Isonychia-ing

Isonychia Emerger from Matt Grobert  via Tightline Productions

Isonychia… cool name.

torn somewhere between the desire to go fish these critters in their home waters and lavishly repeating that word in some lovely redhead’s ear, i guess for today we’ll (well, i’ll… ) have to just enjoy this creature and tying video from afar.

Primarily an East coast, Midwest (US) insect, this rather handsome emerging ‘Slate Drake’ pattern is simply awesome by it’s simplicity, sturdiness and general profile. in a sense, a mayfly is a mayfly is a mayfly and as such, by changing colors and sizes, the basic pattern will make an all-over all-around great emerger for any waters.

as always, the Mat Grobert/Tim Flagler team make an excellent tutorial displaying excellent technique and know-how well worth paying special attention to.

 ” Their nymphs are among of the fastest-swimming mayflies in the world. They can power their way through fast riffles with ease, and their imitations should be fished with fast twitches.

They are unique among mayflies in that they have extra tuft-shaped gills at the base of their fore legs, a structure normally found in stoneflies. ”

images and nymph quote from TroutNut.com. be sure to click either pic for more info on this sexy bug. enjoy !

Caenis insights

or enlarged views of the ‘angler’s curse‘.
just that common name alone should get our attention even if it sounds a bit masochistic fishing-wise, even for those of us who love a challenge !

“When the important hatches of Tricorythodes were first discovered by anglers, Caenis was given the credit. We now know that the Caenis mayflies are a different group, smaller and less common in trout streams, and they hatch in the evening instead of the morning.

They very rarely elicit selective feeding, but when they do they’re very tough to match because they’re often much smaller than size 28. This difficulty has earned them the nickname “Angler’s Curse.”

simple enough to say, even if these early observers didn’t have a watch or map… what comes out in the end in practical terms for us fly anglers is these thingies are very-very small and their proportions are completely off from the larger mayfly species as they have stout bodies, specially the thorax and long tails and antennae and the wings tend to sit out on the sides ‘spent-like’ instead of the usual top: basically the trigger points we’ll want to recreate when tying these flies.

here’s some reference vintage plates of our beautiful little friends to use while we’re at the tying bench. enjoy !

caenis_luctuosa_by_guiguiblitz-d5zfqamcaenis 2caenis 3and just because its so cool to see details millions of times bigger than life size,
caenis parts

angler’s curse quote via TroutNut.com
vintage plates via Google Images

a bourbon-flavored Iron Blue Dun

here’s a super-sweet, superbly tied Blue Dun imitation by 0031flyfishing

very much inspired by Marc Petitjean’s methods of working with cdc, following the basic guideline of this great tutorial and varying colors, sizes, omitting the red tag or not will lead to an extremely good generic imitation of just about any of the bazillions varied creatures of the Ephemeroptera (mayfly) family. *

picture_2994_small
crank up the volume and enjoy !

* (and more or less any other bug that has wings, a body and a tail)
for more info on the natural insect click the pic to access troutnut.com‘s page.

Sulfur Emerging with Matt

by Matt Grobert  via Tightline Productions

Dorothea, oh Dorothea !
(or otherwise, Pale Evening Dun (but in this case it’s not really a Dun so let’s stick to plain old Dorothy))
watch out folks, she’s a redhead and she means business !

” These insects are actually too perfect for dry fly fishing, which makes matching their hatches difficult.

The nymphs may drift for a while just below the surface before trying to break through. When they do, it takes them a long time to crawl out of their shucks. After that, they ride the water for an exceptionally long time to dry their wings, and low-floating patterns like the Comparaduns are preferred. And as if that weren’t enough, they are also one of the most cripple-prone of all mayfly species, and trout may feed selectively on their cripples and stillborns. “

exciting ! here’s how to tie her up… 

click on the quote for more redhead info at troutnut.com. enjoy !