and Their Origins by Harold Hinsdill Smedly; “H. Cholmondeley Pennel, 1837-1913, English poet-sportsman and author of The Angler Naturalist 1864; Modern Practical Angler, 1873; The Sporting Fish of Great Britain, Modern Improvements in Fishing Tackle, and Salmon & Trout , 1885, of which he was also an editor, was the originator of that type of hackle fly known as the “Pennell Hackle.” He also originated the turned down eyed and tapered hook which carry his name.
His choice and recommendation of that particular type of hackle fly was in three colors: brown, yellow and green. The body, instead of being bushy or soft, was hard, silk wrapped and thin. The hackle, tied very sparsely, was a little longer than usual.
Although he probably did not realize it when he recommended these patterns of thin bodies and lightly dressed hackles, he started something, for many tiers now recommend and say “dress sparsely,” but he was the first to realize that a lightly dressed fly was oftentimes better than one too heavily dressed.” *

history aside, whether this pattern needs a wing or not to be effective is most probably anyone’s guess and not the fish’s. what it will obviously do however is give the fly a bigger profile and make it look like a bigger somethingoranother instead of a smaller somethingoranother. the good thing about including a wing is it can always be trimmed off waterside with our nippers when big(ger) isn’t on the day’s menu.

enough talk, here’s how to tie the beast. enjoy !

since we’re Pennelling today and variety being the spice of life and all that, here’s an anorexic version of the standard BP tied by superman-tier Hans Weilenmann. following Han’s method you’ll be hard-pressed fitting a wing in there but we all know this fly doesn’t need a wing…

* quote source: Fly Anglers Online

step-5-flytying.ro-the-T-side-of-biot-by-Lucian-Vasies

Fly Tying- More on Biots

today’s tying tutorial treat comes to us from Romania via buddy  Lucian Vasies, one of my favourite all-time trout-type fly tiers.

we’d previously seen a more-than-nice introduction to this great fly body material in What are biots ? and Lucian’s just-out article comes in to seal the deal and help you get the most from these feather parts. here’s a few extracts:

-when you strip the barb from the stem of the feather you will notice that the structure is not symmetrical. The base is transparent and the upper part is more opaque. Also you’ll see a small gap at the base . This gap is a reference for us in tying process.
step-5-flytying.ro-how-looks-closer-a-biot-by-Lucian-Vasies

The opposite part of the gap is not so transparent and in section has a “T” shape. The barb has a small fin/burr. This fin will provide you a very nice segmentation and you can see it in the photo bellow between arrows:”
step-5-flytying.ro-the-T-side-of-biot-by-Lucian-Vasies

and here are a few results on the different ways to use biots. need i say more ?

step-8-flytying.ro-wide-steps-Lucian-Vasies

step-9-flytying.ro-slim-body-Lucian-Vasies
well, yes because i can’t help it… as noted in the article and easily seen and demonstrated in the images above is one of the biot’s fantastic properties: its translucency.
be sure to keep that in mind and use it to its full advantage by strategically selecting an appropriately toned thread or other material under-wrap to reflect light through the wound biot. in the examples above the underbody used was white thread but the possibilities are endless. if you really want the colours to ‘pop’ you could always lay a base of flashabou or similar mirrory-like material and  conversely, you can always tone down and dull or subtly change the biot’s colour by again selecting a primary thread base colour to let it show through the biot. here’s a colour wheel chart to help you mix and match. as we see on the chart, if we have a yellow biot placed over a blue underbody we’ll have a greenish/olive result. 

’nuff said ! click either pic for the complete article. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Deviating Charlie’s Nuke Egg

some people like egg patterns and some people don’t but what i’m seeing in Charlie Craven’s great step-by-step tutorial is a tying technique that’ll be of interest to any fly fisher. (except for the die-hard dry fly purist… )

Charlie's Nuke Egg

– as is, the Nuke of course looks like a very yummy fish egg still encapsulated by its embryonic sac but if we play with the basic pattern, use an as-close-to-clear as possible egg yarn and say, add two big black eyes we’ll have a fantastic alevin imitation.
– if we don’t add the veil and use that same egg construction shape and stack several close together along the hook shank and then trim to shape once the yarn is all fluffed out we have a really interesting, super-easy, translucent, lively and very attractive streamer body.
– the very same egg shape would make a much nicer head for egg-sucking leeches than the typical chenille.
– this stuff doesn’t hold water for long so we can easily build up a bulky fly body and still have something easy to cast.
– i’m sure there’s plenty of other uses to this technique i haven’t thought of but by now i’m equally sure you’ll see that it’s not just about egg patterns.

