March and its Surrealist standard

as tradition would have it, i sat down to tie some much-needed deep-down nymphs, carefully selected all the necessary goodies, bead-heads and other assorted non-floaty materials and went off to make some coffee before starting the assembly process.

'standard' march brown m.fauvet-TLC 5-3-16_edit_edit

once back, all that water-absorbing crap got pushed out of the way, the caffeine blasting long-ago recollections of André Breton’s writings in a random cortex…

“The aim was to resolve the previously contradictory conditions of dream and reality”

his definition of the Surrealist Revolution movement-

Dictionary: Surrealism,

n. Pure psychic automatism, by which one proposes to express, either verbally, in writing, or in the craft of fly tying, the real functioning of thought. Dictation of thought in the absence of all control exercised by reason, outside of all aesthetic and moral preoccupation.

Encyclopedia: Surrealism.

Philosophy. Surrealism is based on the belief in the superior reality of certain forms of previously neglected associations, in the omnipotence of dream, in the disinterested play of thought. It tends to ruin once and for all other psychic mechanisms and to substitute itself for them in solving all the principal problems of life.

all that maybe meaning that this guy’s strung-out subconscious decided that since my dry fly boxes are overabundantly filled in the real world, the dreamy side of things, the one that can’t count flies nor boxes nor reason with reason and thinks soft watches are cool just went ahead, took over, blanked the brain better than any mind-numbing substance could ever do and a dozen or so of my standard March Brown dries size 16 where there waiting for me when my fingers stopped twitching and my eyes opened. a fair amount of drool gently puddling excess materials further proved the “solving all the principal problems of life” part above because wet excess materials don’t fly all about the house and are easily collected and binned.

i’m quite certain that Breton’s arrogance would never have admitted fly tying to be a worthy expression of his beloved revolution/movement but that’s his loss. among other displays of numptiness he was more than happy to vehemently proclaim that music was shit which, even if that’s correct to a certain extent with regards to rap, pop and country music, those musical forms didn’t even exist back then and it’s a stupid thing to say even if it probably felt good to say at the time.

for those interested in the more materialistic aspect of this pattern,

made with:

subconscious love and several juicy materials from my buddy Lucian Vasies at troutline.ro

hook- Maruto D82 BL

thread- Veevus 12/0 brown

tail- Coq de Leon Pardo Rihnon

abdomen- Mad Rabbit (Romanian hare mask)

thorax/wings- Ultra Dense CDC fibres in a dubbing loop, wound with the fibres teased upwards at each turn. be sure to give the bottom a nice Brazilian to keep the imitation flat on the surface and treat the whole thing with Loon Lochsa, the stuff’s awesome.

its a really good-all-purpose mayfly imitation that’s done me good for many years. its my standard.

Winged Nymphs for Dynamic Nymphing

winged-nymph-Lucian-Vasies

some high-level fly design from Lucian Vasies any and every nymph fisher might (read should) take into consideration: it’s that good.

Winged Nymphs for Dynamic Nymphing could be considered a new frontier in fishing nymphs and a new way to tie flies. Some fly tiers consider them ugly. In terms of a classic construction and after the traditional rules to tie a nymph, these flies are quite ugly. These flies don’t follow the rules for conical bodies or for the tail made from feather fibers. What about the typical streamer wings? Something like these was never seen on nymphs. But appearance is not important to these nymphs. Their goal is not to please the fisherman, but to catch fish.”

winged-nymph-tail-Lucian-Vasies

the two key elements setting this beast apart from the rest, both of CDC fibres for the reasons explained in Lucian’s complete text and step-by-step you can access by clicking either pic.

winged-nymph-wing-Lucian-Vasies


Lucian’s a buddy and i know he won’t take this sideways but the fold-over wing isn’t exactly new but that’s of no importance. what is however is this concept is as hot as it gets when it comes to wet fly and nymph design.

