hitting a wall

whatever activity it may be it happens to all of us at one point or another. in fact, it happens to me several times a day… but ! today’s fly casting analysis video, while still remaining a bit obscure to me shows us a creative test of doing this wall-hitting on purpose with a fly line:

“Fly leg momentum after the loop is obstructed”

interestingly enough, i’ve done the very same thing many-many times in more of a “i can, therefore i will” mood and because the loop ‘crumpling to bit’s looks cool but there was never any actual study of fly line dynamics type of thing intension involved. leave it to the creative curiosity genius of Lee Cumming‘s brain to try to come up with a purpose with things like this. i’ll view it a few hundred more times to see what i can get out of this before smashing me own head against the wall…
https://vimeo.com/17270656

brainwashem’ young- Kite-Master Eryn

‘Fish Fight Simulator’ by Lee Cummings

actually, i’m not sure if this lovely lass is Millie ‘The Double-Haul Princess’  because they grow so fast… (it turns out it’s Millie’s sister Eryn) but regardless, it’s hard to imagine a better and funner way to teach a kid how to learn to fight a fish and be comfortable with rod and reel management before actually having one on the end of the line.  fun !

fitting into tight spaces

by Lee Cummings

over the last few years and among a whole lot of other things, Lee’s been doing a lot of research on shooting heads and more particularly, short, mini and micro heads to be used in the tightest of areas where other lines can’t deliver (pun intended), such as this little seatrout stream in northern England. Lee C's tiny seatrout stream

sure, the need for these is situation-dependant but it does give us the possibility to fish in areas we might generally pass. (and if we pass them there’s a good chance other anglers do it as well, meaning that fish who aren’t comfortable in high-pressure areas will happily congregate there)

without going into the micro-short, the set up below directly inspired by the Skagit school is a very good example of out of the box thinking even though it actually comes straight of a box without any cutting up, weighing, measuring or other fancy finagling. taking the Skagit concept and scaling it all down gives this, and that’s a good this !

“This awesome little set up is handy for fishing the tightest of the tight when it comes to available casting space.
The head in this example comprises of a 5ft Rio floating Skagit cheater coupled with the 1.5″ per second 15ft sink tip that came with the Rio Skagit system.
The running line is simple mono so as to offer minimum resistance and maximum range to this super short and deadly fishing shooting head.”

related articles

fly casting
spey casting
fly lines

Fly Line Selection: Head lengths, weight distribution and other goodies

continuing with the Fly Line series, today’s gem comes to us from Lee Cummings.LC Triangle SL Gathering

“One of the questions I normally ask a client whilst setting up his/her own equipment is “may I ask what line you are currently using there?” and secondly “what is the head length ?”

These are not trick questions, I just simply wish to learn about the clients mindset as to why they chose that line, or why it was recommended to them. Quite often the client remembers the name of the line manufacturer and even the model name and its AFFTA classification number, but there the knowledge of it often ceases.”

“If a line of inappropriate and excessive head length has been purchased, the angler “after some frustrations” does the sensible thing and only false casts out to a length which they can manage, sadly the outer most reach of their fishing is regulated by a head length issue right there.”

and that’s just a few snippets i hope will wet your appetite for more.

if you’ve ever gone out and bought a well reputed fly line and wondered why it wasn’t living up to your expectations you’ll find some very important thoughts in Lee’s highly recommends article. enjoy !

Getting Head Smart


related articles

Tension Glasses

i remember Lee Cummings bringing this up several years ago and i’m pretty sure it’s still in the back of his mind.
the idea being, through high-tech chemistry and ingenuity, someone could devise a fly line that would change colors as it goes through various degrees of tension throughout the cast. the tension glasses would allow the caster or viewer to see these colors while the line is dancing in the air and as a bonus, look extremely cool and cause large amounts of envy by having shades no-one else has !

it’s easy to see how a visual back-up confirmation of explanations such as this would greatly benefit casters of all levels.
“With a beginner, one way I like to describe fly casting is to get them to imagine that the head of the fly line out beyond the rod tip is like a piece of bath plug chain of the same length and the typical objective of a normal overhead cast is to get every ball and link of this chain moving in the direction toward intended target area prior to ceasing to apply force with the rod.
If we don’t do this then there is the risk that the last few links/balls at the very far end of the chain were not fully utilized as available weight during the casting process and as one result, the leader and fly of which is attached may not be directed accurately at the target.”

