Fly Tying- Jasper’s Carrot

if we take a quick look at the fly below we’ll see a really nice looking pattern but we also might think ‘nice but old hat’. now, if we take a look at the video and pay close attention to how it was made we’ll notice two super-duper easy-peasy tricks to get it just right and gorgeous and the second easy-peasy part just might bring some tiers over to the winged wet world where they might have been put off by the more traditional fuss and muss of having to pair left and right feather wing slips.

first up, the use of a two-toned Pearsall’s Gossimer thread
wound in touching turns down the hook shank then back up and that’s it. all the colour separation segmentation trigger points a fly and its tier could ever want or need in one simple step.
using the very same abdomen technique for standard non-winged wets, nymphs, emergers or dries instantly comes to mind. should you need a bulkier or asymmetric body simply create a base with standard thread and cover over with the silk. simples.

secondly- this is where this tutorial is absolutely brilliant !
construction of the wing itself using a single covert feather that’s tied on in one piece without having to deal with slips. put simply, you can’t go wrong and that’s a real bonus for those who like it sweet and simple and don’t have the patience for a possible wrong. i have no idea if Davie came up with the idea himself but i and i’m sure many others will be grateful he shared this great tip once they’ve checked out the vid and tried it out for themselves. enjoy !

a winged, quilled, cormorant buzzer

by Davie McPhail

here’s a very good example of what first appears to be non-sensical hybridization and further proof that trying to understand why a fish will take an artificial fly over another is as futile an attempt as well, maybe trying to understand the meaning of life or maybe why i went out with any of my exes…
what we have on today’s tying tutorial menu is your basic, if not more realistic and finer made than most, buzzer, or chironomid/midge pupae imitation with a black, undulating ‘wing’ mounted on it’s back.  bugs in their pupal stage don’t have wings and for the sake of argument, even if they did they most certainly wouldn’t be black and wouldn’t do the sexy wigglings that a marabou wing does.

now for the weird part. i’m getting more and more convinced that it’s this tail and not so much the body of the fly that’s really getting the fish to take.
after doing a lot of experimenting over the last year or so with this basic idea with flies like these that where inspired by the upright-wing Clyde style of wets or other UK reservoir flies.  far from wanting to compare my flies to Davie’s, this winged aspect and purpose however fits in with the Cormorant/Buzzer variant in the video at the bottom of the post.

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anyhow, what remains is, a whole heck of a lot of fish have been brought to the net with these weirdly winged flies. next step will have me trying out flies with just a wing. the idea is the wing acts as an extended body with a nice generalist shape with lots of attractive movement making the traditional body obsolete. of course, the main objective is finding flies that greatly attract fish but it’s also an exercise in minimalist tying. i guess the ultimate goal is to use just one material but that material’s selection and application needs to be just right. it’s a quest !
i’ve several prototypes that haven’t fished yet but judging by the all-important bidet-test, they have that certain-special ‘smell of success’ about them. pics to follow.

i almost forgot ! Davie’s video is as always an understated goldmine of tying tips and overall tying excellence. be sure to take note of the finer points by using the pause and replay buttons. enjoy !

forgive me father, for i’ve Hansed again…

ok, it might or might not be a sin but it’s hard not to when a fly looks so fish-sexy good !

hatching_olive_variant

today’s temptation: the Hatching Olive Variant by Hans Weilenmann. enjoy !

Cinnamon and Gold for dessert

another tasty treat-traditional wet fly by Davie McPhail

a lot of tiers hesitate tying winged wets because they believe it’s difficult to get the wing part right. wrong ! it’s all in the technique of taking a deep breath, presenting the wing correctly and holding it firmly until it’s tied in. try it a few times on a ‘practice’ fly and surprise yourself with the nifty results.
ok, now it’s time for dessert !