here’s my ever so succesful ‘bladge i started tinkering with four years ago. it’s a black midge just subsurface wet, size 20 where the soft,Bladge 25-1-13 fold-over wing was inspired by Peter Dobbs’ Shwartza (bottom pic) created in the early ’90s for the UK reservoir competition scene which in turn might have been inspired by the soft wing tied semi-upright  Clyde style flies from a hundred and more years ago. Clyde wings are typically tied with wings slips from game birds. they’re nowhere as stiff as genetic cock hackles but they retain their wing shape a lot more than the marabou used in the Shwartza or fuzzy fibres found at the base of starling feathers i use for the ‘bladge.

what they do have in common with Lucian’s ingenious idea of using CDC fibres is all these super-soft materials collapse back when wet. since they’re tied in wing-style every fibre is free to move around, both undulating with the current and creating a very life-like ‘outer shell’ of the imitation’s body, something any other tying method has a very hard time replicating. play around with the concept, i promise you won’t regret.

for more on the Shwartza click the pic

Fly Tying- More on Biots

today’s tying tutorial treat comes to us from Romania via buddy  Lucian Vasies, one of my favourite all-time trout-type fly tiers.

we’d previously seen a more-than-nice introduction to this great fly body material in What are biots ? and Lucian’s just-out article comes in to seal the deal and help you get the most from these feather parts. here’s a few extracts:

-when you strip the barb from the stem of the feather you will notice that the structure is not symmetrical. The base is transparent and the upper part is more opaque. Also you’ll see a small gap at the base . This gap is a reference for us in tying process.
step-5-flytying.ro-how-looks-closer-a-biot-by-Lucian-Vasies

The opposite part of the gap is not so transparent and in section has a “T” shape. The barb has a small fin/burr. This fin will provide you a very nice segmentation and you can see it in the photo bellow between arrows:”
step-5-flytying.ro-the-T-side-of-biot-by-Lucian-Vasies

and here are a few results on the different ways to use biots. need i say more ?

step-8-flytying.ro-wide-steps-Lucian-Vasies

step-9-flytying.ro-slim-body-Lucian-Vasies
well, yes because i can’t help it… as noted in the article and easily seen and demonstrated in the images above is one of the biot’s fantastic properties: its translucency.
be sure to keep that in mind and use it to its full advantage by strategically selecting an appropriately toned thread or other material under-wrap to reflect light through the wound biot. in the examples above the underbody used was white thread but the possibilities are endless. if you really want the colours to ‘pop’ you could always lay a base of flashabou or similar mirrory-like material and  conversely, you can always tone down and dull or subtly change the biot’s colour by again selecting a primary thread base colour to let it show through the biot. here’s a colour wheel chart to help you mix and match. as we see on the chart, if we have a yellow biot placed over a blue underbody we’ll have a greenish/olive result. 

’nuff said ! click either pic for the complete article. enjoy !

a Nice and Nifty Knotted Knaddis Nymph

another super-nice tying tutorial for a more-than-realistic-enough caddis larvae imitation by Hammer Creek Fly Fishing

hammer creek knotted nymph

well explained and pleasant to listen to, we’ll get to easily assimilate the simple construction process of the woven body, a method easily transposed to many other insect types and patterns with any variety of different weaving materials. the mind’s the limit.
as noted at the end of the video and something i really like, is the light coat of varnish over the whole back portion of the fly to “melt everything together” giving the finished result ‘that special touch’ and a lovely translucency. enjoy !

on a personal note although not meant as criticism, i’d recommend not starting the body so far down the bend of the hook as this greatly reduces effective hook space (its fish-holding properties) or better yet, simply using a bigger sized hook with the same fly material proportions or finding a different hook with a wider gape such as the awesome Competition Demmon G600 BL.