tension glasses lee cummings

as per Lee’s ‘vision’ demonstrated by the photo-shopped image above, bright red would designate highest tension and i guess, bright blue when completely slack. (blue being at the opposite end of the visible spectrum for humans)

anyhow, somewhere right in the middle of downright absolutely f’n brilliant and something pulled from an old pipe-dream sci-fi flick, i fully applaud this kind of thinking and imagination because, even if it never really comes through, (but i hope it does ! this already exists so changing a few things here and there and transposing the idea to a fly line doesn’t seem so exotic) the idea might lead on to another way of achieving the same result, furthering the knowledge of fly casting without resorting to horrendous and boring charts, graphs and equations that have become the norm when discussing casting physics.

“I think if I ever get these glasses it would open up a whole new dimension to fly casting pleasure, actually seeing tension change with the eye would probably stand right by what we have actually come to learn what it is that we feel when we cast.”

for the complete Fly Casting seen through Line Tension Glasses article click this link or the pic. put on your shades and enjoy !

related articles

fly fishing at night

some really good ideas and insights on night fishing here by Lee Cummings.

it’s all good but maybe no. 1 is the most important 😉

Ok, In no particular order…

1 Dont watch stupid horror movies in the weeks leading up to when you might be out night fishing for Sea trout on your own. :)

5 If you smoke, carry multiple lighters and store it all in the highest/driest and most easily accessible pockets.

2 The last song you hear as you lock up your car is something that will probably be in your head all night, make sure that it was not some rubbish off the radio that will just go round and round your brain, tormenting you to distraction whilst you fish!

8 If you do not have to wade at night…… then don’t!

to find the more ‘traditional’ fishing-related tips click HERE, enjoy !

Welding, Adapting, Looping and Single-Hand Shooting Heads

by Lee Cummings

Lee’s one of those rare people you meet once in a while that really thinks outside the box and comes up with brilliant solutions whether it be about casting instruction, fishing or tackle. forever on the hunt to customize and optimize his fishing and casting, he’s been working on short-short shooting head systems for the last few years and here we get a juicy preview on some of these findings and an awesome how-to tip for welding loop systems to these lines.
randomly cutting up some heavier line doesn’t mean it will handle well and turn over properly, and judging by the videos this system does both extremely well. this kind of set up is a real boon for anyone trying to fish in confined spaces, or with heavy wind and i’m thinking that they’ll be a big bonus for night fishing as well and all that whether your using aerial casts or rolls and speys: awesome.

” Short headed lines “around 20 – 25 ft” for single-handed use are not in production and I needed a short head that integrates the sink tip range into its total head length. The Versi leaders and tips I use are between 10 and 15 ft, so ideally I want shooting head bodies that are between 5 and 10 feet long. To enable this, we are going to need a reasonable amount of mass over a short distance to provide the driving impetus, my choice here in this example then, is to utilise the first 9 ft of a factory looped steep back taper off a damaged Scandinavian style shooting head and then weld a loop on the thick blunt end in the following way. “

as a little teaser, here’s Lee casting one of the above mentioned rigs-

click HERE for the full article, loop tutorial  and extra video. enjoy !

Rain Music

here’s my friend Lee Cummings again. on this video he’s casting a shooting head and trying out a new retro-reflective rod coating that enables a better visibility of how a fly rod works through video analysis. a very cool idea indeed with astonishing results.
this was filmed one night in December. as you can see, the passioned and obsessed will stop at nothing !

ps- not sure what happened but the soundtrack is rather special. it reminds me of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) experiences i’ve had… 

Single Handed Spey Casting Session

performed by  Lee Cummings
Lee, simply put is one of the best fly casting instructors there is. he’s definitely a person who thinks outside the box and this is reflected in his approach, studies and development of contemporary casting. having had the great opportunity to witness several of his demos (and even a surprise solo thrash guitar mini-concert in Scotland !), what i’ve taken away each time is a sense of awe and great inspiration. motivation… 
this video is an absolutely stunning display of single-hand spey casts. a reference for anyone interested in these casts and hopefully an eye-opener for all those who think that fly casting is just about slinging a line back and forth overhead.