click the pic for Charlie’s complete step-by-step. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Building a better Boobie

by Philip Rowley

Boobie flies, lovem’ or hatem’. personally, i’m somewhere in between but loving them or not isn’t really the point of today’s post but one of cleverly thought-out fly design and technique(s). we’ve already seen a myriad of tying videos here on TLC and this is one of the most thoroughly thought-out and complete ones i’ve ever had the pleasure of studying and here’s why:

– a curved hook always gets my preference when it fits with the fly’s design and this one fits it super-well. as alluded to in the video, these flies can be easily be inhaled and a curved-in hook point in my opinion not only holds fish better once hooked but really help in keeping the fly in the fish’s mouth instead of down its throat. even if you’re not a die-hard barbless fisher (and you should be !) please either find a similar factory barbless or crush the barb well when tying these patterns.

– thickish tying thread as stated makes for better tying-in of thin foam parts as it’s less likely to cut through. besides, there’s no need for finesse here.

– trimming marabou fibres from the stalk instead of using the feather’s tip is the way to go. even if the tip seems flexible it isn’t half as flexible as the fibres lower down the feather and, because of the asymmetry of the tip’s fibres it’s a lot harder to get a good, even bunch along the whole tail’s length.

– the thread wrap between the tail and hook shank greatly improves the tail’s position and swim. all you need is one snug wrap to get this.

– trimming the tied-in tail by tearing them off with the fingers because nothing makes a ‘deader’ tail than by trimming it with scissors.

– ‘made-for-Boobies’ chenille really makes a difference from the standard synthetic chenille. this particular model isn’t very translucent which can be a good or a lesser good thing but the more important element with this pattern-type-specific material is the way it moves when fished. the fibres fold back on retrieve and resume their original shape when stopped and this gives the fly’s body a ‘breathing’ effect while still holding its structure to push water, give a very visible profile and combined with the foam eyes, creates a water-flow turbulence which in turn greatly enhances the tail’s movement even with the slightest and slowest retrieve. in other words, the fly doesn’t need to be torn through the water to make it come alive and its the combination of all these elements that makes these patterns so effective in triggering strikes.

– unless you’re going to tie a lot of these things, factory-made foam eyes are the way to go as they’re perfectly symmetric. its not an aesthetic thing but one of how the symmetric eyes will be perfectly balanced. asymmetric eyes make the fly swim erratically and usually twist on itself during the retrieve and that’s no good.

lots of good stuff there easily transposed to a whole lot of other less offensive patterns so, there isn’t a lot to hate is there ?
be sure to watch in HD by clicking the video’s settings button, enjoy !

Tim’s Little Black Stone

by Tim Flagler via TightLineVideo

hard to think of a nicer, simpler, great surface footprinted, Wonder-Winged, low-riding adult stonefly pattern.
harder yet to think of anything else i could add to what looks like the end-all stonefly imitation except for… enjoy !

ps- well ok, just one thing. try not to crowd the hook eye so much with excess materials when you’re tying your own…😆

Fly Tying- April tells us all about her Rhea

first, here’s the beast.
3 Rheas well, three of them…

as for the telling all about part, here’s April Volkey giving what’s in my mind/experience the finest and most thought-out fly tying material how-to-use demonstration i’ve ever seen.
it’s not about constructing a specific pattern but about exploring the endless possibilities and hands-on practical aspects of this long, durable and very lively fibre and incorporating it to all manner of salmon, steelhead flies or basically any kind of wet fly or streamer whether it be for fresh or saltwater. be sure to watch it in HD, enjoy !

 

as for the beast itself, click on the threesome for more info.

Fly Tying- Some new twists on an Old Cahill

by Tim Flagler via TightLineVideo

a nifty little yellow floating nymph bug indeed ! this little fellow would have come in super-handy a few weeks back in the UK when the Yellow Mays where coming off.
of special tying note and as starters, we’ll revisit a nice and easy way to get splayed mayfly tails with the main course consisting of a really unique manner to create a non-wobbly, stiff, easy to use hackle post with an even more ingenious manner to permanently secure the parachute hackle in just three ultra-simple steps. ya gotta love such brilliant ideas, enjoy !

