the real problem with ‘wind’ knots.

wind knots‘, that’s the denialists‘ term for casting knots and no, they’re not just made by tailing loops or outrageous casting faults but today’s reminder isn’t about the causes of these knots however embarrassing or annoying they may be but of their consequence.

in other words, these knots kink the mono and greatly reduce the original breaking point of the monofilament material they’re made of.

as we’ll see in Simon Gawesworth’s video, percentages on specific materials vary but generally speaking, that reduction is approximately 50% and that puts us in a very precarious situation if a fish takes our fly because well, we’re left with half the strength threshold we originally counted on.

to make things worse and if i understand correctly,  Instron-type machines used to register elongation and breaking strains do so in a steady, smooth, pulling manner but fish tend to not follow the same procedure…

although i can’t prove this with numbers i’m very certain that sudden tugs and bursts of strength means our knotted lines will be even weaker relatively speaking than those 50 or so %.

double-wind-knot

apart from the denialists, these knots happen to everyone at one point or another and if we want to not get into trouble and leave hooks in fish mouths, there’s only one remedy and that’s to regularly check our leaders and tippets, specially if there’s the slightest doubt or after an obvious yucky cast.

– no knots, carry on as usual.

– find a knot ? is it loose as in the pic ? just undo it and just to be sure, check for kinks.

– did it tighten/seat ? cut it off and rejoin the two pieces.

– if the knot’s too close to the fly or other ‘good’ leader knot, just replace the whole piece and you’ll be able to fish in peace.

Wind Knot D’Ohs, Dos and Don’ts !

in Good Knots we’d seen how wind casting knots are a blessing in disguise but that’s just for the casting part. now, making tailing loops make us feel stupid, frustrated and all the well deserved ha-has from mates don’t help the situation however, and even though tailing loops don’t always result in casting knots, where the real nasty comes in is if we do get them and leave these knots unattended and carry on as if nothing happened.

general knowledge has stated for a long time that an overhand knot in a tippet or leader will reduce that section of mono to approximately one-half percent. in other words, a 10lb tippet instantly turns into a 5lb tippet. that sucks because it completely defeats the purpose of using a 10lb tippet in the first place and to make things even worse, if you think about the mates that saw you make that tailing loop and then see you break off on a fish, well, you know the rest…

the solution is simple and even if its a pain you have to pay for your mistakes; you (and i !) deserve it.
if you notice the ugly TL loop, immediately bring your line back in and check the leader. at this point, its not rare to find an un-seated knot like the ones to the left and all we need to do is undo it carefully, be sure there’s no kinks in it and if all looks good, resume fishing.
if the knot has seated tight that knot either has to be clipped off and rejoined with your preferred mono-to-mono knot or that section of tippet will have to be replaced if the casting knot is close to the fly or next to a mono-to-mono knot higher up the leader.

keep in mind that if you don’t take care of these casting knots, casting karma will come right back and bite you hard…

today’s video from Monsieur Simon Gawesworth removes any doubts about the up-till-now archaic 50% reduction breaking strain statement and the fishing world thanks him for it. enjoy ! (and take it easy when casting… 😉 )

Spey Casting- More on the Snake Roll

by Eoin Fairgrieve

we’d previously seen an introduction on this wonderful all-in-one change-of-direction cast with descriptions by its creator, Simon Gawesworth and beautifully demonstrated by Christopher Rownes and today’s treat compliments the previous instruction perfectly.
always pleasantly explained with simple, concise wordings, Eoin’s as always spot on: it’s all good and well worth paying attention to every single bit.

whether learning for the first time or working on this cast, this is a little goldmine. enjoy !

note- beginners might want to focus on all the same moves but at a slower rate with short to mid belly lines to start off.

new to this or old, be sure to check out the previous Snake Roll article HERE for just about everything there is to know about this cast.
if you have any questions or comments please leave them in the comments box.

Sinking Fly Line Techniques 101

constantly surprised to hear so many anglers consider sinking lines as ‘specialty’ items or even lines they’ve never used, this new video should be able to set things straight for the neophyte who wants to expand their fishing possibilities but, the well-seasoned sinker just might pick up a thing or two as well.

once passed the rather awkward intro… the always-pleasant-to-hear Simon Gawesworth and his Rio cohorts kick in with a whole bunch of  very good info and tips and trick that can make or brake your day at the lake when fishing below the surface. enjoy !

note: not that i mean any disrespect or anything but contrary to some of the explanations, there’s absolutely nothing new or revolutionary about density compensated sinking lines nor non-stretch cores or even the hang marker. as far as i know, it seems like its the first time these markers are factory made and good on them for doing this but its an old trick of the trade stillwater anglers have been making on their own for decades. however, what may be ‘revolutionary’ is producing a combination of these three elements at the factory. good job, i can’t wait to try one out.