Tying a Troutline Catgut Biothread Nymph

these little beauties from Lucian Vasies are the chocolate covered marshmallow-filled fish candy hot dogs of the nymph world, some of the handful of freshwater fly patterns that fit in the “If a fish won’t take them flies they don’t deserve to be caught… “ category and better yet, they’re a super-easy and super-fast pattern to tie. hard to beat on all levels, aye ?
micro-french-nymphs-for-trout-and-grayling-tied-with-troutline-catgut-biothread

“The Micro Nymph tied bellow with Catgut Biothread is a fly used in East Europe for his realistic look and for “easy to be tied” fact. A fly like this is efficient for his generic aspect and can be considered a search type of pattern. In fact this pattern is tied with body made of different types of threads but catgut gives a special look . The translucency is very unique and gives a realistic aspect to all flies ( nymphs or emergers ) tied with this fantastic material.”
step-4body-of-nymph-tied-with-troutline-catgut-biothread

click either pic for the complete step-by-step and HERE to source Biothread.
bon appétit , enjoy !

fish vision- zeroing in on lunch

i often wonder how fish see our flies.
we know that the vast majority of fish can see but we have no exact idea how they see.

constantly intrigued and amazed that they could mistake our imitations or suggestive flies to the point where they’ll feel confident enough to open their mouths, further questioning their visual capabilities… i guess i’m glad they do because fly fishing would become boring really quickly if they never did.

here’s an imaginative and highly inaccurate yet hopefully, visually pleasant rendition of the last second before a fly is taken.

'how they might see our flies' M.Fauvet:TLC 6-10-14

Fly Tying Videos- a Catgut Caddis Pupae

remember these catgut lovelies ?
catgut nymph
catgut nymph Lucian Vasies close-up

well, today’s a fly tying double-celebration day !

firstly, it’s Lucian Vasies‘ first video tying tutorial (congrats mate !)
and secondly (well, it ties in with the first point so its not really a a firstly/secondly thing but it sounds good ?..) anyhow, here’s how to tie this oh-too-yummy-to-resist caddis pupa starring über-cool and realistic catgut/biothread that you can get directly from Lucian here.

tip: catgut needs to be soaked in water for 10 or so minutes before tying. since it dries up when stored, this makes it soft and flexible and very easy to wrap around the hook shank. plus, we get to see exactly how the fly will look when it’s wet and fishing: transluco bug-sexy !

btw, in case you’re wondering, this is what an aubergine looks like.
(some might call it an eggplant) Aubergine

Dirty Dusting with a new dubbing

dirty duster 3 m.fauvet:tlchaving received some yummy new, just-out Emerger Dubbing from Lucian Vasies at Troutline the other day i thought i’d give it a try on a simple, hardcore classic, Bob Wyatt’s Dirty Duster generic emerger pattern.

in typical form, when i photographed the resultant flies i got carried away by the beauty of these hackles and completely forgot to clearly photograph the abdomen part so, this dubbing thing will have to be a two part affair…
but ! just for info, it’s lovely, comes in five colours, has very small flashy bits to it and its a dream to roll on the thread !
dirty duster 1 m.fauvet:tlc
Bob trims the lower half of the wound hackle (as in the top pic) but on some flies i like to leave a few fibres and bend them back with fine tweezers to represent legs flopping about under the surface. sometimes another trigger point to get the fish’s attention doesn’t hurt, besides it’s pretty.

tip- with this pattern it’s important to apply floatant only to the ‘winged’ hackle and wet the abdomen and legs with saliva or whatever goo to make sure they’re under the surface as soon as the fly lands on the water.

Special Fuzzers

fuzzies m.fauvet:tlc

a slim lead wire core covered entirely with Special Emerger Thread in two tones (a little darker for the thorax), the idea was to make a slimmer and slightly heavier variant of Frank Sawyer’s Killer Bug.
it’s hard to think of a simpler fly to tie and they look luscious and lively once wet. i’m feeling optimistic.

 

fuzies 2 m.fauvet:tlc

Cascade Nymph

named that way because that’s precisely it’s playing ground.