post note (and just to be unnecessarily picky… )
– personally, i’d leave a few more tail fibres on each side of the fly to a) leave a bigger footprint on the surface that can also hold more floatant and b) even though Coq de Leon fibres are pretty strong, trout teeth are even stronger and the extra fibres usually means having at least a few left if one or several get torn off after a catch.
– i’d also use less UV resin when strengthening the post and over a shorter length to get a shorter overall post but like i wrote, that’s just being picky.

fly tying- whipping up a fluff cat

by Matthew Pate via HMHFlyFishing

at first glance, this Cat might look like any other bunny-leech type streamer/lure/attractor fly but on second look there’s that green skirt made of Chrystal Hackle or Pseudo Hackle, a fine-fibred synthetic wrapped as one would a feather hackle in between the tail and body that sets this pattern apart from typical B-Leeches for two reasons-
firstly, the green fibres blend in with the bodies’ bunny hair acting as a subtle yet strong trigger point for the fish to see from a distance.
and secondly, because its a little stiffer than bunny fur (what isn’t… ) the green skirt puffs out the bodies’ hair a little and gives a bigger profile to the body when wet and this bigger body in turn makes the tail wiggle more.
it’s a hydrodynamic turbulence thing and for us fishers it a really good thing as this lets the tail waggle sexily without having to speed up line retrieve and this gives the fish plenty of time see and get dazzled and seduced by all this tail action !

designed as a stillwater lure, a little tweaking here and there like adding bead-chain eyes or dumbells or a lead wire underbody to add more weight and in different sizes and colours to match your area makes this basic design a really basic fly for just about any waters. well tied and well explained, we can tell Matthew doesn’t just slap on materials onto a hook. take note of all the finer details in this fly’s construction and you won’t go wrong. enjoy !

Fly Tying videos- Stew’s Glassy Spider

by Hans Weilenmann

a direct descendant of Stewart’s Black Spider, Hans’ variant will be it’s perfect companion for when fish aren’t interested in fashionable black and want something less Gothy yet still yummy.
hard to find simpler to tie, don’t hesitate to also make up a few in various brown or olive tones and as always in different sizes. enjoy !

Fly Tying Tutorials- the Silver Invicta

The Invicta was originally known as The Pride of Devon, The Silver Invicta is a variation of the original Invicta fly pattern. The Invicta Caddis wet fly pattern was first mentioned in James Ogden’s book “Ogden on fly tying” which was published in 1879.

that’s 136 years of being a classic fly that not only greatly appeals to fly fishing and tying history buffs but more importantly, to fish. designed to imitate a drowned caddis with its long wing and hackles that imitates legs and a yellow tail to probably imitate eggs, this pattern also works very well as a small bait imitation. primarily designed with still waters in mind used with various retrieves or ‘dead-drifted’ across a wind-swept feeding lane, i’ve had great success with this fly in rivers fished either across with little steady pulls of the line or with the standard ‘down-and-across’ swing.
sure to raise a few hackles from the purists and spurred from the at-the-time reluctance/apprehension i had to try to include matched wing slips to my flies, i’ve had great success by replacing said wing with marabou, fox hair, fine deer hair, swiss straw or simply taking a bunch of fibres from a feather that ‘looks about right’, folding them once or twice and tying the lot on top. although matched wing slips are beautiful at the vise or in the box and are a great way to get a lot of Facebook likes… i’m personally convinced they offer no ‘fishable’ advantage as they’ll just get matted and out of that lovely shape once wet and specially after a fish or two have nibbled on it for a bit.

as always with Davie McPhail’s tutorials, today’s treat not only shows how to tie this lovely Invicta properly but there’s also several tying tips and tricks that transfer over to many-many other patterns. enjoy !

 

Belly Scratcha !

just looking at these two pics should dispense the need for any further commentary…

Belly Scratcher Minnow FlyFishFood

we’ve all seen a lot of awesome streamer patterns but in my opinion, if ever there was a ‘good as good gets’ little fish imitation with all the right elements then i haven’t seen it yet. as we clearly see on the top image, beads strung on a wire well away from the hook shank will force the fly to ride hook-point up, help to not snag so much on the river bed or debris and track straight. the weight is still in the front part of the pattern but the ballast’s placement provides a more horizontal swim than dumbbell eyes can give. specifically built for rivers on a floating line, i can see the basic design working anywhere. as noted in the vid, simply add more or less beads depending on your specific depth and current speed needs or if you want to fish them with sinking lines.

baby belly scratcher FFF

here’s the tying tutorial but be sure to click either pic to access the complete article on yet another fantastic tutorial from the bearded bros at FlyFishFood. enjoy !

