Spey Casting- the Dry Fly Spey

we’d already seen this same cast from Christopher Rownes in ‘A spey cast for dry flies‘ in slomo and here’s another demonstration of this very useful cast by an unknown but fine caster on the Kupa river in Croatia and in real time as it’s nice to compare the two. of course, Chris’s video is as always superb but i thought it would be nice to share this other video because it compliments the first and demonstrates the cast in a more confined environment. as a reminder, here’s the cast’s whys and hows for those who aren’t familiar with it:

” ordinarily, spey casts are reserved for sinking flies and nymphs or big deer hair Bomber-style dries that don’t require being constantly dried before being cast out again.
but what about your average trout-size dry fly ? wouldn’t it get drowned by being repeatedly dragged through the water during line repositioning and the subsequent anchoring before rolling out the line again ?
yes it would but there’s a way out and it’s not only fun and efficient but it also lets you present your fly in situations where you couldn’t have before.

from Christopher Rownes, here’s a single-hand rod spey cast version of what both him and Simon Gawesworth call a Dry Fly Snake Roll. the cast is basically the same as Simon’s, but Chris initiates the snake roll part from the right side of the body instead of Simon’s left, combining a Jelly Roll and a Turbo spey (either single or double hauling with a single-hand spey which just like with aerial casting, increases line speed).
as an example of this cast’s usefulness, on the video below let’s imagine that Chris is near the bank and has  trees or rocks behind him and he wants to cast across the river. (the new video below demonstrates this situation clearly)
this cast avoids casting the D-Loop into the trees, enables to dry the fly by false casting left to right out of the presumed holding area of the fish, initiate the Snake Roll and cast the fly out towards it’s target all in one smooth move. a really nice cast to add to your repertoire. “

and a sexy one too…

side note: just to be picky but more of a reminder of things to look out for when learning or practicing spey casts, we’ll notice in this video that the fly leg anchors aren’t in line with the D-Loop/target plane but rather cross-over this plane on the upstream side. ideally, and something to strive for, is to place the anchor just a little bit downstream (reverse that order if on the other side of the water) to separate fly and rod legs just as we would with a standard roll cast.
the solution is easy, perform the Snake-Roll portion slower, start it with the casting arm extended and slowly pull it in towards the body while ‘drawing’ the e.
in other words, take it easy, don’t force it ! 😉