Cascade Nymph m.fauvet:tlc 23-3-14whether presenting it from the side or casting directly upstream into the boil (or even above and let it tumble in), this type of flashy, heavy, big and bulky fly more than often does the trick when all the fish see is something like this:
you got it, its busy and noisy and to get there attention, something a lot bigger than ‘normal’ needs to stand out from all the bubbles, smaller bugs and debris that gets washed down. simply put, the dainty calmer-water flies we’ll use down or upstream of these waterfalls have a much lesser chance of being seen and trout tend to not eat what they can’t see !
knowing full well that a lot would consider this fly as more of a grayling attractor, if you remember this post you’ll also remember that the least of my interests is trying to catch ugly fish, but ! beautiful fish love it too which in turn, makes me happy  because i still get to tie and fish ugly flies without having to deal with the horrible horrids

tied with love &
hook- Demmon DGS 900 BL #10
bead- tungsten 3.5mm black
thread- Veevus 8/0 black
rib- Veevus French Tinsel large gold
after completion of the fly the rib was coated with a reddish-brown marker
abdomen- Hends Spectra Flash peacock
thorax- Hends Spectra black
brush out the dubs with a velcro stick once finished

Catch & Release the funny way.

sent in by Lucian Vasies at troutline.ro from a recent fishing trip in Italy, this has to be my all-time favourite c&r selfie ever !

“I tried to make a photo and the camera was set at 3 sec. So in that time interval I was able only to fall down and not to make that classic photo with a big smile and my trout in my arms… “

Lucian Vasies c&r

here’s hoping we get to see many more images like this my friend !

Darth Nympher

darth nympher 1 m.fauvet:tlc

alright, the name’s complete dork but i couldn’t help it…

made with-
love
hook- Demmon DGS 900 BL #16
bead- black brass 2mm
thread- Veevus 8/0 black 
rib- Veevus Monofil 0,20mm black
thorax- Buggy Dubbing black

some parts of the rib shifted from its segmentation symmetry when the retracting varnish i applied dried but that’s ok. Darth wasn’t perfect either.

two flies of a feather

same hook, same hen feather.
spider 2 m.fauvet:tlc 19-3-14 one spider has a yellow abdomen and orange head, the other all orange.
i think they’ll make a smashing couple on the water.

spider m.fauvet:tlc 19-3-14

hook & hen cape- TroutLine
thread- Veevus

Coq de Leon Pardo Colour Chart

as a follow up to Lucian Vasies‘ first introduction to the various types of Coq de Leon feathers: Indio and Pardo, todays focus is on the different types and colour schemes of Pardo feathers. almost too pretty to use…

Pardo Corzuno Crudo
Image

Pardo Corzuno Claro
Image

Pardo Corzuno Medio
Image

Pardo Corzuno Oscuro
Image

Pardo Corzuno Rojito
Image

Pardo Flor de Escoba
Image

Pardo Flor de Escoba sin Penca
Image

Pardo Tostado
Image

Pardo Sarrioso
Image

Pardo Rubion
Image

Pardo Aconchado
Image

you’ll find a fine selection of these feathers and all sorts of tying goodies at Lucian’s online shop troutline logo

don’t hesitate to contact him at office@troutline.ro for any special requests

itsy bitsy

itsy bitsy TLC 30-11-13

hook- Maruto wet fly #18
thread- Veevus 16/0 black
abdomen- tip of a porcupine bristle
thorax- Mad Rabbit dubbing (hare mask)
hackle- partridge

Lucian’s G – Nymph

by Lucian Vasies

my, that’s a pretty G !

G Nymph 1

i’d probably start blushing if asked which exact mayflies nymphs have gills like these,
contrasting-nymph-1but i have a hard time blushing  so it’s enough to say that some bugs have them and some bugs don’t. however,  these lovely G Flies most certainly have them and for the moment, that’s about all that matters. i guess.
todays step-by-step is a silent one and i like that. it makes us have to visually anchor the tying process by paying attention to all the little details and maybe best of all, transcends all languages. with demonstrations like this there’s no need for words. thanks Lucian.

G Nymph 2

can’t get enough…G Nymph 3

click either image for the complete step by step and materials list. enjoy !

