didn’t originally plan on going geek today but a little research on what this visual effect might be called shows that “The stroboscopic effect is a visual phenomenon caused by aliasing that occurs when continuous motion is represented by a series of short or instantaneous samples. It occurs when the view of a moving object is represented by a series of short samples as distinct from a continuous view, and the moving object is in rotational or other cyclic motion at a rate close to the sampling rate.”
in other words, like dancers at a disco, the subject should be moving in one way or another for us to get the out-of-sync effect whereas the gif above and others i’ve shared here of similar concept; several otherwise static images from a single original photo edited differently and giffed as one seem stroboscopic but aren’t since nothing is actually moving. there are three images in this gif, the colour original, a HDR filter colour version and a black and white version. what appears to be moving is just the eye/mind’s out-of-sync reaction to the different edits.

now, stroboscopic doesn’t have an antonym and i’m not even sure the term would apply anyhow so all i’m left with is a throbbing headache from researching all this whilst this damned landscape of a Pyrenean valley i photographed yesterday keeps on blinking… and i’ll have to leave the title at that. i still hope you like the image, even if it hurts.

‘I want to believe’

i’ve always found that to be somewhat of a strange statement. it seems to me like we have three options; either we believe or we don’t and instead of wanting, it might be more reasonable to say ‘I’m open to believing’ but that makes for a dull poster. wanting, specially when it concerns alien sheep, already tips the scales towards belief but i never wanted to believe in alien sheep, they wanted me to believe in them.photographed last spring along a stream that holds surprisingly large brown trout in northern England just a few days before the Brexit referendum, i’ve been wondering ever since if there might be a connection but then, it just might be something I’d like to believe.


How fish would see insects

if they had laser-scanning microscopic vision but perhaps luckily enough for us, they don’t, or otherwise they’d never be so easily fooled by our silly little flies…😉

midge pupae

“If you’ve ever wondered how a diving beetle swims through the water or manages to rest just on the surface, the answer is in part because its foot is infinitely more complicated than your own… The photos are made with a confocal laser-scanning microscope capable of “seeing” vast amounts of detail beyond what you might capture with a traditional lens-based microscope.”   trés groovy. for more absolutely amazing-mind-bending close-up bug imagery by Igor Siwanowicz click either pic above. enjoy !

diving beetle a.k.a, our little friend the singing penis.

‘a seemingly unsolvable problem is suddenly and abruptly resolved by the inspired and unexpected intervention of some new event, character, ability or object, or not’


bit of clichéd title there but i like corny. besides, doublethinking‘s fun.

about the colours of beauty

be warned, this is amazingly beautiful. one of those natural wonders that keep us wondering. as for the colours, just let them seep in. enjoy !

be sure to visit myLapse‘s page for more filming excellence

tristycurvy falls FTLOW m.fauvet-TLC 6-10-16

the little guy takes the cake

was out streamside seeing things that aren’t really there,

when out of the corner of the eye i saw this beautiful little puff look up in my direction and continue towards me picking up wee morsels along the way, chomping them down quickly.
the main camera and tripod where precariously balanced on a pointy boulder so i grabbed a few images of Mr. Mouse with the phone. its not the smallest of phones but i can only imagine that it probably must have seemed as a wall to him but that was neither here nor there for this guy, he was on a mission, a straight-line mission.mr mouse 1

here he is bottom-right pushing against the phone to get through !😆
take care Mr. Mouse, you made my day.

mr mouse 2

‘Small things amuse small minds’

the quote’s from Doris Lessing, i guess that kinda makes me a dummy and that’s ok.

so, you’ve accidentally caught a bird and not the fish. now what ?

that’s maybe not so far-fetched as it might seem at first as it’s hard to think of a place where we fish that isn’t also inhabited by birds and these birds will more often than not want to eat the very same things the fish do.
so far, i’ve managed to not hook any but a bat caught my fly on my back cast once and since i was fishing/casting upstream, by the time i first realized what happened and then brought it back to me it had drowned. sad moment.

in the video we’ll see an unfortunate fish-chasing gull who gets out of this predicament seemingly just fine, yay !
i can’t help but remember all the countless times i’ve had to yank out a fly during a drift when it was approached by ducks. this brings grrrrrs but a few grrrrs are a million times better than accidentally catching a creature that will probably fly off…

as noted, if this happens to you stay calm, be gentle yet firm and try to wrap the bird in a towel, t-shirt or something just as you’d wrap up a wounded cat or other animal. if you can, cover their eyes. being wrapped and temporarily blinded usually immobilizes them, giving you a better opportunity to get rid of that hook. speaking of hooks, it’s obvious once again that a barbless hook will a lot easier to remove if it already hasn’t come off as you retrieved the animal.

this isn’t an enjoy ! post but something to keep in the back of the mind. enjoy anyway.



Sticky, stretchy, waterproof, the stuff that holds it all together.

cased caddis housings are simply fascinating. used for protecting their fragile abdomens, to conceal themselves among all the stream bed debris and as ballast, these seemingly simple-minded creatures are pretty ingenious to say the least. the documentary footage is excellent, explanations simple. interesting for fishers and nature lovers of all ages, be sure to share this with your little ones, specially if they’re into creepy-crawly bugs, enjoy !