Fly Tying and Slurping and Burping

the Slurp and Burp Worm: its as if a mouse, a beaver and a wild and wooley, rattling hillbilly mind and body-melded themselves to a hook. what’s not to like ?

more than just a nifty bass and whatever other species that likes hybrid foods fly, this is one the most well explained tying tutorials i’ve seen in a long while. Pat Cohen goes the extra mile and this is well worth setting aside seven and a half minutes to observe. geez, this is the first fly i’ve ever seen that has a beaver tail, i love it ! enjoy !

 

Fly Tying- a Looooong Mouse

by Andreas Andersson via KanalGratis.Se

deerhairmouseif you’re the fast-food type that needs quick tutorials and quick ties you might want to look away. on the other hand, if you want what’s very probably the most awesomest deer hair mouse tutorial, hang on.

43 minutes long, you’ll need patience, time and about fourteen deer hair hides to make one of these beasts but its such a great video so full of tying tips and tricks and that all makes it more than worth the time. enjoy !

Fly Tying- More than an Egg

we’ve taken the egg tying route before with the standard egg yarn design- the Good side of Clowns and a pretty darn realistic, resin-based- a Perfect Embryo.
most tiers would leave it at that and consider their eggy needs complete but this recent video by Matthew Pate takes the egg yarn technique to another level and its brilliant and super-easy.

the concept here was to make a softer egg and the technique is very-very similar to how we would use deer hair, both in its application and consequent trimming to shape. Matthew’s tutorial shows us not only a really nifty way to make an egg imitation but what i’m also and maybe mostly seeing is a really-really cool way to make streamer heads, bodies or other fly shapes that can be trimmed to any form and will shed water easily making casting a piece of eggy cake.

the creative tier might have already figured out that by alternating different coloured bundles of egg yarn we’ll get a barred-bodied effect. other options might be including flashy synthetics here and there and, and, and, it seems like using the same technique can lead to myriad results: the egg yarn’s the limit.
once again, brilliant stuff. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Oh Wanda !

i’ve always liked this name. it sounds primal, prehistoric, powerful and psexy.

Wanda White

Wanda (/ˈwɒndə/ won-də; Polish pronunciation: [ˈvanda])

is a female given name of Polish origin. It probably derives from the tribal name of the Wends. The name has long been popular in Poland where the legend of Princess Wanda has been circulating since at least the 12th century. In 1947 Wanda was cited as the second most popular name, after Mary, for Polish girls, and the most popular from Polish secular history. The name is popularly interpreted as meaning “wanderer.”

this hot-off-the-vise streamer pattern by Kris Keller via FlyFishingTheOzarks  looks like it’ll be super-steamy wanderer for any fish that wants a nice seductive mouthful.

Wanda Olive:White

as Kris says: “A very cool little single-hook pattern. In the right color-combo and size, I believe this fly could catch every species of game fish in the world.” and i don’t doubt that for a second and i’m sure you won’t either after seeing the way it swims.

simple to make and rather inexpensive (as far as modern streamers go), tie them as in the tutorial or like the featured variants and as always smaller or bigger to suit your particular needs. enjoy!

Demon Death Ghoul Streamer

what the heck… i don’t usually go for all this halloween goofiness, flies with multiple hooks and even less whatever type of music this might be considered to be but ! this just-out streamer tying tutorial by Michał Zapał of Live 4 Fly Fishing in Poland really stands out from the crowd. in fact it just might be a first in the genre and as such is much welcomed. let’s just consider it as a loud breath of fresh air. congrats Michal, we’re hoping to see more. lots more.

be sure to check out his page on Facebook for a large variety of very nicely tied flies but in the meantime, sit back, crank up the volume and enjoy !

ps- should you really want to go all-out with this Evil Death Ghoul stuff i couldn’t think of a better match to cast this Evil fly than the Stickman Rods Evil Black T8 9′ 8wt 😉