“A black cat crossing your path signifies that the animal is going somewhere”

~ Groucho Marx

black cat (wet) TLC 4-9-13

Black Cat
-made with-

love
hook- Maruto C46 WBL #16
Thread- Veevus 12/0
tail- hen barbs
abdomen- thread
wing- hen fibers from the base of the feather
hackle- hen
all materials in black

limbo|ˈlimbō|- (or seductive undulating and alternative uses of foam in fly design)

noun
1 the abode of ‘unbaptized’  nymphs, and of the just who died or are about to before hatching.
2  a voluntary uncertain period of awaiting a decision or resolution; an induced intermediate state or condition or indecision of water level beingness: the fate of these insects is now in limbo: neither floating nor sinking, just ‘there’.
• a state of neglect or oblivion: cast out and allowed to reside in a state of piscatorial limboness.

'Limbo' TLC 11-7-13

ORIGIN late Middle French ‘Limbes’: from the medieval Latin phrase in limbo, from limbus ‘hem, border, intermediate, limbo.
’limbo 2 |ˈlimbō|noun ( pl. limbos )
verb [ no obj. ]
to fish in such a way.

ORIGIN 2: back to the foam part.
in a roundabout way, it’s pretty simple to make a fly float or sink. create an ensemble of floating/floatant holding materials in a sufficient volume and it should easily stay on top through fast and slow waters and maybe even after catching a few fish if the materials aren’t too slime-absorbant.
invert those basics and if need be add some actual weight and it’ll sink towards the bottom easily.
now, what about when we’re faced with fish that are greedily eating bugs just under the surface and are completely ignoring any fly presented above or below them ?
a pretty standard  technique in this situation is to control fly depth through the use of various types of fly line densities (or various density sink-tips) but that involves retrieving the line in stillwaters or having the line ‘swing’ in currents. that’s all fine and well but sometimes (often… ) that’s too much movement as far as the fish are concerned. a lot of observations in many water types have shown that they can be lazy bastards at times and will only be interested in bugs that are basically stationary: close to their slimy mouths…

enter the Limbo (or any other pattern that can be relied to hover as much as possible before eventually sinking): and here’s where the foam and ultra-soft materials come in.
closed-cell foam is usually considered a sure-fire floating material but depending on its volume and whether its compressed or not changes that common characteristic to one that also helps a fly stay under the surface yet sink as slowly as possible: the closest thing we can get to actual hovering.
less of a problem in faster waters, in a still or slow water situation, if we use ‘standard’ materials such as cock hackle or even pheasant tail fibers for the tail and some stiffish dubbing say, like a lot of non-water-absorbing synthetics or seal’s fur we end up with a stationary and pretty rigid imitation. replace those stiffish materials with the soft, water absorbing materials like very soft hen hackle for the tail and rabbit underfur combined with no more than a dozen hare ear guard hairs to represent a few legs and other straggly emerging bits and now we have an imitation of a bug that’s stationary yet moving a little bit as if it’s still alive or gently undulating with the current in its death.
this gets the lazy bastard’s attention.

this fly’s general profile is pretty  generic so that leaves us a lot of room to adjust the basic construction ideas to match the various bugs of our waters. the trick here compared to the standard float or sinking fly is finding the exact balance between the floating and sinking elements without forgetting how it has to combine with the hook’s weight or some eventual pull from the leader.
this takes some experimenting. expect to come up with a lot of duds and stripping the hook to start all over again before finding the ‘just right’. i test each one at home before fishing them. it’s one of the better uses of bidets there is.
also keep in mind that everything usually changes when going up or down a hook size or hook shape or from one type of insect to another. to be honest, this has been the toughest challenge i’ve ever encountered in fly tying but then, there aren’t a whole lot of times when ‘cracking the code’ feels this good when all else fails.

you can find all the necessary goodies to make these critters and a lot more from Lucian Vasies at TroutLine.ro

Related articles

More Cat Gut !

we’ve already seen the yummymagicalyamazingful results cat gut* can give on caddis and mayfly nymphs by Lucian Vasies and today’s hot-off-the-vise video is from Davie McPhail tying his own version of a caddis larva using the same cat gut from Lucian’s online shop troutline.ro
enjoy !

i can imagine stocks will go out quite fast.

