Tim’s Asher

fresh off the vice and video editor comes another great tying tutorial by Tim Flagler.

immediately recognised as being in the Griffith’s Gnat family, this tiny coloured variant is yet another go-to pattern to have in the box. Tim’s tie has an orange body but you can easily use whatever colour that matches your local bugs.
as an example, just yesterday there was a midge hatch here at home that had lovely yellowish lime-green bodies and this pattern would have done the trick more than fine, i’m more than certain.

as simplistic a tie as it may seem, these types of patterns are hardcore fish attractors. enjoy !

Jack’s Sparrow

Jack as in Gartside and Sparrow as in this lovely universal, multi-purpose, no frill or bling streamer expertly tied by Tim Flagler.

in a contemporary world where most flies seem to look more like decorated christmas trees than anything else, this classic is a nice reminder that drab is good and often gooder than bling.
its not like i have any problems with blingy flies: if they work, they work and that’s a great thing. on the other hand, in the vast majority of areas i fish in Europe, drab, or rather ‘natural-coloured’ flies outfish bling maybe at an eighty or more percent ratio.
concretely, this means that the blings are at the back of the box, in much lower numbers and are used as a last resort or when waters are very murky. (but even then, black flies always seem to get more attention… )
of course, this is a regional thing and even if you live in a bling part of the world, having a few of these in different sizes stashed away might just save the day when your fish aren’t in a psychedelic mood.

as always and whatever he’s tying, Tim’s tutorials are chock full of obvious and not so obvious tying tricks that also transfer to a myriad of other fly patterns making us better tiers whatever style of fly we tie. as such i’d recommend paying attention to all the finer details.  enjoy !

just in time- the Octobre Cinnamon Caddis Wet

another great tying tutorial from Tim Flagler at Tightlinevideo

these little beauties are all about these days and apart from admiring their cuteness, as trout fishers one of the better things we can do is try to use that cuteness to try to entice some fish before winter sets in.
Tim’s video shows how to construct a very lively and durable wet imitation to be fished as all wets, upstream, across or on the swing. fish it on its own or as a dropper from a nymph or dry. enjoy, and happy catches !

the Definitive Clouser

as just about every single tying video by Tim Flagler, today’s infamous Clouser Minnow tutorial is one to bookmark and keep as a reference.
extreeeemely well detailed with special focus points to help us construct a strong, effective and fish-attracting fly. this is a real gem, enjoy !

Fly Lines- Cleaning and Maintenance

by Tim Flagler via Rio

” Hmm, feels nice, is it a new line ? “
” sort of, its about three years old… “

a direct quote from a course i gave last week and one that seems to repeat itself very regularly.

constantly amazed at how few fly anglers actually clean and treat they’re lines, hopefully a little encouragement followed by two detailed and well explained how-to videos will help reverse this habit and here’s why you should.

let’s start with the bad:
– casting with dirty lines just simply sucks. they make scratchy sounds as they go through rod guides. those scratchy sounds we hear are friction.
friction hinders sliding through the guides and increases friction when the line slides against the blank in-between the guides. this friction makes for jerky over-powered casting instead of the silky smooth casting which should always be our goal.
all this friction gets compounded when hauling and if the lines are sticky enough, it makes the return on a haul next to impossible and this means we introduced slack in the system when we where trying to get rid of it.
as you’ll have also guessed, all this friction greatly hinders line shooting and all this grit and gunk wears down rod guides and of course the lines themselves at remarkable rates.
see ? i told you it sucks. big time.

– dirty floating lines don’t float well, sit lower on the water surface or can actually sink, specially towards the thinner tip. this really sucks too.
the gunk that accumulated on the line prevents the surface tension thing from happening and it slowly goes under.
in the case of nymphing where we watch the line tip we don’t see it anymore and when fishing a floating fly, when we get a strike the extra ‘stick’ caused by the line tip and leader butt being underwater really helps in missed hookups because of instead of the line being instantly pulled up in a straight line from fly to rod tip, the rod end of the fly line goes upwards towards the rod and there’s a level, more or less horizontal portion (the stick) and then another downward angle between line stick and the turning fish.

multiple suck ! not only we had a harder time presenting the fly properly but also put the odds against us when its time to hook up, all ending in the inevitable dork/angst expression typically seen on anglers when this situation occurs !

ok, now for the good:
clean and treated fly lines cast wonderfully. in fact they cast better than straight-out-of-the-box lines because they aren’t treated at the factory…
take all of the negatives written above and reverse them. it’s as simple as that.
a line that’s in good shape, clean and treated flatters your casting and allows the angler to focus on the main goal: having fun, not being frustrated, fly presentation and good clean hook ups.