Fly Fishing Tips and Tricks- Weight shift/Attitude adjustment

Davy Wotton needs no introduction. for me, he’s one of those few people that when he speaks and shares his wisdom, i’m all ears because those words are the fruit of many, many years of experience and always lead to not only learning something new but also a new mental approach to that particular subject and today’s ‘Attitude Adjustment’ does just that.
it’s not just a super-easy way to very quickly get our flies at the right depth but also gets us thinking about how flies move and how we can alter those moments during the drift or retrieve.

here’s just a few text tidbits to wet your appetite:

“There is no doubt that bead headed fly patterns have a place but not always. That said by a simple process the fly fisher can for the same fly pattern used have many options in so far as altering how that fly will fish and by what attitude or movement it can be presented be that dead drift or with animated movement such as fishing wet fly, soft hackles and streamers.”

Davy Wotton 'Attitude Adjustment'
“So here is the deal. l carry with me a box which contains tungsten beads of different sizes and colors, size of bead is of course related to the weight. Many of my fly patterns are not adorned with a bead head included on the hook shank.
l now have many options to change the fly by the addition of bead size and color, or number of beads used, more to the point by the addition of the bead to the tippet or leader above the hook eye it will cause the fly to fish hook up.”

click the pic to access Davy’s complete article. enjoy !
and HERE for previous articles on Davy’s wisdom posted here on TLC

you Dumb Bunny !!!

what’s better than a bunny streamer ?  a Dumb Bunny streamer !

besides being a bit different, what makes the DB maybe better than most ? this great new pattern from Tim Flagler has some interesting features, let’s take a look at them:
– first of all, it’s a bunny fly and bunny flies rule.
– the fly rides point up and i like streamers that ride point up.
– there’s only two materials, bunny strips and a pair of dumb bell eyes.
– its construction is super-simple. beginner simple.
– it looks really good, specially when wet and swimming. (see vid)
– wrapping the body strip around the shank adds just enough bulk to give the pattern’s profile a nice differentiation between body and tail.
– trimming the body’s underfur not only helps to recreated the wedged underbelly shape most baitfish have but also helps the fly to track straight.  as an aside, a thought that instantly came to mind was one could also wrap lead wire around the hook shank prior to wrapping the bunny strip to add more weight for faster/deeper waters and also to accentuate the keel effect.
– as another aside, i don’t really see the point in painting the dumb bell eyes as they’re already pretty close as they are to the basic black shape of fish eyes but maybe that’s just me being a lazy sod…

lots of good points, aye ? enjoy !

Fly Tying- April tells us all about her Rhea

first, here’s the beast.
3 Rheas well, three of them…

as for the telling all about part, here’s April Volkey giving what’s in my mind/experience the finest and most thought-out fly tying material how-to-use demonstration i’ve ever seen.
it’s not about constructing a specific pattern but about exploring the endless possibilities and hands-on practical aspects of this long, durable and very lively fibre and incorporating it to all manner of salmon, steelhead flies or basically any kind of wet fly or streamer whether it be for fresh or saltwater. be sure to watch it in HD, enjoy !

 

as for the beast itself, click on the threesome for more info.

James Brown and Gandalf

a tasty funky streamer tying tutorial by Norbert Renaud

mix in equal parts and you’ll end up with not only one of the cutest streamers there is and if that weren’t enough,  you’ll probably start gyrating your hips while tying it. (gyrating’s good. in fact it’s the secret of all great fly tiers)

[vimeo 123338293 w=1000]

ps- be sure to tie a few extra and cut off the hook and give them to your kids and cats as toys.  enjoy !

River Streamer Fishing 101

excellent article here from Marshall Cutchin at MidCurrent with tons of very good tips from very good anglers for the river angler wanting to include streamer fishing to their bag of tricks.

streamer 101 MidCurrenta short extract from Kelly Galloup-
“First remember that line control is everything in all fly fishing and especially with streamers. Start close, streamer fishing is not hucking a fly as far as you can and hoping for a fish. You have to learn to control your fly and move the fly with your rod. So start close, say thirty feet max and then watch your fly. You should be moving your fly in small 6 inch movements with slight pauses between each six inch pulse. Cast across stream and always have a tight line. Don’t worry about getting the fly deep, most fish are less than 3 feet of water, if the fly is moving properly the fish will come and get it. Cast across stream and always keep the fly moving back across stream, do not allow the fly to swing tail first down stream. In other words this is not a wet fly swing with a bigger fly, you look for likely hold areas and then stalk and cast that area keeping the moving across the current. Make the fish come and get the fly by its erratic movements.”

click the back of the happy oarsman’s head for the complete article. enjoy !