* once again:  no need to worry, no pussy was turned inside-out to supply us with this ultra-cool tying material ! it’s something like gross sheep or lab rats or something… :mrgreen:

related articles

the Tangle-Free Duncan Dropper

tangle-free dropper TLC 6-4-13
i came about this way to rig a dropper quite by accident sometime last summer. it was pretty dark and i was changing the tippet of the main leader and noticed while attaching it to the tippet ring with a Duncan Loop knot shown below (falsely named Uni-knot) that i had poorly judged the amount of tag end (something like 20-25cm / 8-10″…) and for some reason continued, finished and seated the knot. i obviously hadn’t planned adding a dropper and fly but this accident decided for me. in a “what the hell” mood i gave it a try, tied on a nymph and a few casts later caught a fish on that same dropper fly. good beginning.
as we can see, the Duncan’s knot slides along the standing line and seats itself against the hook eye. other than that the knot itself is basically symmetric meaning, in my eye, and after subsequent tests that that compared to a lot of other knots it’s equally strong whether it’s pulled in one direction or the other.
now, the funny thing is that this knot was originally intended to be a loop knot to allow the fly to move freely (read ‘falsely named Uni’ link above) but it easily slides towards the hook eye with a good pull or a good fish but it doesn’t readily slide backwards when pulling on the tag end. interesting.


sure, there are other ways of making droppers and this is just another option. with tippet rings one can just tie the dropper leg to the side of the ring similar to a Pater Noster the bait freaks use . without rings they can also be made by using a long tag end of a Blood knot or double/triple Surgeon’s knot. (i don’t use Surgeon’s because they seat overlapped and crooked. i know very well that it’s a very good, strong and reliable knot but i can’t stand the crooked presentation nor its messy ugliness… )
another method is to tie the dropper from the bend of the preceding fly’s hook bend and the whole rig stays in line. some call it New Zealand style. it’s a great method and nothing could be simpler but it can, depending on the upper fly and how it’s intended to ‘swim’, impede it’s action.

now, the tangle-free part. apart from the ‘off the bend’ or horrid Surgeon’s knot, they all tangle like crazy while casting, specially when casting mid to long range where we tend to false cast more and that’s a shame as it puts off a lot of anglers from using multiple fly rigs (when allowed by local regulations) because it’s a big pain in the ass to constantly untangle and maybe even more so because every drift that had a tangle in the system was a drift that might have put off the fish because the fly(s) where probably going sideways or even backwards all the while having a nest of monofilament mysteriously connected to these awkward imitations, something i’m sure most fish don’t feel too good about.

what’s so cool about the Duncan Dropper is that it rarely tangles if at all.

logic, for lack of a better term, would dictate that a dropper somewhat firmly held at a right angle from the main line would tangle less but it turns out that it’s the other way around. my guess is it has something to do with higher air resistance and the ensuing turbulences created during the casting stroke(s). just a guess that’s not important but what is, having the tag/dropper end come out parallel to the standing line from the knot itself takes away almost all hassles leading to more fun while fishing.
an extra bonus is this method allows us to fish much longer droppers than usual. 50-60 cm are no problems even with bigger flies such as streamers. the longer dropper not only takes the fly away from an online ‘symmetric’ presentation (with the other flies) but since the dropper is longer, the monofilament gives a more fluid/less rigid connection to the main line leaving the dropper fly to move freely thus more lifelike. the extra length of course means not having to redo the dropper after the consequent shortening due to changing flies as much as with shorter lengths.