Tim’s videos are as always great. note all the detailed explanations and you can’t go wrong.
tip- if you have a double kitchen sink, then its even better and easier than buckets !
there’ll be a few more tips at the bottom of the post but for now here’s the vids. enjoy !

– house-hold use micro-fibre cloths work better than those little pads regardless who makes them. i always have this one on my chest pack and among a bunch of it’s other possible uses, when i’m finished fishing i retrieve all the line that’s been used through the cloth and this removes any gunk before it has time to dry on the line. it takes like five extra seconds to do this and delays trips to the sink/buckets maybe tenfold.
line rag– the hardest part is finding the right recipient but when you do, a little pad soaked in line dressing stuffed away in the chest-pack gets a gunky or slowly-sinking line tip and leader butt back in shape in a minute when on the water.
cast out, pinch the line with the pad and just reel in the line. done.
line treatment swab– and lastly, Scientific Angler’s line treatment gel is the best i’ve found and used so far regardless of fly line brand its applied to. it stays on longer and doesn’t need to be dried or wiped down again before using the line again. i’m sure Rio will forgive me…

Davy Wotton’s Davy Knot

coming from Tim Flagler i’m not in the least surprised to see the best Davy Knot video tutorial there is and if that weren’t enough, we also get a ‘Double-Davy’ version for thicker diameter tippets and bigger flies and just to one-up everyone else, Tim demonstrates how to tie either knot with a spring hackle plier, very useful for cold fingers, the seeing impaired or in dark fishing situations.
tip- try the latter with your forceps, it’s even easier and we always (should) have them on us anyway. enjoy !

TightLine Nymphs

a little foray today into the world of competition-type nymphs from the U.S.
as in most comp-style flies we’ll notice a great lack of realism and a strong tendency for generalised shapes, profiles, colours and size: essential triggers.
triggers that work in catching more fish and not more fisherman. they’re also easy, fast and relatively inexpensive to tie, something of importance when deepwater dredging means leaving quite a few on the bottom.

first off the Tungsten Torpedo created by Kevin Compton tied by Mat Grobert. i don’t know if Kevin is still tying for the US team as we haven’t spoken in a while but i’ve been using several of his patterns over the years and if they’re still present in my boxes its because they’re go-getters.
sure, there’s a need for big fatty nymphs as in today’s second set but generally speaking, a lot of mayfly nymph bodies are just too darn plump and maybe more importantly, too dense and light blocking. the TT counters this trend by having a very skinny body and having the dubbing ‘hackle’ settle back along the body during the drift creating a moving, lively, translucent veil. good stuff indeed.

now on to the fatty ! Walt’s Worm and it’s flashier variant created by Walt Young tied by Tim Flagler.
why this thing would be called a worm is beyond me but ! the result is a classic and very simple to tie and expendable caddis or cased caddis or other bottom-tumbling big-profiled bug thing imitation tied on a jig hook to ride point up during the drift and (hopefully) catch a little less on stream bottom structure. personally, and in the alpine-type streams i regularly fish, i find that yes, point-up flies tend to hook up less by the hook point itself but then the bead often gets wedged in between rocks resulting in just a little less flies left in the water. basically, they seem to hang up just the same but if its a ‘wedge’ the fly will usually pop out by doing a roll cast upstream provided there’s fly line outside of the rod tip, not very common when ‘Euro-Numphing’ but hell, nothing’s perfect…

at first glance these flies aren’t all that unique, fancy or impressive but after a closer look they’re the fruit of a lot experience and a heck of a lot of fish. effective fly design at its best. enjoy !

Catskill style flies- the Red Quill

by Tightline Productions tied by Matt Grobert

Art Flick’s old standard just doesn’t get old. it’s elegant, as effective as ever, straightforward to tie (just be sure to get the proportions right !), comprised solely of feathers and as an interesting-quirky feature, was devised to represent the Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) male.
the TroutNut link tells us: “There are significant differences between the males and females in both size and color, and anglers should be prepared to match either one” but unfortunately doesn’t tell us what those differences are… however, once in the imago stage, these mayflies tend to drift for quite a long time before flying off and that’s what makes this ‘old-style high-riding’ fly interesting, specially for those of us who tend to favour emerging imitations over the completed imago.
nuff said, this as-ever great video by Tim Flagler shows in great detail how to get this fly just right. i hope you’ll enjoy.

