“In the lexicon of the fly-fishermen, the words rise and hooked connote the successful and desirable climax; landing a fish is purely anticlimax.”

~by Vincent C. Marinaro-1950

left-hand tenkara 1 TLC 25-5-13

which is a good thing because while i was doing some left-handed Tenkara shenanigans at Lake Trouto (and for some reason trying to get this on film) all three of these fish came off…

left-hand Tenkara 2 TLC 25-5-13 left-hand Tenkara 3 TLC 25-5-13

strike-fight-land

one of the more interesting activities of the Sexyloops Gatherings is the demos we give to the group. most participants are casting instructors, guides, and fervent fishers of all levels and fishing specialities but more importantly, friends. this last part means we can get and give honest constructive feedback on each others ideas and demonstrations. it’s not just the usual clap, thank you and walk away.
the learning curve goes way high in these situations, specially after a while of consideration and testing and adapting and incorporating or not what has been learned to our own ways.
this year i did two demos, one on striking, fighting and landing fish using the rod’s potential to its maximum while maintaining as close-to-possible perfect tension on the fish and another on casting Tenkara rods.

strike-fight-land demo SL Gathering 2013
photo: Al Pyke

the SF&L demo has been part of all my courses for the last year and the Tenkara was mostly to share this ‘newish’ style of equipment to several people who hadn’t had the chance to either see or try one out. it was an extremely easy demo because outside of exploring a different dimension of fly fishing there’s absolutely nothing to learn casting-wise because it’s just another fly rod. most where blown away however by seeing how easy it is to have extremely nice drifts with these rods in fast waters.
speaking of waters, i’ve been close to Glasgow for the last few days where the waters mostly come from above, it’s not so warm and i only managed three salmon yesterday on river Tay but those salmon happened to be babies that fit in my hand.

related articles

does tenkara fishing affect a fish’s vision ?

in yet another blundering attempt in showing us how the tenkara style is so unique here’s a funny chart that makes one wonder if this method doesn’t affect the brain and how it works.
– once again, what does it teach us and what have we learned ? nothing.
– does a fish always come to the fly from the same angle and has it anything to do with tackle ? surely not.
– angler A has a much shorter rod than angler D. does this mean we would have to change rod, line and leader just to fish a little bit further back that angler A ?
that’s not a very enticing perspective for the angler wanting to try this method, is it ?

as a sort of conclusion and what’s nice, is the traditional angler (or ‘western style’ as they call it) that wants to give this simplistic method a go has nothing to worry about. they can keep on casting, approaching fish and catching them and it won’t affect our slimy friend’s vision at all.

fish vision & tenkara

just to set things straight, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this method of fishing, in fact i consider it really cool.
the born-again wheel-reinventing bozos on the other hand…

Vermont Hand Crafted Tenkara Rods

by Quill Gordon

you gotta admit, good ‘ole American Inginuity always pulls through and here’s a fine example.

Tenkara is an old Japanese method of fishing, conceived as a way to yank fish from small streams. Generating a lot of interest lately, its American adherents are practically swooning. It turns out that my friend Eugene has been using similar methods for years and his desire to simplify the gentle art of angling (see “… teach a man to fish …”) has naturally led him to Tenkara. Feeling uniquely qualified, he is anxious to share his expertise. He’s also fairly sure he can make a buck or two doing it.”

“Your Vermont Hand Crafted Tenkara rod will arrive in its travel-ready state. Simply unwind the line and give the rod a shake.” 

read more on these breakthrough rods here and be sure to check out Quill Gordon’s blog The View from Fish in a Barrel Pond for lots of good thoughts mixed in with Vermont humor. (yes, Vermont humor)