this dropper does have the limitation of needing to be connected to a ring of some kind but it works equally well on either fly line end loops, monofilament loops (such as a Perfection knot or double/triple Surgeon’s (yuck) and even on furled/braided/poly-leader type leader bodies.
EDITbig D’Oh !!! moment happened later on today when i was out practicing and connecting the red Amnesia line as seen above to another piece. i had forgotten about the Duncan to Duncan knot and using this takes away the limitations mentioned above.
i use the D-to-D to connect mono when joining say, bigger to smaller mono diameters (the Blood knot doesn’t hold well unless the two materials joined are close or similar ex: 4X to 5X is fine but not so good  from  4X to 6X or 7X) and also to connect the finer tippets like 7X and 8X. knot1

i don’t know how i forgot this but there you go, it’s not limited to being attached to some kind of loop or ring. perfect !

as for its strength with a fish on, it’s not like we normally target the bigger, stronger species using dropper rigs but just as an example, a few weeks back i landed a very fit, hard fighting river rainbow trout of 64cm and the knot didn’t move the slightest bit.

to conclude, it’s not like fishing multiple fly rigs are a necessity. they do after all offer a few inconveniences (tangles) say, when landing a hooked fish, multiple hook ups can be a bit stressful to the heart (although fun as hell !) and of course, those who are fond of casting their flies into branches lose two or three flies instead of just one.

thing is, i’m more and more convinced that two or three flies get a fish to commit a lot more than with a single fly and this whether it’s a fish on its own or in groups where these flies might trigger a competitive reaction. something definitely worth trying.

related articles

blanking, fish coffee and worms.

last time i went fishing i blanked. now onto more interesting stuff.

apart from the mandatory rod, reel, line, well organized chest-pack with nippers (well sharpened), forceps, floatant, net, sink paste, extra tippet, extra leaders, some flies, hand rag, tippet rings, a do-whatever needle, hook sharpening stone, lip gook, extra nippers, amadou patch (from Troutline), knife, emergency whistle, lighter and smokey things, hat, polarizer glasses in amber & yellow, buff and whatever clothing needed for the day and a million more things (basically all the above in double or triple) safely tucked away next to the mattress and the chocolate box in the van, the absolute most biggest necessity for a successful day on the water:

TLC espresso maker isn’t really the custom engraved, on-the-go espresso maker but the van.

see, what happened is, not only had i not brought the coffee maker (which isn’t such a big thing considering i didn’t yet own this beauty at the time) but since the van was at the doctor’s i took another car for the day. a Mazda.
i did miss two strikes, one on a dry and the other on a nymph and i did actually see one whole fish within range but wasn’t able to present a fly to it it before it wandered off out of sight: meaning that even if it was all trickle, drop by drop slow, the fish hadn’t all mysteriously disappeared into some weird, black, worm-hole (more on that later) but simply that my good mojo had been sucked out by the freak replacement vehicle on the trip to the water.
going back through my fishing journal at home i realized that blanking hadn’t happened in the last year and a half. i believe that’s a first for me since i started fishing something like 47 years ago so i’m actually quite pleased. blanking in itself isn’t any problem whatsoever, it’s actually a good thing as it makes one think a lot more about why one blanked as opposed to when having a good day where i’ll find myself running on ‘automatic’ and all seems to happen in a blur. sort of.  besides, thinking doesn’t hurt.
anyhow, on that particular far away day i happened to have gone to the water in someone else’s car and it happened to be a Mazda.

random occurrences are only considered random because our brains aren’t sufficiently developed to encompass all variables and we comfortingly use it as an excuse so, what remains is, things don’t happen without a cause and finally, we can deduct through scientific proof  (of sorts… but these two incidences are more than enough for me to reach this conclusion) that blank fly fishing days are caused by Mazdas.

as for the worms, Worm 2 thanks to our friends at Fly Fish Food in what might just be the most important reminder a fly fisher should keep in mind at all times: ie, that all fish love worms in one form or another and will eat them any time, anywhere and even just for heck of it, perhaps with the idea of embarrassing the more ‘noble’ insects such as mayflies: double-meaning that if we chose to try to entice them with anything else, it’s just a matter of irrational wishful thinking. combine the latter with a deep mojo-sucking Mazda and you’re screwed from the get-go.Worm 6

to conclude, firstly as a public service/good will thing to my fellow fly anglers and mankind in general, i sincerely hope the Mazda company collapses. something like a big huge-monsterous tsunami tidal wave while the employees are out having coffee would do the trick nicely i think. i don’t really mean them much harm as i’m sure fly fishing mojo probably isn’t very high on their list and they’re not doing it on purpose but fuckem’ for making me blank.