Belly Scratcha !

just looking at these two pics should dispense the need for any further commentary…

Belly Scratcher Minnow FlyFishFood

we’ve all seen a lot of awesome streamer patterns but in my opinion, if ever there was a ‘good as good gets’ little fish imitation with all the right elements then i haven’t seen it yet. as we clearly see on the top image, beads strung on a wire well away from the hook shank will force the fly to ride hook-point up, help to not snag so much on the river bed or debris and track straight. the weight is still in the front part of the pattern but the ballast’s placement provides a more horizontal swim than dumbbell eyes can give. specifically built for rivers on a floating line, i can see the basic design working anywhere. as noted in the vid, simply add more or less beads depending on your specific depth and current speed needs or if you want to fish them with sinking lines.

baby belly scratcher FFF

here’s the tying tutorial but be sure to click either pic to access the complete article on yet another fantastic tutorial from the bearded bros at FlyFishFood. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Mix dubbing easily

a nifty, super-easy to understand tutorial from my buddy and über fly tier Holger Lachmann.

after re-reading Denis Shaw’s fantabulous A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial i noticed that even though the flea comb is shown and used for other purposes, it isn’t used for mixing different types or different shades of material so Holger’s video fills this little gap perfectly. while there are several very good alternatives when mixing larger batches of dubbing, the standard for smaller amounts is simply using our fingers to pull, separate and regroup the materials.
this of course works very well but some materials, notably synthetics that tend to intertwine more than naturals make this task a little more difficult and that’s where the flea comb shines.

a lot of tiers simply buy pre-mixed blends that are readily available and that’s more than fine but in a way, they’re missing out on the possibility of customising the final result’s appearance and in the long run, perhaps its effectiveness in fooling the fish. another aspect of interest when mixing your own is the possibilities are endless. many, many ‘household’ or rather, not-out-of-a-fly shop things can be used to make dubbing, further enhancing creativity which is in my opinion a very big bonus to our craft because its another area where we can put in our own little personal touch while greatly reducing costs.
its all good. enjoy !

thoughts on fly tying and art

Art Led Me to Fly Fishing by Cheech at Fly Fish Food

gotta love the colder months. people are inspired enough to take the time to dish out some real gems and here’s yet another.

“We didn’t have guns to shoot, ATVs to ride, or animals to feed. I really was fueled by sports, mainly soccer, through my younger years but I always had access and drive to create art. In about 5th grade I realized that I couldn’t draw anything that was realistic, so I’d draw and create caricatures and abstract stuff (like the flyfishfood logo) that would freak out my teachers. I guess the sculpture of a figure in a hooded robe with his mouth sewn shut was the kicker for her… ”
Art Mascots Cheech FlyFishFood

and it gets groovier and groovier from thereon.

click the moustache for the whole bit and be sure to dig through the Fly Fish Food site for tons of awesome reggae-inspired flies. enjoy !

Tuesday’s ShoutOut- the UKFlyDressing forum

UKFlyDressing or UKFD, has been since i signed up six years ago my favorite fly tying forum among the crowd.
always friendly, unpretentious and with a very rich assortment of fly patterns, step-by-steps, tying tips and you name it goodies to keep the fly tier of all levels learning, creative and more efficient.
the highly read here on TLC, Dennis Shaw’s fantabulous A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial is just one of the gems we’ll find on UKFD, i’ve included another lovely below this introduction.

the forum has been a little slow lately. apart from wanting to share a great source for my readers i’m also hoping that at least a few of you will like what you see and feel inclined to join up yourselves and share your ties and knowledge with the rest of the community and keep it alive and thriving for years to come. just in case: don’t be put off by the UK bit, its an international community making it rich and diversified. dig into the various sections deeply, you’ll find more than a few treasures.

you’ll find the main page HERE  but check out this great thread control/twist tutorial first. enjoy !


