Fly Fishing- Leader design for streamers

lots of very good info here from Kelly Galloup.
admittedly, these leader designs aren’t universal and are specifically geared towards targeting large trout with large trout streamers in rivers, retrieving them across stream from a drift boat or wading but Kelly’s explanations are well worth listening to as a lot of the very same principles are the same regardless of the targeted species and situation.
of special note is the advise of using short-short leader lengths when using sinking lines (equally valid for sink tips) and the reminder that when using streamers, casting shorter leaders is much-much easier than longer lengths which are also often detrimental to keeping the fly in the right depth zone. another bonus is that ‘leader discretion’ is also unnecessary as these fish are ‘blinded’ by their next meal just like pike and a lot of other predator fish.
simple and easy, there’s no need for store-bought leaders. i don’t know how Kelly feels about them but since the line tip doesn’t come into the rod when landing a fish i’ll use a loop-to-loop line-to-leader connection to be able to change or repair leaders in a snap. it’s all good, enjoy !

tip- try to avoid being distracted by the dancing Hula-Girl or you might miss out on some important stuff !

Fly Lines- Understanding Skagit and Scandinavian Shooting Heads

Demystifying Skagit and Scandinavian Shooting Heads
by Peter Charles via hooked4lifeca

once we get over the infomercial aspect and the ever-false “The Anchor loads the Rod” notion we’re left with a very good and comprehensive, straight, simple and easily understandable description for those wanting to understand modern two-handed rod shooting-head systems and incorporate them to their bag of tricks. enjoy !

Making a furled leader by hand (no tools or jigs)

nope, this won’t be the end-all leader solution for everyone’s needs but it’s for sure a good one to have in your bag of tricks.
what i like best with this video is that it shows us how easy, inexpensive and fast it is to create your own furled leader, hopefully inspiring enough to roll your own and try it out for yourself and experiment with different leader materials, their diameters, taper proportions and length to suit your own needs. have fun !

Amnesia-20lb-red-l  i’ll be trying this out soon with some highly visible Red Amnesia material for casting demos and courses as it can only make the already very visible leader even more visible ! pics to follow.

Typical North Country Spider Leader Setup

we’ve seen quite a bit on North Country Spider patterns and fishing techniques and here, thanks to Stephen Cheetham of Fishing with Style we get some greatly detailed  info and tips on general leaders setups for this method, with and without droppers.

a strong hunch tells me the knot above comes from commercial fishing, most probably used for ‘long-lining’ but it’s just the ticket for these leader setups and also a good one for dry & nymph rigs, particularly when using Reversed-Parchute  as the dropper cannot be attached on the hook bend. good stuff indeed, thanks Stephan !

be sure to click on the image to discover a lovely selection of flies and other goodies. enjoy !

psyche-far out-delic Color-Changing nylon !

via Discoveries + Breakthroughs Inside Science

Nylon fishing line is designed to have some natural stretch to it. But if you pull on it too hard — which happens when fighting to reel in a particularly large fish– it can stretch so much that its structure is badly weakened.”

what’s more relevant in this issue and apparent to anyone who is 1- cognitive and 2- an actual fisher, is how stretch affects knot strength, the over-tightening and consequent weakening of the material by the over-eager, over-excited taurinesque Redbull filled angler being a much greater cause of break-offs than the actual rectilinear strengths of the material.
as seen on the image below, this particular knot is choked at  the standing line side and the remainder of the tippet has changed to a sickly, gross, Alien barf green, a sharp tug and Goodbye Charlie !


“HOW IT WORKS: The new fishing line contains a type of polymer that fluoresces — emits light — when viewed under ultraviolet light. The color of light emitted depends on how much stress the polymer molecule has experienced. When the line is not under stress, the molecules are close together and emit reddish-brown light under a UV lamp. When it stretches, the molecules pull apart and emit green light. A fisherman can check his line under UV light and discard it if it glows green.”

ok, so the first thing i’m thinking is, groovy.
trés groovy indeed but we’ve come to rely on a lot of other aspects in nylon selection that unless this maybe-future color-changing line has all the other qualities we require, we’re pretty unlikely to go out and change all our countless tippet spools for some material that’ll induce yet another anxiety to the fly fisher: the fear of leaders and tippets going Alien-barf green.

on the other hand, using this material to demonstrate that certain knots and connections are better than others would be a great boon for a lot of people.
as an example, we could prove once and for all how the Clinch knot (which i suspect is the contemptible knot above) is utter shite and improve humanity by banning it from the world in a somewhat same manner books where burned in Bradbury’s hot and sticky  Fahrenheit 451.

well yeah, fly fishing purity might just need to happen through fire ! :mrgreen:

click the knot-pic for more info on this new juicy line.

Hinging or Myth…

brillantissime Jim Williams once again !  Jim’s one of those big things that pays attention to the little things in life and here’s a doozy !

this time it’s about connecting loops:

(don’t worry and yes, that’s the WRONG way. it’s only there to hopefully peak your interest enough to click the pic to find the correct way once you’ve finished reading here)

but more importantly and the real gem of this article because hardly ever mentioned: loop size, monofilament stiffness/suppleness and how they all go together as a whole to create a flawless energy-transmitting non-hinging  connection. enjoy !

Double Loop-to-Loop Connection

by Jon B. Cave via Rio‘s blog

a most fantastic find here. as Jon explains in great detail, if the joining line diameters and/or stiffness don’t match, the connection doesn’t seat properly, making it both hinge and weaker.
“The union formed by joining one loop to another is a strong one when properly done (see photo 1); however, if the loop-to-loop knot isn’t executed correctly by drawing the loops tightly together so that they remain seated in place, a hitch may develop at one of the loop ends and weaken the connection (see photo 2).

the solution is as simple as is it ingenious, double the loop ! brilliant !

click here for Jon’s great article.

X-Stripes

here’s a handy little tip if you’re a cheese-brain like me.

problem: we’ve installed the leader and immediately forget what size it is. we want to add tippet and then have to visually compare each tippet spool to find what we need, all the while balancing in the middle of a river and trying to not drop everything in it while we’re fuddling about…

solution: one little stripe with a permanent marker for each ‘X’ of the leader’s original tip diameter and one glance at the leader’s butt tells us all we need to know.

the ‘metrics’ (and i’m one of them) will shout “WTF is an X ” !!!  well, for once this arcane method of designating diameters comes to good use as it’s darn hard to put 0.14 stripes on a leader butt !

here’s a little X to mm guideline that’s good to memorize:

0 X = 0,28mm

1X = 0,25mm

2X = 0,23mm

3X = 0,20mm

4X = 0,18mm

5X = 0,15mm

6X = 0,13mm

7X = 0,10mm

i find the only really important one to remember is 0X = 0,28mm. the others are easy to calculate from there.