Fly Tying Videos- Tim’s Caddis Larvae

by Tim Flagler at tightlinevideo
man, i really love Tim’s tutorials. everything about them; the well and thoroughly thought out descriptions, high film quality, crisp and clear instructions and overall pleasant learning atmosphere make these videos a real gem and this new one’s one of the best he’s produced.
based on a simple go-to caddis larvae suggestive pattern, we’re also treated to fantastic thread control and split-dubbing techniques well worth paying special attention to.  this video deserves to be bookmarked as a reference and is a super-fine video backup to the very same techniques brought up in Dennis Shaw’s more-than-fantastic A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial. enjoy !

this little image gives a nice, simple and generalised visual reference of the bug’s key elements for the tier to keep in mind when tying these imitations.
hydrphsy
should you want to have a slightly more visible segmentation, don’t hesitate tying a few flies with a darker thread that matches the thorax’s dubbing. the darker thread will show through the abdomen a little when wet.
as always, adapt colours and fly size to match your local bugs. lead or standard wire wrapped around the shank will help the fly get down in faster/deeper waters. if you do add weight, use a little less dubbing to preserve the correct proportions or the finished fly will look like a fast-food junky…

Fly Tying- A new twist: The Burned Chenille Cased Caddis

before
pycnocentrodes_huia_rubymontage_b_650

and after
maxresdefault

there are many ways to create a caddis case, here’s just a few:
– the standard spun and trimmed or burned deer hair which looks pretty nice but doesn’t help the fly sink much as its a buoyant material (and i really don’t like doing this kind of stuff with deer hair. in fact, i don’t like tying with deer hair at all !)
– dubbing which is a lot more pleasanter to work with but never quite looks like a caddis case. (that probably doesn’t matter fishing-wise, its just not an appealing look and doesn’t strike that fly ‘confidence’ thingy; that all-important selection sense that dictates which fly to use)
– some even glue teeny-tiny stones to a support to form a very realistic case but that’s way too anal for this guy…

– and then, as we’ll see in the first minutes of the video, a technique that at first looks like a delirious joke that then transforms into the lovely tube-blob in the pic above and to make it all even better, this happens with our second favourite element: fire !

i just tried this method (just the case part), its super quick, about a minute to tie in and form the whole ‘body’ and very easy.
after that i tried a different method of melting on a second body by removing it from the vise and holding the hook with forceps leaving more room to work (melt) with. this helped to make the body more symmetric, specially the butt end near the vise jaws.
(an added bonus here is you won’t ruin or discolour the anodisation of your vise’s jaw)
second variant was to wet my fingers with gooey saliva to smooth out the body instead of using a needle. this works really well to get a quite perfect shape but you have to get your timing right or you end up with a cased finger combo !…

enough words, on to this great tutorial by Hammer Creek Fly Fishing.  enjoy !

a Nice and Nifty Knotted Knaddis Nymph

another super-nice tying tutorial for a more-than-realistic-enough caddis larvae imitation by Hammer Creek Fly Fishing

hammer creek knotted nymph

well explained and pleasant to listen to, we’ll get to easily assimilate the simple construction process of the woven body, a method easily transposed to many other insect types and patterns with any variety of different weaving materials. the mind’s the limit.
as noted at the end of the video and something i really like, is the light coat of varnish over the whole back portion of the fly to “melt everything together” giving the finished result ‘that special touch’ and a lovely translucency. enjoy !

on a personal note although not meant as criticism, i’d recommend not starting the body so far down the bend of the hook as this greatly reduces effective hook space (its fish-holding properties) or better yet, simply using a bigger sized hook with the same fly material proportions or finding a different hook with a wider gape such as the awesome Competition Demmon G600 BL.

Fly Tying- Herman’s Roy-style Reversed Parachute micro caddis

Herman as in deGala and Roy as in Christie !

i of course don’t mean any disrespect as i really like this video and Herman’s demeanour but ! apart from the bright green egg sack, to be honest, i can’t for the life of me see this fly as anything caddisy… but (again) ! lets have a closer look at this fly’s other component, one we can easily transfer over to countless other dry/emerger/floating nymph patterns; the Christie-style Parachute hackling method.