Don’t get in a Twist by Tango

The majority of threads have a clockwise twist. For a right handed tyer when you wrap the thread around the hook you put another full twist in for every turn taken around the shank. This tightens or cords the thread even more. You must learn to use this to your advantage i.e. when tying in materials/whip finishing/making a rib from thread.

No twist in thread
spin1

Wrapped to bend and a twist in there, not much but it affects the behaviour of the thread.
spin2
If you leave the twist in and try and take a soft turn over the materials the thread will want to lie to the right, this makes it difficult to get the thread where you want it.
spin3
Spin the bobbin anticlockwise and it takes the twist out, this make the thread lie straight and it goes where you want it to.
spin4
You can also spin the bobbin more to put an anticlockwise twist in the thread, this makes the thread lie to the left, you can use this to make the soft loop over your fingers and slide the thread down to the tie in point.
spin7

Why bother?
If you leave the twist in there and whip finish the thread bunches and knots, this usually results in the thread snapping and the whip finish coming undone.

It really does make it easier to tie in materials.

When to take the twist out?
Before tying in materials, whip finishing, splitting thread for dubbing and when you want the thread to lay flat – this reduces bulk.

Exceptions?
Pearsall’s silk has an anticlockwise twist, to split this thread you need to spin the bobbin clockwise. There may be more.

When to put twist in?
When you “post” upright wings it will take fewer wraps than untwisted thread.
When making a rib from thread, you won’t see a flat wrap.

For a left handed tyer it does the opposite, it takes the twist out of the thread, with some threads this can weaken it.

There is also two types of thread, BONDED and UNBONDED, bonded thread (i.e. Uni-Thread) will not lay flat but still suffers from the effects of twist. Also bonded thread will not split so you cannot use it for split thread dubbing technique, MP Magic tool techniques etc.

 

Lachmann’s Stickleback

here’s one of those baitfish imitations that brings up the questions: how could i top this and why would i need anything else ?

to be honest, apart from tweaking it here and there by changing its size and colour schemes to match local baitfish, with less or more lead wraps or even weighted with dumbbell eyes maybe for a pronounced jigging action, i don’t think i could and this fly sums up what a baitfish imitation should be so, can’t and no.

be sure to check out Holger Lachmann’s site The One Fly for lots more in the yummy fly department. enjoy !

Connor’s Jerk

by Connor Jones via Gink & Gasoline 

a simple to tie, great profiled, minimally explained (big bonus points !), all-purpose baitfish imitation that’s cute and sexy, easy to cast because it won’t hold water for long, wiggles and jiggles the way a baitfish imitation should and all that to a nice soundtrack by Adrian Belew. what more could we want ?
tie them smaller, bigger, maybe weighted with lead wire wraps if it needs to get down a little faster and in different colour combos to suit your local needs, baitfish and target species. enjoy !

Jack’s Sparrow

Jack as in Gartside and Sparrow as in this lovely universal, multi-purpose, no frill or bling streamer expertly tied by Tim Flagler.

in a contemporary world where most flies seem to look more like decorated christmas trees than anything else, this classic is a nice reminder that drab is good and often gooder than bling.
its not like i have any problems with blingy flies: if they work, they work and that’s a great thing. on the other hand, in the vast majority of areas i fish in Europe, drab, or rather ‘natural-coloured’ flies outfish bling maybe at an eighty or more percent ratio.
concretely, this means that the blings are at the back of the box, in much lower numbers and are used as a last resort or when waters are very murky. (but even then, black flies always seem to get more attention… )
of course, this is a regional thing and even if you live in a bling part of the world, having a few of these in different sizes stashed away might just save the day when your fish aren’t in a psychedelic mood.

as always and whatever he’s tying, Tim’s tutorials are chock full of obvious and not so obvious tying tricks that also transfer to a myriad of other fly patterns making us better tiers whatever style of fly we tie. as such i’d recommend paying attention to all the finer details.  enjoy !

the Definitive Clouser

as just about every single tying video by Tim Flagler, today’s infamous Clouser Minnow tutorial is one to bookmark and keep as a reference.
extreeeemely well detailed with special focus points to help us construct a strong, effective and fish-attracting fly. this is a real gem, enjoy !

