brainwashem’ young- Julian’s Wouf-Wouf salmon fly

today’s super-duper tying treat come to us from young Julian Furlaga and be sure to remember that name because i’m very certain we’ll be seeing a lot more from him in the future.
very well tied and explained * and pleasant to watch, Julian’s most excellent tutorial not only shows us how to tie a great salmon/migratory fish pattern but also that these patterns don’t require a rocket science or brain surgery degree to tie; a barrier a lot of adults seem to have a hard time climbing over…

this tutorial’s special and be sure to notice how the lad put on his special Sunday shirt to make the video, enjoy !

* in the fly tying world, ‘palmering‘ means winding a hackle around the hook shank, not pulling hackle fibres back before winding/palmering the hackle to the hook shank. i’m sure Julian will have sussed that out soon.

Fly Tying- How to apply dubbing

clear, concise with all the finer details, Hans Stephenson‘s basic dubbing application tutorial is primarily geared towards the beginners in fly tying but a lot of ‘seasoned veterans’ might just pick up a thing or two as well.
although the dubbing material used in the vid seems to be of the ‘super-easy to apply’ type, note that this method will tame the more difficult materials such as adult seal fur, just to name a what-can-be toughy. enjoy !

for the most complete of all completest dubbing tutorials be sure to check out previously posted Fly Tying: A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial by Dennis Shaw whom i’d like to take the occasion to thank again for sharing such an amazing work with us.

Peacock Quill and How to use it.

by Lucian Vasies

WoW ! here’s a real gem with virtually everything we need to know about peacock quills, how to prepare and use them. thanks Lucian !

” When talking about peacock quill everyone thinks about the stripped barbs of the feathers from the peacock’s tail. Everyone expects it to be wide, nicely colored, gradually from white to dark grey, with a glossy look as if it were waxed. The peacock quill is used because it imitates very good the abdominal part of the dry flies and emergers.
The problem is that a quill of high quality can’t be found anywhere in the feather but only in the area of the eye of the feather. Even so, good feathers are from peacocks older than 5 years. The young ones have thinner feathers and the quill is not so brightly colored.
You can see in the pictures below how to get this quill easily “

go from this-

to this-
 by following just a few easy steps. enjoy !

click on either pic to access the complete tutorial.

be sure to check out Lucian’s online shop troutline.ro for a great selection of fly tying materials, barbless hooks and all sorts of fly fishing goodies.
you’ll find fast and friendly service and all at the best prices.