no style is an end-all but this one really stands out from the crowd on several levels, most notably by its ‘puffed-up in a ball’ fibre positions but also overall strength and resistance to fish teeth and other abrasions.
more ‘traditional’ hackling around the hook shank has the fibres oriented vertically when the fly is resting at the surface whereas others where the hackle is wound on a post such as the Klinkhammer or Christie styles have them horizontally, parallel to the water’s surface.
generally speaking, vertical fibres will have only their tips in contact with the water’s surface, thus the fly’s body is suspended above the surface whereas horizontal fibres are splayed out on the water. the latter leaves a bigger imprint on the surface but also does a better job at suspending what’s beneath it, in this case, the fly’s body or ‘floating nymph’ as it where.

as to it’s sturdiness, what makes this one so close to the proverbial bullet-proofness is that the hackle stem is enclosed within the nylon loop. should one segment be torn, the rest still hold their place, something traditionally wound hackles can’t claim. one little nick and the fly needs to be changed.
i don’t loose a lot of flies so how they hold up through time is important. (i’m also very lazy when it comes to tying sessions, or rather, it’s hard for me to actually start tying flies. once i’ve started i can’t stop and it’s not like flies are precious but i just don’t know when i’ll feel like tying again so the ones that have hatched are expected to last. i’ve digressed enough….) anyhow !

a while back we’d already seen Roy’s Reverse Parachute step-by-step and complete video tutorial and while Herman’s version isn’t a night and day variant, something about it makes the whole nylon post and hackling method seem simpler, something that should be of great interest for the person wanting to learn and try out this hackling method.

my guess is the ‘simpler’ part might have to do with using a Gallows tool to hold the nylon post vertically and tight whereas Roy does without. i’ve been tying mine for years without the tool and it of course works very well but i’ll give it a try soon as i suspect it makes winding the hackle easier and more importantly, easier to keep the winds compacted close to the hook before tightening the loop.
in a pinch, you can make a little metal hook from a paper clip and attach that to a rubber band, the lot suspended from your tying light or have someone hold the nylon post while you wind the hackle. it only takes a few seconds, plus its a good way to put your partner/spouse/sexdwarf/roommate/butler or whomever’s handy to good use… ummmm, enjoy !

some previously seen yums. i loves yums !

Fly Tying- Mix dubbing easily

a nifty, super-easy to understand tutorial from my buddy and über fly tier Holger Lachmann.

after re-reading Denis Shaw’s fantabulous A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial i noticed that even though the flea comb is shown and used for other purposes, it isn’t used for mixing different types or different shades of material so Holger’s video fills this little gap perfectly. while there are several very good alternatives when mixing larger batches of dubbing, the standard for smaller amounts is simply using our fingers to pull, separate and regroup the materials.
this of course works very well but some materials, notably synthetics that tend to intertwine more than naturals make this task a little more difficult and that’s where the flea comb shines.

a lot of tiers simply buy pre-mixed blends that are readily available and that’s more than fine but in a way, they’re missing out on the possibility of customising the final result’s appearance and in the long run, perhaps its effectiveness in fooling the fish. another aspect of interest when mixing your own is the possibilities are endless. many, many ‘household’ or rather, not-out-of-a-fly shop things can be used to make dubbing, further enhancing creativity which is in my opinion a very big bonus to our craft because its another area where we can put in our own little personal touch while greatly reducing costs.
its all good. enjoy !

Fly Tying- the Double-Decker

no, not this goofy thing,
doubledecker
this one !
DDecker McPhail

nice and nifty and what i like best: lotsa fishing friendly, fish attracting profile with a highly non-bug-species-specific generic aspect.

take special note of Davie’s method of breaking away the wing’s waste hairs by increasing thread tension at the tie in point while tearing the fibres with the other hand. this is a brilliant, fast and tool-less solution for getting a great tapered body without having to cut away and ending up with an unsightly abrupt bump.
why the double wings ? the same amount of deer hair over a larger surface stabilises the fly on the surface, specially in faster flows or choppier water and is more translucent, something that’s gotta be more realistic or at least, less put-offish to the fish below than some dense lump. the larger surface will also help the angler track the fly without having to resort to adding some gaudy fluo pink shit to the fly…

lastly, this winging method of course reminds us of Bob Wyatt’s infamous* Deer Hair Emerger and i can’t help but think that a double-wing version added to it would be the bee’s knees, once again, specially in the faster waters or when it might be a little hard to see the fly or even as a ‘stronger floating’ indicator fly with a nymph or wet hanging below it. good stuff huh ?

thanks again Davie for giving us another great tutorial. enjoy folks !

* yeah, yeah, i know. once a kid always a kid…