Fly Tying- How to apply dubbing

clear, concise with all the finer details, Hans Stephenson‘s basic dubbing application tutorial is primarily geared towards the beginners in fly tying but a lot of ‘seasoned veterans’ might just pick up a thing or two as well.
although the dubbing material used in the vid seems to be of the ‘super-easy to apply’ type, note that this method will tame the more difficult materials such as adult seal fur, just to name a what-can-be toughy. enjoy !

for the most complete of all completest dubbing tutorials be sure to check out previously posted Fly Tying: A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial by Dennis Shaw whom i’d like to take the occasion to thank again for sharing such an amazing work with us.

White Trash and a Puss

two great new vids from the guys at Gink&Gasoline

first up and another fine example of “one of those bread and butter, no real need to stray from the basic design fly/streamers”, Garner Reid’s White Trash has everything a baitfish imitation should have.
proportions, profile, a combined mix of opaque and translucency and of course the necessary (imo) sexy-seductive action of the bunny fur strip to make it come alive even when not retrieved or affected by current. as a bonus the dumbbell eyes also gives it an up and down jigging action. a fine variant leading to a different swimming action would be to not add the dumbbell and glue on plastic eyes instead.

tie them in different sizes and colours to match your local baitfish and you can’t go wrong. simples.

and now for a trippy puss. enjoy !

be sure to regularly check out the G&G blog. it’s one of the best out there.

T-Bird’s Nail-Nymph !

by Steve Dally at The Ozark Fly Fisher Journal

as a follow up to yesterday’s Davy Knot post, seeing that Teresa ‘T-Bird’ Van Winkle and Davy Wotton are an item, here’s an interesting video on a very successful nymph pattern.
it’s not like replacing standard feather fibres with much-more moving marabou is something new but then its not all that common either and well worth adding a couple of these variants when tying a series of nymphs.
this extra tail movement can be the deciding factor at times and has come in more-than-handy throughout the years for me.
in short, this slight transformation of the tail brings the same nymph pattern somewhere between the ‘traditional’ nymph and a swimming micro streamer, giving the fish in turn another enticing tidbit to wet their appetites. give them a try.

Scott’s Squidro

ok, he’s pushing sales but if we overlook that we’ll find lots of nice, interesting ideas on streamer design and construction in this video by Scott Howell via LeLandFly

“A cousin to the now-famous intruder fly, the Squidro features rubber legs instead of ostrich herl, a modification that accounts for its unrivaled durability and downright irresistible action in the water. With a slim profile, the Squidro sinks to swinging depth in a hurry, lengthening your swing to increase your chances of hooking up with deep-running fish.”

geared towards Steelhead, in different colour schemes and in different sizes i can’t imagine them not being equally effective on larger river browns and rainbows and even salmon. (and largemouth bass, and zanders, and pike and maybe salty fish and, and, and… )

here Scott ties a black and blue version. be warned, the video’s 28 minutes long. who knows, this might be fly fishing history’s longest-to-tie fishing fly ever !

and to push this fly to the ultimate Geekdome Fly-Hall of Fame, here’s ‘Anatomy of a Squidro‘ for the techies. enjoy (and get Squidy) !

brainwashem’ young- Connor

not the youngest of the brainwashem’ young series, this young man for sure isn’t at his beginnings with this great display of craftsmanship.
here’s a Golden Retriever* to start off your week. enjoy !

* after a little research, the standard Golden Retriever seems to be just another variant of the Wooly Bugger. good on Connor for going the extra mile and turning it into something more unique and baitfish-like.