Basic SPEY & Two Handed Fly Rod Casting

by Jim Vincent with Simon Gawesworth

a great blast from the not so far past thanks to Fresh Waters Journal.


click the pic for the complete booklet in pdf form and maybe we can turn this into a little challenge for the astute and see if there have been any changes in explanations and descriptions in contemporary spey casting instruction ? enjoy !

Spey Кастинг на русском языке

всегда поражаюсь его литья и инструктаж мастерство, здесь Симон Gawesworth дает нам прекрасный урок из основных и передовых одного литого Spey.

Здесь, Stickman Борис демонстрирует одну Spey брошен в био-механический stickmany пути.

я не мог рекомендовать более его фантастический тройной DVD “Рио Современные Speycasting для thourough введении к этому супер-заводной семьи рыбалка бросает в основном английский.

наслаждайтесь!

a spey cast for dry flies

ordinarily, spey casts are reserved for sinking flies and nymphs or big deer hair Bomber-style dries that don’t require being constantly dried before being cast out again.
but what about your average trout-size dry fly ? wouldn’t it get drowned by being repeatedly dragged through the water during line repositioning and the subsequent anchoring before rolling out the line ? yes it would but there’s a way out and it’s not only fun and efficient but it lets you present your fly in situations where you couldn’t have before.
from Christopher Rownes, here’s a single-hand rod spey cast version of what both him and Simon Gawesworth call a Dry Fly Snake Roll. the cast is basically the same as Simon’s, but Chris initiates the snake roll part from the right side of the body instead of Simon’s left, combining a Jelly Roll and a Turbo spey (either single or double hauling with a single-hand spey which just like with aerial casting, increases line speed).
as an example of this cast’s usefulness, on the video below let’s imagine that Chris is near the bank and has  trees or rocks behind him and he wants to cast across the river.
this cast avoids casting into the trees, dries the fly by false casting left to right out of the presumed holding area of the fish (out of their view), initiate the Snake Roll and cast the fly out towards it’s target all in one smooth move. a really nice cast to add to your repertoire.

Spey Casting- the Snake Roll

devised by Simon Gawesworth in the ’80’s as a quicker, all in one continual motion alternative to the Double-Spey, this one can be of use for any fly angler. not only fun and quick, it’s usefulness extends to any situation whether it be on large salmon rivers or teeny-tiny trout streams, a boat or lake or sea, basically whenever a quick change of direction cast is needed.
here’s an example: i’m on a lake shore fishing to my right and suddenly i see a rise or a cruiser on my left. instead of lifting the line and doing several aerial back and forth false casts to get the line in the fish’s direction, i simply lift the line, initiate the ‘e‘ mentioned below and bang ! it’s out where i want it in about what ? two to three seconds !
cool, huh ?

” Many, many years ago my father and I ran a fly fishing school in Devon, England on the river Torridge. The pool we used to teach Spey casting on was almost ideal. It was wide enough to throw a full line, shallow and gentle enough to wade to the other side and teach casting from both banks and had a nice high bank from which we used to video casters under tuition. The only thing that was wrong with it was that there was not a lot of current. The caster would stand on the left bank (river flowing from right to left) cast a Single Spey across the pool and then have to wait quite sometime for the current to wash the line back to the dangle. This got frustrating and so I used to use two Roll casts to get the line back downstream (there were too many trees lining the pool to do an overhead cast). The first Roll cast was to get the line in the right area and the second to straighten it out. Over the course of time I started to speed the two roll casts up, merging them into one fluid movement and thus became the Snake Roll. “

read Simon’s full article here.

drawing the ‘e‘ shape with the rod tip to pull in the line and set up the D-loop. be sure to keep the rod tip in plane as much as possible on the imaginary wall.

in the video below we see Christopher Rownes‘ absolutely gorgeous  performance of the Snake Roll cast with a single hand rod. trés suave !

let’s always keep in mind that contrary to what many people perceive them to be, Spey casts are casts that can be done regardless of equipment, with both single and double handed rods. they are not a designation of how many hands are holding the rod or a type of rod.
in it’s simplest form, we’ll define spey casts as ‘change of direction casts’: a repositioning of the fly line resulting in the anchor and D-loop in line with the target followed by a roll cast.
the Snake Roll is one of the alternatives in doing this all in one continuous, graceful and highly effective motion.
it’s an easy and quick cast to learn and a definite bonus to your casting repertoire, give it a try !