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‘honey

what’ll probably be a nice all-round something-or-other emerger for the soon to be river season.

'honey 10-2-13made with-

love

hook- Maruto C47 bl size 18
thread- Veevus 16/0 black
abdomen- honey peacock quill
thorax- hare & seal’s fur, honey and black mixed
wing- EP international fibers, black & off-white mixed

an ugly fly for an ugly fish

if ever there was a friggin’ ugly and stupid looking fish, this is it.
uglylipsgrayling

grayling  (Thymallus thymallus):  their flaccid, distorted, insecure ‘Angelina‘ lips and biology class dead frog expressions are the disgrace of the animal world.
often referred to as “The Lady of the Streams” by what must be myopic, sexually repressed, football or hockey-on-tv-watching anglers, we’ll note that this expression is a horrible insult to women of all kinds.  i’d gladly sucker-punch the ******** who came up with the term and greatly incourage you to do the same next time you hear those despicable words.

these things often live in pods where there can be hundreds of them scrounging around meaninglessly right around your feet. once found, the hardest challenge for the angler is to avoid stepping on them while wading. once hooked, they fight like they look: like a flip-flopping one-legged sheep with butt cancer and to make things worse…  just like vampires, a lot of these creepy things don’t even show up on film leaving the impression that the whole thing was just a bad dream  !

no grayling

anyhow, a lot of us live in areas where trout fishing is closed during their reproductive season and we’re left to resort to  this soggy species if we want to fish in rivers so, as pitiful as these creatures may be they still need to eat and to trick them we’ll often need to resort to ‘flie’s that match their looks, personalities and lack of  taste.
along the same lines as a Happy-Meal placed in front of a pimply kid, this strange, unnatural and otherwise all-around offensive ‘discodildo on a hook’ wakes up these stupid fish’s appetites and gets them to open their disgusting mouths long enough to set the hook.
this fly-thing is very heavy and it’s not really safe to cast. it’s lobbed Euro-Nymphing style through fast and deep pools and holes and we dredge the bottom where these horrid fish hide in shame waiting for something ugly to be swept downstream into their gross mouths.
the line/leader  is tight and takes are usually lacking in subtlety so all we have to do is lift the rod and slide the slimy thing to the net, slip out the ‘fly’ and let it go back where it belongs. job done, next.

disco-dildo (a grayling fly)

made with-
no love whatsoever but a deep sense of desperation mingled with an overwhelming urge to offend any dry-fly purist i might meet on the water.

hook– Partridge “pre-leaded for ugly fish, grub style” #12.
flatten out the round body with pliers so it doesn’t look like a jumbo hotdog when finished.
be sure to sharpen the points as they’re pre-dulled at the factory.
under thread – anything white and cheap, it’s just to make a nice smooth discodildo shape that will be covered by:
abdomen‘ –  Glitter Thread chose the color to match your own tastes, these fish are too dumb to see the difference
head–  Demmon Hot Spot Thread in orange. they’re attracted to orange and considering there’s no orange food available to them naturally, this makes perfect sense.

i’m always fond of saying that “any fish is a good fish”, except for grayling…

‘Debra

Emerging Debra

Debra was a girl i went to school with when i was a kid. having recently found class photos at my parents place, i discovered that she and i where in the same class for ten years and usually side by side both in class and on the class shots. we where always together doing what kids do. i loved her then and even though i have no idea what she has become, that love is still there. she was a redhead, a tomboy but a cautious tomboy. she always stayed right beneath the surface while i floated high and took the blame for the both of us.
cdc ptn emerger foam head