Isonychia-ing

Isonychia Emerger from Matt Grobert  via Tightline Productions

Isonychia… cool name.

torn somewhere between the desire to go fish these critters in their home waters and lavishly repeating that word in some lovely redhead’s ear, i guess for today we’ll (well, i’ll… ) have to just enjoy this creature and tying video from afar.

Primarily an East coast, Midwest (US) insect, this rather handsome emerging ‘Slate Drake’ pattern is simply awesome by it’s simplicity, sturdiness and general profile. in a sense, a mayfly is a mayfly is a mayfly and as such, by changing colors and sizes, the basic pattern will make an all-over all-around great emerger for any waters.

as always, the Mat Grobert/Tim Flagler team make an excellent tutorial displaying excellent technique and know-how well worth paying special attention to.

 ” Their nymphs are among of the fastest-swimming mayflies in the world. They can power their way through fast riffles with ease, and their imitations should be fished with fast twitches.

They are unique among mayflies in that they have extra tuft-shaped gills at the base of their fore legs, a structure normally found in stoneflies. ”

images and nymph quote from TroutNut.com. be sure to click either pic for more info on this sexy bug. enjoy !

a Griffith’s Gnat variant

here’s a seriously interesting emerger offshoot of the infamous G-Gnat.
created by Blue Ribbon Flies and demonstrated by Tim Flagler at MidCurrent, this little bug should do the do and do it well anywhere there’s teeny-tiny midges coming off and dancing about the surface. this one’s in size 20 but the basic idea in various tones and sizes to match your local bugs are sure to raise some trouty interest.
maybe its just me as it took me a little while to figure out the G-Gnat component in this pattern but fly names are fly names and its always good to respectfully attach a variant to its original, and said component happens to be: a very volume-reduced few turns of grizzly hackle over a short peacock herl thorax. those few turns are good enough for me and i’m positive, more than enough for a hungry fish. enjoy !

Fly Tying- Tim’s Double T

by Tim Flagler via MidCurrent

here’s a nifty wee bug sure to unsettle more than a few for more than a few reasons.
firstly, it looks like a dry fly but it isn’t, it’s a wet.

flies with sprouting wings tend to always be associated with in-or-on the surface patterns but anyone, and i guess that’s most of us, have caught fish with a dry fly when it was drowned and just like it’s often very productive to apply floatant to a wet fly and fish it in the surface, the opposite holds true as well. it’s not like either example is a secret but these not-so-conventional methods are very often game-changers, specially when we haven’t sussed out the necessary tactic of the moment or when the fish aren’t really in the mood to play. this tells us a couple of things, at least one of them is fact.

a) bugs don’t always make it through the surface film, or they’re born handicapped, or they got injured during the hatching stage by waterfalls or something, or they got exhausted and couldn’t break through, or maybe Hydra hit it with one of its goofy heads as it was thrashing about or, or, or…
whichever the reason, they’re doomed to helplessly tumble downstream and they’re an easy meal for any subsurface creature that likes to eat bugs.
b) it also subjectively proves that fish aren’t half as selective as some numpties might state since the fish are eating what should be on top of the water, beneath it.

part 2 of the unsettling bit is this fly’s size but for most fishers, that’s more of a mental block than one of visual capabilities. the thing with creating flies this size is they couldn’t be simpler to tie, not only because they require so little materials but mainly because there’s no need for details we tend to find important on larger patterns. this bug has tails, a thread abdomen, some whatever soft fluff as a wing (my preference goes for the tip part of the fluffy part at the base of feathers or even marabou) and a spittle of dubbing. furthermore, it doesn’t need to be all fancy and neat because its a drowned and undevelopped bug.  right ?

how are they fished ? upstream, across, downstream on their own or on a dropper just as you would with any other dry or wet. i like to fish them in teams of two, the point fly tied to a 50 or so cm dropper off the bend of the first fly’s hook bend with two slightly different colour patterns and/or sizes. ’nuff said, get you some and let us know how they did for you. enjoy !

the Perfection Loop knot- Again and again and again and again

the Perfection loop knot has been featured here on TLC more than once. we’ve seen the basic knot and two versions of how to use it as a free-swinging tippet-to-fly junction. one would think that that more-than-enough covers the subject but, Tim Flagler via MidCurrent once again found not only a better way to show us how to tie this standard every angler should know but what really caught my attention is the forth ‘again‘ of this posts’s title: the tippet-to-fly knot that starts at 3:56 in the clip below.

