a Rainbow flag

generally speaking, i’m not a fan of flags. however, i like things that flap around in the wind… and have been working on a small series of wind-flappers that have no national, regional or societal connotations but instead are an attempt to, and this is a big word, to glorify nature. here’s the Rainbow flag.

rainbow flag m.fauvet-TLC 14-8-16

Bubbles and Bubba

Bubbles reminded me of being a little kid in the local lake just sitting there, feeling the water, head just above the surface blowing little bubbles because blowing little bubbles is tingly, they make a heck of a lot more noise underwater than above and it just feels good and exciting.

Bubba is more than comfortable with subsurface bubbling. i’m told it’s a skill that just gets better and better with age so, i guess i’ll just have to go see if that’s true.

for the love of water

and everything that lives in it.image

this creature lies in one of my favourite playgrounds, the Aude river near home. the fish that live in it are rather pretty as well.

“falling in love is not at all the most stupid thing that people do”


i agree, sometimes stupid is good.
Pyrenean streambed m.fauvet-TLC 14-2-16_edit

quote- Albert Einstein
Lecanoscopy (For the Love of Water) image- Pyrenean streambed

remember the last time you where swimming in the sea at night,

the inevitable ‘duh-DUHHHHHH’ playing over and over in your head getting louder and louder further increasing the super-creepy yet i love it and i don’t care, that only happens to others feeling ?
well, you couldn’t see it but this is what was going on beneath you.

Can you breathe through your butt ?

probably not and however much i try, i can’t either… but thanks to the inquisitive and coolnerdy group at Noticing we’ll find out how and why dragonfly nymphs do exactly that and other exciting things with their wiggly butts.
we’ll also get a pretty darn good explanation how mayfly and other nymphs manage to breathe whilst being underwater (something i’m already pretty sure none of you can do) and all sorts of nifty and fascinating things about our favourite bugs. mayfly-gills1wonderfully explained, this article is well worth sharing with your little ones as its yet another fantastic example of the marvelous, adaptive, fascinating capabilities of the animal world right there at our (wet) feet. they’ve found the perfect balance of easy-to-understand informative while keeping things light and humorous. the site is quite new yet they’re off to a fantastic start and i really-really wish them well.

to read more and see a video showing why dragonfly nymphs are next best thing after Alien and find out why all these grey beachballs are trying to prevent the red one from going out you’ll have to click on it to see. enjoy !

How trout take subsurface flies

this film is really interesting and not something we get to see very often.
the purists will moan and groan that this study was done on stocked fish using stocked fish flies but even if its ultimately possible, its also highly improbable that someone is going to go through all the effort and time to get the same footage on wild stock, besides, i don’t think it would make for a big difference. also, wild fish of the same size don’t tend to congregate so much, further decreasing the competitive agressivness seen in this video so, let’s just take from this what we can.
firstly, seeing fish attack flies is well, exciting. its one of the major reasons we do what we do. also, from a practicle aspect, this vid says a lot about how fast they’ll spit that fly back out; something we tend to not like as much !

i didn’t bother counting but what seems more than obvious was how fast the deer hair muddler-headed fly (the first in the series) was spit out. after viewing this several times there even seemed to be a panicked expression (i know, i know. that’s dangerous ground but please bare with me on this one, here’s my point)-
take a muddler head fly and hold it between your fingers; its prickly and stiffish and doesn’t feel like any ‘normal’ fish food and that leads me to this, at least for the moment, conclusion.
its not to say that muddlers aren’t great flies because they are but the spit-out rate and how fast its spit out ratio seems higher than with non-prickly adorned flies and this from what the purists are calling ‘dumb fish’…

fly no. 2 and 4, generic non body-hackled wooly bugger type lures (for lack of a better name) are kept in the mouth longer. had the hook point been there these would have produced more hook-ups because the angler would have had more time to react to the takes.

enough rambling, whether we come to any practicle conclusion regarding fly designs or not, its still something i’m sure you’ll enjoy watching.


