Fly Casting- The next Level ?

as the Advanced Fly Casting Demonstration title alludes to, is this advanced casting or not ? well, yes and no. let’s start with the no.

the no-casters will be quick to point out that all this fiddly-fancy rod waving is completely unnecessary; its just ‘trick casting’ to impress the peanut gallery which would probably scare off fish anyhow.
fine. assuming that the angler has decent control of their rod/line/leader/fly combo and can place the fly to the intended target with reasonable regularity, then that’s probably good enough for them. after all, a good chocolate cake doesn’t really need a scoop of ice cream or sauce to make the cake any better does it ?

well, i’m the kind that likes good ice cream and good sauce on good chocolate cake. they enhance the experience, offer a variety of tastes with the overall result of having a more complete dessert. ditto for fly casting.
now, i know very well that all this extra fiddly-fancy rod waving in itself isn’t going to lead to any more landed fish and to be honest, i’ll refrain from doing all this excessive stuff when actually fishing but !, its all going to make me a more efficient caster if i know how to do it at practice time plus, its a lot of fun and fun makes casting sessions a lot more productive than doing simple, basic movements over and over again.
but why ? casting as Klaus displays in the video needs a highly developed sense of spacial and temporal awareness and the ability to act/move very precisely on several planes in sequence with different rhythms and speeds all the while controlling varying degrees of slack in the line. in real-world situations, these capabilities allow the caster to improvise in real time, a little plus considering all the continually changing variables that happen when we fish.
this is hard-core multi-dimensional traverse wave casting and one that needs visualisation before and during the casts to not mess up ! very much akin to Zen-like activities, in a sense, movement needs to happen before thought or maybe more precisely, movements need to happen based on pre-visualisation and not a more ‘traditional’ step-by-step as-it-happens method. i don’t know if that makes sense but i can’t find a better way to describe it with words.

so, is this Advanced Fly Casting ? you bet ! but when/if acquired, we can consider it a hidden skill set that pops up when needed most, when situations get tricky and we still want to stay in the game while pleasing one’s self and not the peanut gallery. whether we chose or not to get to this level is a personal choice and most definitely non-necessary. at worst its eye candy but its a lovely candy that won’t make us fat like the ice cream, sauce and cake… enjoy !

Pretty casting.

not sure how else to describe Christopher Rowne‘s style but it sure fits the bill. as casting geeks we could go on and analyse this and that but for today ’nuff said, this is eye candy and it’s very tasty. enjoy !

as a side note, i’m really happy to see mini-drones used for filming casting sequences as it’s giving us perspectives that are otherwise quite difficult to achieve.

a loop too tight

too often touted as the ‘nec plus ultra’ in fly casting, the ultra-tight loop can sometimes have its disadvantages as seen in Niklas Erikson’s video below. the image isn’t of best quality but we can clearly see the arrow-point loop-face consecutively collapse and reform seven times by the time the line has fully turned over. (ok, it doesn’t turn over very well but hey, this is championship-level distance casting… :mrgreen: )
kidding aside, this is a fascinating example of loop propagation study. of special interest as well is watching the caster’s movements throughout the delivery stroke. that’s about as ‘Oooomph‘ as Oooomph gets.
be sure to watch it in full screen and HD. enjoy !

want a tight loop ?

well, here you go !
Tom Syversen ‘SuperRattus‘, is always up there with the best (but quite discreetly) in showing us causes and effects in fly casting. demonstrating here what might be the smallest  loop possible.
at the beginning of the film we’ll notice that the fly and rod legs are so close they actually touch (or skim might be a better word) before opening up again just before turnover. awesome !
this, of course is not a tailing loop as there is tension in both legs and the fly leg doesn’t swoop below and cross the rod leg twice. enjoy !

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