The Midnight Stalker

although the fly’s name might conjure up spooky visions of things that go more-than bump in the night, today’s new tying tutorial from Hans Weilenmann isn’t all that scary but instead a really nice wet fly more than worthy of consideration.

what makes it really nice ? well, its got a cool name to start with and then its black, and then it’s simple to tie, and it’s on a barbless grub hook, and that it has just the right proportions, and that it’ll look extremely buggy when wet, and then all of that tells me that this is not only a good one but a really good one and a really good one all year long for several species. if for some reason black doesn’t do it for you go ahead and change the colour scheme. you’ll probably catch less fish but then fishing isn’t all about catching fish, from what i hear… 

and if you’re feeling nostalgic of past Halloween Raves you could always listen to these appropriatly-titled sounds while wrapping the black wire body. enjoy !

“The only advice it is necessary to give the angler… is to avoid any approach to foppery, as trout have the most thorough contempt for a fop…”

W.C. Stewart

so, in W.C.’s honor, here’s a little something i just Fopped up.
the 'Fop' spider

the Tummel fly, nudity and the Highlander

“Of all the original Scottish fly-designs, that of the old Tummel fly must be considered the most individual.  In no other part of Scotland is the dressing of a trout fly so severely curtailed in every respect.  It has been said that the Highlander liked two things naked – his whisky and his women – but the old Tummel fishers extended this preference to their trout flies, which in marked contrast to the rough-dressed flies commonly used for trout fishing in most Highland rivers, all are but naked also. Compared with the true Tummel fly, the daintiest modern nymphal representation is heavily dressed and bulky in appearance.

   The austerity of the dressing of the Tummel fly in itself constitutes the most conclusive refutation of a widely-held assumption that our forefathers could not dress the most dainty and masterly trout flies when they so desired or found it to be necessary.” 

straight from the land of fierce, gorgeous women and men in kilts, here’s a real gem from the now and past found on Donald Nicolson’s Historical Wet Fly & Spider Pattern Site. do yourself the favor of browsing through Donald’s site for an amazing wealth of old-fashioned yet timeless fishy stuff. enjoy !