Our full potential is when we flow as one

beautiful images with an even more beautiful message, drink them down and let them flow through.

What do you think about the number 19 ?

“I like it. An odd mix of the smallest number and the largest – together in one package. It speaks to the extremes of the Universe and yet shows how they can be inexorably tied.
It is also unique in that both numbers are formed by a single constant line (using standard type). One line straight; the other curving before coming down to the base line – not so distant cousins – and neither one having a family relation with any other number. The “4” has multiple stops and abrupt changes in directions with its multiple line formation and the “2”, “3”, “5”, and “7” have their sudden starts and stops.
Although a mere number, as humans, we can’t but help to tie it to other numbers by which we judge ourselves. As an age number it is greatly important; the first step from being a “teenager” to becoming a “young adult”. In fact, the shapes of the numbers suggest a relationship between youth and age – the straight erect youth next to the bent and wizened old-timer standing together – as if sharing the secrets of life (though “1” will certainly not listen).
I would have to put “19” up there as a major number; a number among numbers. Yes, I definitely like “19”.*

enough niceties, this is somewhere in the Scottish Highlands.

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* another anonymous gem caught in the web.

“Cultivate your curves,

they may be dangerous but they won’t be avoided.”
~Mae West

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the little guy takes the cake

was out streamside seeing things that aren’t really there,

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when out of the corner of the eye i saw this beautiful little puff look up in my direction and continue towards me picking up wee morsels along the way, chomping them down quickly.
the main camera and tripod where precariously balanced on a pointy boulder so i grabbed a few images of Mr. Mouse with the phone. its not the smallest of phones but i can only imagine that it probably must have seemed as a wall to him but that was neither here nor there for this guy, he was on a mission, a straight-line mission.mr mouse 1

here he is bottom-right pushing against the phone to get through ! 😆
take care Mr. Mouse, you made my day.

mr mouse 2

“Hug the shore; let others try the deep”

Virgil

poor guy. an exciting name like Publius Vergilius Maro gets vulgarly reduced to Virgil to what, simplify its pronunciation to the masses ?… anyhow, Publius the Poet wasn’t referring to some schmaltzy romanticism when he wrote that but was a deep understanding of one of the only real boundaries that nature on earth has to offer. shores, whether they be in fresh or salt, in still, flowing or seas are the demarcation point between us and them but its also where the two of us can meet as we’re both inextricably attracted to this boundary each one safely in our comfort zones. sometimes we mingle, sometimes we don’t and that’s just fine because something within told us to go there and we simply did what we where supposed to do.

meh… there i go doing exactly one of the things i dislike the most about contemporary photography and any kind of art in general. something i’ve (unsuccessfully) been (mildly) fighting against ever since i did photo school in 1982:

finding the need to put words to images where the image should tell the story on its own and whatever the viewer sees or not or feels or not is their own private business and not mine. besides, i’m a really shitty writer, i know it. it’s just not my thing and i definitely don’t enjoy it and it shows. i’ll try to not fall into that trap again so,

 here’s a shore that had its own story to tell.

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for the love of water

and everything that lives in it.image

this creature lies in one of my favourite playgrounds, the Aude river near home. the fish that live in it are rather pretty as well.

moonglow

by Benny Goodman

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“It must have been moonglow, way up in the blue

It must have been moonglow that led me straight to you

I still hear you sayin’, “Dear one, hold me fast”

And I keep on prayin’, “Oh Lord, please let this last”

We seemed to float right through the air

Heavenly songs seemed to come from everywhere

And now when there’s moonglow, way up in the blue

I’ll always remember, that moonglow gave me you

It must have been moonglow, way up in the blue

It must have been moonglow that led me straight to you

I still hear you sayin’, “Sweet child, hold me fast”

And I keep on prayin’, “Oh Lord, please let this last”

We seemed to float right through the air

Heavenly songs seemed to come from everywhere

And now when there’s moonglow, way up in the blue

I’ll always remember, that moonglow gave me you”


here’s the soundtrack for you to sing along. enjoy !

“Let the river take you, wherever that may be… “

sounds cliché but how cool is this ?

Sound recordist and Montana local, ‘Fishman’ Mike Kasic, has an unmatched obsession for the underwater wilderness of the Yellowstone River. In this 10 minute essay film, Mike swims the Yellowstone like a human-fish through swift river canyons, watching trout in fast currents filled with frothing water tornadoes, stopping only to body surf river waves.

Didymo- Some new views

“For years, Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) has been on many states’ high-priority aquatic invasive species list. Didymo, a freshwater diatom, has the potential to bloom, forming dense mats on stream and river bottoms making recreational activities difficult and giving affected waterways an unsightly appearance. Didymo blooms began in Canada in the late 1980s, and have since occurred around the globe in places like New Zealand, Chile, and across the northern hemisphere.”

from here it looks like the same ‘ole river snot we’ve unfortunately been seeing here and there around the globe but continued research seems to point to what makes this algea tick: waterway phosphorus levels and more precisely, low phosforous levels.

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it seems like alerting anglers and other water users to aquatic invaders such as Didymo, New Zealand Mudsnails and the parasite that causes Whirling Disease has kind of gone secondary but organisations such as flow are thankfully there to share information, remind us of these threats and how to do the right thing.

click the image above to acces the complete article and adjoining links and please share this with your angling friends. it’s not very exciting from a fun point of view but this stuf’s important.

Dewey

a long-long time ago in what seems to be another lifetime i knew this guy named Dewey. i don’t think it was his real name but that’s what everyone called him.

he balded early in life and had this old-timer Popeye look about him. he smoked a pipe several times a day and sort of had the same vocabulary as the stocky cartoon sailor.

its not like he had big bulging muscles, did any super-guy deeds and i don’t remember any tattoos or any lanky female companions (because he greatly favoured them overly-obese) but, he lived in a shack-type house near a port and that was enough for me to make the connection.

when you walked into his house you could smell all sorts of things and even if most of those where quite unpleasant, an overly eager imaginative mind could trick itself into believing they where smells from far away places brought back in moldy wooden crates in the bottom of the hold. one of his musty possessions was a wooden canoe but just like its owner, had never seen water, much less the open sea.

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one never knows what life brings but something tells me i’ll never see Dewey again and that’s ok. people are just like water, they come and go, they either land somewhere or flow from one area to another and eventually and inextricably evaporate into thin air, and the cycle continues.

“Ha! hold my Brain; be still my beating Heart.”

hold on there both of you, what’s coming up might be intense…

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title quote from William Mountfort’s Zelmane 1705.

an otherwise schmaltzy, overly drab, iffy romantic essay on the indirect art of not relating to fly fishing in any meaningful manner, but at least the title kinda depicts how i feel when i’m staring into watery void.

sort of.