a Strung-Out and Wired Olive Spider

ok, there’s nothing strung-out about this spider pattern but i just like the way it sounds…

on to today’s nifty bug tutorial by Hans Weilenmann; a quick look at Mike Harding’s A Guide to North Country Flies and How to Fish Them (a reference book on this style of fly i highly recommend)  a guide to north country fliesreminds us that apart from a few style-deviant patterns, NCF’s are indeed wet flies but they’re generally unweighted and are designed to fish dead-drifted on, in or slightly below the surface but traditions are just like rules and rules and traditions are meant to be broken, bent, corrupted and distorted, at least in a fly-fishy sort of way so, just as Harding’s Brassie Boa, Brassie Midge, Woodcock and Red Brassie and Copper Wire Dun (that one’s really yummy) that also have a wired body instead of the traditional waxed or unwaxed thread bodies, Hans’ version takes the same route by adding a little tiny bit of weight to what’s normally a pretty weightless fly. this extra weight shouldn’t lead you to believe these variants will sink the flies to the riverbed because they don’t, specially if there’s anything more than a slow current. on the other hand, they will go just underneath the surface currents quite easily and also help to turn over a team of two or three flies when the wired spider is tied on as point fly. of maybe more importance, at least in my eyes, the wired bodies will automatically add a little bit of flashiness, something that will be of great use to us when the fish are in a flashy mood or when getting their attention when they’re in sleepy mode.

as always, Hans gives good tutorial and this one’s no exception and now its time for him to take over. enjoy !

Fly Tying videos- Stew’s Glassy Spider

by Hans Weilenmann

a direct descendant of Stewart’s Black Spider, Hans’ variant will be it’s perfect companion for when fish aren’t interested in fashionable black and want something less Gothy yet still yummy.
hard to find simpler to tie, don’t hesitate to also make up a few in various brown or olive tones and as always in different sizes. enjoy !

just in time- the Octobre Cinnamon Caddis Wet

another great tying tutorial from Tim Flagler at Tightlinevideo

these little beauties are all about these days and apart from admiring their cuteness, as trout fishers one of the better things we can do is try to use that cuteness to try to entice some fish before winter sets in.
Tim’s video shows how to construct a very lively and durable wet imitation to be fished as all wets, upstream, across or on the swing. fish it on its own or as a dropper from a nymph or dry. enjoy, and happy catches !

The Midnight Stalker

although the fly’s name might conjure up spooky visions of things that go more-than bump in the night, today’s new tying tutorial from Hans Weilenmann isn’t all that scary but instead a really nice wet fly more than worthy of consideration.

what makes it really nice ? well, its got a cool name to start with and then its black, and then it’s simple to tie, and it’s on a barbless grub hook, and that it has just the right proportions, and that it’ll look extremely buggy when wet, and then all of that tells me that this is not only a good one but a really good one and a really good one all year long for several species. if for some reason black doesn’t do it for you go ahead and change the colour scheme. you’ll probably catch less fish but then fishing isn’t all about catching fish, from what i hear… 

and if you’re feeling nostalgic of past Halloween Raves you could always listen to these appropriatly-titled sounds while wrapping the black wire body. enjoy !

a wet history

by Davie Wotton

here’s some absolutely wonderful insights, invaluable material information and groovy historical aspects for all those desiring to increase their knowledge of both traditional and contemporary wet flies by probably the most knowledgeable and talented person in the fly tying world. ’nuff said, enjoy !