kaleidoscope |kəˈlīdəˌskōp|
a toy consisting of a tube containing mirrors and pieces of coloured glass or paper, whose reflections produce changing fin patterns that are visible through an eyehole when the tube is rotated.
• a constantly changing pattern or sequence of objects or elements: the fish moved in a kaleidoscope of colour.
ORIGIN early 19th cent.: from Greek kalos ‘beautiful’ + eidos ‘form

one could (i would) argue that its a little strange, even unnatural to take one of nature’s most interesting components; asymmetry, and render it to a pretty base human concept; symmetric, but sometimes it works out ok as long as it doesn’t happen with any frequency. human concepts and trippy images or not, kudos to the Greeks for having created a beautiful word and for fish being just what they are, breathtaking.

kaleidofin fish portraits m.fauvet-TLC 9-9-15

for further and quite interesting thoughts on symmetry click HERE.

The closer he looks at the fish, the less he sees…

“We refer to the custom of placing a quantity of small dots of two colours very near each other, and allowing them to be blended by the eye placed at the proper distance … The results obtained in this way are true mixtures of coloured light … This method is almost the only practical one at the disposal of the artist whereby he can actually mix, not pigments, but masses of coloured light.”
Georges Seurat on Pointillisme

“We do it out of contempt for human art, but mostly because it makes us pretty.”
Trout on ‘The Beautiful art of Camouflage’

RB dosalfin m.fauvet-TLC 3-6-15

Common sense and Hope.

there’s a lot to think about in this short 9 minute video.
– it’s about not taking short cuts and thinking ahead.
– it’s about doing right when wrong was done.
– it’s where man and nature work together for mutual benefit.
– and basically, it’s about love.
– enjoy !

there’s plenty of ugly

and plenty of beauty. here’s two examples of the latter to help balance out the first.

first up, Boreal Trouts‘ first film “A collection of underwater footage collected during the 2014 field season in Northeastern Minnesota” filled with babies, not-so babies and mature adult trout doing the rub-thing. yet another of these underwater river films giving us terrestrials an intimate vision of our little friends a million times better than any aquarium could.

and some magic from 3hund, this time not entirely natural but an awesome (yes, the term is justified for once) combination where man meets nature in a rare complementary form. maybe something we might see on the way to or from the river should we divert our eyes from the beaten path…

be sure to watch them in full screen and HD. enjoy !


you’re both butt-ugly and beautiful.

“Deep-sea anglerfish are strange and elusive creatures that are very rarely observed in their natural habitat. Fewer than half a dozen have ever been captured on film or video by deep diving research vehicles. This little angler, about 9 cm long, is named Melanocetus. It is also known as the Black Seadevil and it lives in the deep dark waters of the Monterey Canyon. Doc Ricketts* observed this anglerfish for the first time at 600 m on a midwater research expedition in November 2014. We believe that this is the first video footage ever made of this species alive and at depth.”
* a research submarine. scientist humour i guess.

i love all you readers and i can’t leave you with this vision before going to bed so, here’s a much cuter cousin to the Melanocetus, the pink and purple panda bear of the anglerfish family- Chaunacops coloratus

and in case you’re wondering what it might sound like down there, wonder no more. enjoy !

wild ’bout

“It is not every day I find a special stream like this with such robust wild brookies and indescribable beauty below the surface.”
i couldn’t agree more. here’s a lovely little river snorkelling film filled with curious and adorable little brookies and bigger ones making more curious and adorable little brook trout.

there’s also a whole lot of leaves. billions.

big thanks to BlueBlood for this gorgeous treat. enjoy !

hit or miss

in a nutshell, that’s what underwater fish portraits are about, specially when the camera’s held at arm’s length and i’m not looking at the screen or viewfinder while playing ‘my third eye is in the palm of my hand’ and gently holding a slippery/slimy creature that would rather not be held all the while trying to keep most of me above the water and not loose anything to the watery gods in the process.
hit or miss M.Fauvet:TLC 10-11-14this lovely out of season she-chunk wasn’t in an area known to have trout making it an even lovelier surprise even if she didn’t like posing, but that’s part of fun and joys as well. just as fly fishing itself and about a gazillion other things in life, getting a good portrait is hit or miss. best not to get expectations up too high.

Pablo from Below

an unexpected yet very welcomed guest from the casting pond.

Pablo from Below M.Fauvet:TLC 7-11-14
for a whole slew of fly casting related articles and not much about frogs, click the image.