what sets this one apart are the clear and simple techniques used to finely adjust the loop’s size, it’s really a no-brainer that’s super-easy to get right every time and no-braining and getting things right every time allow us to think of more important things while out on the water. things such as chocolate, coffee and maybe even focusing more on why we went there in the first place, to (try to) catch fish. enjoy !

you Dumb Bunny !!!

what’s better than a bunny streamer ?  a Dumb Bunny streamer !

besides being a bit different, what makes the DB maybe better than most ? this great new pattern from Tim Flagler has some interesting features, let’s take a look at them:
– first of all, it’s a bunny fly and bunny flies rule.
– the fly rides point up and i like streamers that ride point up.
– there’s only two materials, bunny strips and a pair of dumb bell eyes.
– its construction is super-simple. beginner simple.
– it looks really good, specially when wet and swimming. (see vid)
– wrapping the body strip around the shank adds just enough bulk to give the pattern’s profile a nice differentiation between body and tail.
– trimming the body’s underfur not only helps to recreated the wedged underbelly shape most baitfish have but also helps the fly to track straight.  as an aside, a thought that instantly came to mind was one could also wrap lead wire around the hook shank prior to wrapping the bunny strip to add more weight for faster/deeper waters and also to accentuate the keel effect.
– as another aside, i don’t really see the point in painting the dumb bell eyes as they’re already pretty close as they are to the basic black shape of fish eyes but maybe that’s just me being a lazy sod…

lots of good points, aye ? enjoy !

Tim’s Little Black Stone

by Tim Flagler via TightLineVideo

hard to think of a nicer, simpler, great surface footprinted, Wonder-Winged, low-riding adult stonefly pattern.
harder yet to think of anything else i could add to what looks like the end-all stonefly imitation except for… enjoy !

ps- well ok, just one thing. try not to crowd the hook eye so much with excess materials when you’re tying your own… 😆

Fly Tying- Some new twists on an Old Cahill

by Tim Flagler via TightLineVideo

a nifty little yellow floating nymph bug indeed ! this little fellow would have come in super-handy a few weeks back in the UK when the Yellow Mays where coming off.
of special tying note and as starters, we’ll revisit a nice and easy way to get splayed mayfly tails with the main course consisting of a really unique manner to create a non-wobbly, stiff, easy to use hackle post with an even more ingenious manner to permanently secure the parachute hackle in just three ultra-simple steps. ya gotta love such brilliant ideas, enjoy !

post note (and just to be unnecessarily picky… )
– personally, i’d leave a few more tail fibres on each side of the fly to a) leave a bigger footprint on the surface that can also hold more floatant and b) even though Coq de Leon fibres are pretty strong, trout teeth are even stronger and the extra fibres usually means having at least a few left if one or several get torn off after a catch.
– i’d also use less UV resin when strengthening the post and over a shorter length to get a shorter overall post but like i wrote, that’s just being picky.

Tying the Blood knot

once again Tim Flagler treats us to another great tutorial and the fly fishing world’s a better place for having people like him around.

blood knot

most anglers are familiar with the all-time classic leader-to-tippet joining Blood knot but some aren’t and some can struggle to get it just right so this one’s for them. on a personal note and to attest to its efficiency, i’ve been using this mono joining knot quasi-exclusively for about forty-five years and can’t remember ever having any kind of problem with it.
follow Tim’s guiding and i’m sure you’ll have the same results. enjoy !

click the top image for a wide selection of knot tutorials previously posted on TLC

Fly Tying Videos- Tim’s Caddis Larvae

by Tim Flagler at tightlinevideo
man, i really love Tim’s tutorials. everything about them; the well and thoroughly thought out descriptions, high film quality, crisp and clear instructions and overall pleasant learning atmosphere make these videos a real gem and this new one’s one of the best he’s produced.
based on a simple go-to caddis larvae suggestive pattern, we’re also treated to fantastic thread control and split-dubbing techniques well worth paying special attention to.  this video deserves to be bookmarked as a reference and is a super-fine video backup to the very same techniques brought up in Dennis Shaw’s more-than-fantastic A Complete Dubbing Techniques Tutorial. enjoy !

this little image gives a nice, simple and generalised visual reference of the bug’s key elements for the tier to keep in mind when tying these imitations.
hydrphsy
should you want to have a slightly more visible segmentation, don’t hesitate tying a few flies with a darker thread that matches the thorax’s dubbing. the darker thread will show through the abdomen a little when wet.
as always, adapt colours and fly size to match your local bugs. lead or standard wire wrapped around the shank will help the fly get down in faster/deeper waters. if you do add weight, use a little less dubbing to preserve the correct proportions or the finished fly will look like a fast-food junky…