Stripping Peacock Quills

as a sequel to Agitating the Barbules, today’s tying materials tips and tricks treat from Tim Flagler shows us how easy it is to strip peacock herls to get those easy to make, realistic and yummy segmented bodies for our flies.
when using the bleach method note the finer points to avoid under or over treating the herls and whichever method you choose, that further colouring is as simple as using permanent markers. awesome indeed, enjoy !

Micro Pheasant Tail Nymph

by Tim Flagler – TightLines Productions
the PT nymph needs no special mention. always have an assortment when fishing for insect-eating fishes or miss out on a lot of hooking-up opportunities so, apart from the must-have,
today’s find goes from spot-on tying tips, has a short intermezzo of Tim playing with a soft and sticky looking fish mouth to show us that barbed hooks suck and then we’re back to a whole host of other not-so-common tying techniques in this just-out-today-tutorial.    enjoy !
https://vimeo.com/84027222?email_id=ZGFpbHlfZGlnZXN0fDEyOWVkZGRlMDc3MzUyM2Q4ODM5ZjgzMzkxMWFhNzE2MTIyfDE4MDc3ODR8MTM4OTYxNTU5M3w5Mjc5&utm_campaign=9279&utm_medium=vimeo-digest-daily_digest-20140100&utm_source=email

Barbie’s Wedding (Tippet) Ring

by Tim Flagler (and Barbie) via MidCurrent

too cool not to share, Tim’s advise is spot on with all the fine tips and tricks on how to rig these rings properly and without loosing them in the process !
many a time i’ve heard the recommendation of storing the rings on a small safety pin. please blindly accept that this is the last thing you want to do !
these pins are weak, open up when tightening the knot and all the unused rings spring out at the speed of sound never to be found again. (specially if this is done outdoors) this makes one feel really dumb and feeling really dumb is not good.
most tippet ring suppliers don’t supply a snap as seen in the video but they’re really cheap, can be found in the lure section (ughhh…) in tackle shops and the extra snaps from the pack can be used to secure various thingies in your vest or chest pack.

i’ve been using these rings for years now because they add a bit more versatility, reliability and visibility to my rigs. in other words, it makes changing, adapting and replacing much easier. it’s not like the ‘conventional’ method of directly joining mono to mono is of any problem, but i find myself being ‘less lazy’ when it comes to changing rigs with the rings than with mono-to-mono and this has without a doubt brought more fish to the net.
not mentioned in the video is they can also be used for multi-fly rigs. you can simply add on the dropper tippet forming a ‘T’ or better yet, as the Tangle-Free Duncan Dropper (highly recommended !) tangle-free-dropper-tlc-6-4-13
as a side note and as in a lot of other equipment, be sure to have a good look at the rings before purchase as they are not all created equal. they shouldn’t have a rough or marked surface, nor should the weld be visible because scratchy surfaces scratch mono when tied on and scratch again later during use. not good. we don’t accept scratchy from hook eyes and the same should go here. you might want to bring a pocket loupe to the store…

foam candy

in yet another great tying tutorial by Tim Flagler at Tightline Productions, here’s a simple, quick, inexpensive, visible, great silhouetted and very adaptable to suit your needs by varying colors and sizes grasshopper imitation: an all-gooder for sure.

personal note: i know they are very effective and there is absolutely nothing wrong with Tim’s super bug but i can’t help thinking how nice this pattern would look with some pretty darn-nice Hopper Legs  instead of those weird Rubber-Alien appendages… 😉

how to tie a Woolly Bugger

by  Tim Flagler at Tightline Productions

as Tim points out at the beginning of the video, the Bugger needs no introduction. wooley-bugger-tim-fogler-e1361100237378
unless you’re one of those Halfordian weirdos… simply put, this is a pattern every fly angler should have. it’s often referred to by countless fishers as the absolutely most productive fly. ’nuff said.
below is the best tutorial for this fly i’ve seen. always clear, concise, Tim’s videos are a real treat. tie it weighed or unweighted, big or small and vary colors and accessories like flash or rubber legs.
go nuts but here’s the basics,  enjoy !