back to front

and back to paying more attention to what’s behind me at the lake instead of in front.
i guess old habits are hard to break specially when you’re not trying to break them.

Scratchies

as its impossible for me to distinguish which of the nesting Black redstarts (Rougequeue noir in french) at the house is the female or male i just went ahead and gave them both the same name so’s i can’t screw up and get all embarrassed when we say good morning.

sometimes i’l see them carrying a whole bunch of chironomids or sedges in their mouth, this all goes to the little ones. not wanting to disturb anything i haven’t seen them yet but i can hear them make tiny noises. the parents aren’t people shy in the least bit and often come check me out as i go about the terrace but they really-really don’t like having a camera pointed at them. this is the first time i’ve been able to get a decent shot of one of the Scratchies, hopefully some of that shyness will wear off.

apart from a more typical singing songbird chant what alerts me right away to their presence is the very distinguishable tsst-tsst-tsst sound the parents make when they’re in proximity of each other.

these creatures are beautiful, sweet and precious. i hope they hang out here for a while.

whirl-whirl, swirl and twirl

make my head spin till it falls off.

Do seagulls mate for life ?

i hope not ’cause that’s about the most boring thing a creature can do…
anyhow, here’s one of my neighbors, it’s seemingly single, free and mind-numbing beautiful.

let us not forget

that the ordinary can be just as exceptionally beautiful as the extraordinary.

all it takes is taking the time to look a little closer to appreciate what we have.

shystork

White stork parents alternate egg incubating duties so it’s hard to tell if this is a she or he but it was a funny or maybe more aptly, a quirky one. of the thirty or so images i took this is the only one where we can clearly see its eye as it was constantly trying to hide behind one of the tree’s branches.

it didn’t do this when i was looking at it normally but only when behind the camera. as i moved my lens a little to the left, a little to the right, up or down, it would automatically adjust to find some safe place behind another branch or leaf to hide its eye.

funny that such a large bird wouldn’t take into account the rest of its body during the hiding process. in a way i suppose it’s an inverted/twisted ‘out of sight, out of mind’ approach but then that’s just me attempting to apply human reasoning to something that isn’t human and that’s dumb.

whatever its reasons, it was a nice encounter and whilst i sometimes regret carrying the big lens when out fishing, that wasn’t the case today.