Fly Tying- All about Cones heads, Discs and Beads

rarely do we get such in-depth research on fly tying materials such as what Martin Joergensen has recently put together for us to learn from and help decide which product will be best suited for our needs.

“A lot of flies – salmon tube flies in particular – use different discs or cones, and the market is full of them. Here’s an overview of some of the many types.” calling this an overview is really an understatement. with all the research of different types of cones and discs, their origins, history and detailed effects on the finished fly, i would consider this more of a thesis on the subject…
cone types M. Joergensen
“Cone heads and discs are the rage on salmon flies. Basically all tube flies tied for salmon fishing feature some kind of cone or disc these days. On hooks it’s much more uncommon to see cones or discs – for reasons which may become obvious later” and for all that obviousness and a whole lot more, be sure to click either image to access Martin’s fantabulous article. enjoy !
Disc types M. Joergensen

Fly Tying- a Perfect Embryo

here’s a super-nifty tying trick from Gilbert Rowley

i’m neither pro nor con when it comes to egg patterns. as far as today’s tutorial goes, i’ll even completely disassociate from the fact that its an egg imitation and focus in on the rather ingenious idea of covering up a bead or beads whilst creating a body shape.
eggs are pretty much round but one of the beauties of using UV resins is it can be built-up and shaped at will; more on one side, less on the other. UV resin can be cured in successive steps and doesn’t need to be applied in one go. with that in mind we can easily recreate shapes like these or any others we can think of while still adding a fair amount of weight to the fly.
tungsten body shapes

and that’s where Gilbert’s tutorial really shines, at least in my eyes: an inspiration on simple, inexpensive, modular, creative use of weight and fly shape. enjoy !

Fly Tying- April tells us all about her Rhea

first, here’s the beast.
3 Rheas well, three of them…

as for the telling all about part, here’s April Volkey giving what’s in my mind/experience the finest and most thought-out fly tying material how-to-use demonstration i’ve ever seen.
it’s not about constructing a specific pattern but about exploring the endless possibilities and hands-on practical aspects of this long, durable and very lively fibre and incorporating it to all manner of salmon, steelhead flies or basically any kind of wet fly or streamer whether it be for fresh or saltwater. be sure to watch it in HD, enjoy !

 

as for the beast itself, click on the threesome for more info.

Scott’s Squidro

ok, he’s pushing sales but if we overlook that we’ll find lots of nice, interesting ideas on streamer design and construction in this video by Scott Howell via LeLandFly

“A cousin to the now-famous intruder fly, the Squidro features rubber legs instead of ostrich herl, a modification that accounts for its unrivaled durability and downright irresistible action in the water. With a slim profile, the Squidro sinks to swinging depth in a hurry, lengthening your swing to increase your chances of hooking up with deep-running fish.”

geared towards Steelhead, in different colour schemes and in different sizes i can’t imagine them not being equally effective on larger river browns and rainbows and even salmon. (and largemouth bass, and zanders, and pike and maybe salty fish and, and, and… )

here Scott ties a black and blue version. be warned, the video’s 28 minutes long. who knows, this might be fly fishing history’s longest-to-tie fishing fly ever !

and to push this fly to the ultimate Geekdome Fly-Hall of Fame, here’s ‘Anatomy of a Squidro‘ for the techies. enjoy (and get Squidy) !

Tying up the Nagli

a Spey-style variant of the classic Islandic Nagli Atlantic salmon fly by Davie McPhail.

outside of yet another fantabulous tying tutorial with Davie’s impeccable techniques and explanations, those of us that don’t get the opportunity to chase Atlantic salmon very often might be inspired by this pattern’s basic design to adapt it to river trout use, particularly rainbows. tied as is, i can’t help but think this one would be a doozy on steelhead as well. enjoy !

getting down

from experience i tend to believe or rather, trust that drabber, more subdued natural-toned flies whether imitative or attractive catch more fish but that’s not always the case so it’s always worth having at least a few flash and bling flies hidden in the back of the box for when the ‘go-to’s’ aren’t getting the attention of our slimy friends.
in other words, these can make the difference between a trip that concluded with fish landed and a blank day.

in what’s at least in my eyes, a crossover of a Blob and fish egg pattern, this gaudy bit looks just the thing to wake up and hopefully raise an appetite or aggressive strike response from any trout-type fish within a 500 meter radius whether in flowing or stillwater pulled with varying speed retrieves. not bad for a fly that takes less than two minutes to put together. 
probably as a conditioned analysis, i can see this fly being equally effective in various or mixed tones of olive, brown or even black furnishings. hopefully today’s offering from The Rogue Fly will offend a few dry fly purists and inspire the rest to maybe tie something a little different to the end of their leader. enjoy !